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3141 records – page 1 of 315.

A 1-year, three-couple expedition as a crew analog for a Mars mission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31234
Source
Environ Behav. 2002 Sep;34(5):672-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Gloria R Leon
Mera M Atlis
Deniz S Ones
Graeme Magor
Author Affiliation
Clinical Psychology, University of Minnesota, USA.
Source
Environ Behav. 2002 Sep;34(5):672-700
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Arctic Regions
Astronauts - psychology
Canada
Child
Cold Climate
Darkness
Expeditions
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mars
Norway
Personality
Personnel Selection
Questionnaires
Social Isolation
Space Simulation
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
This study assessed the intrapersonal and interpersonal functioning of a three-couple expedition group that included a 2 1/2-year-old child which was ice-locked on a boat in the High Arctic during a major portion of the expedition. Personality assessment indicated that team members were generally well adjusted, scoring relatively higher on well-being and achievement and relatively lower on stress reactivity. Weekly mood ratings showed that the group exhibited significantly higher positive than negative affect. Reported negative events were relatively most frequent at the beginning of the Arctic stay and toward the end of the darkness period and were lowest during the initial darkness interval. The period of darkness had both a salutary and negative impact. A highly important means of coping with stress was seeking emotional support from one's partner. Selection of couples with strong bonds with their partner appears to be one viable approach for crew selection for long-duration missions.
PubMed ID
12481801 View in PubMed
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3-Year follow-up of secondary chronic headaches: the Akershus study of chronic headache.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141854
Source
Eur J Pain. 2011 Feb;15(2):186-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Kjersti Aaseth
Ragnhild Berling Grande
Jurate Ĺ altyte Benth
Christofer Lundqvist
Michael Bjørn Russell
Author Affiliation
Head and Neck Research Group, Research Centre, Akershus University Hospital, 1478 Lørenskog, Norway. kjersti.aaseth@medisin.uio.no
Source
Eur J Pain. 2011 Feb;15(2):186-92
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Headache Disorders, Secondary - etiology - physiopathology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Norway
Pain Measurement
Questionnaires
Rhinitis - complications
Severity of Illness Index
Sinusitis - complications
Abstract
The objective was to investigate the 3-year course of secondary chronic headaches (?15days per month for at least 3months) in the general population. An age and gender stratified random sample of 30,000 persons aged 30-44years from the general population received a mailed questionnaire. All with self-reported chronic headache, 517 in total, were interviewed by neurological residents. The questionnaire response rate was 71%. The rate of participation in the initial and follow-up interview was 74% (633/852) and 87% (83/95) respectively. The International Classification of Headache Disorders was used, and then in the next step the Cervicogenic Headache International Study Group and American Academy of Otolaryngology criteria were used in relation to cervicogenic headache (CEH) and headache attributed to chronic rhinosinusitis (HACRS). Of those followed-up, 40 had headache attributed to head and/or neck trauma (chronic posttraumatic headache), 0 had CEH and 0 had HACRS according to the ICHD-II criteria, while 18 had CEH according to the Cervicogenic Headache International Study Group's criteria, and 37 had HACRS according to the criteria of the American Academy of Otolaryngology. The headache index (frequency×intensity×duration) was significantly reduced from baseline to follow-up in chronic posttraumatic headache and HACRS, but not in CEH. We conclude that secondary chronic headaches seem to have various course dependent of subtype. Recognizing the different types of secondary chronic headaches is of importance because it might have management implications.
PubMed ID
20667753 View in PubMed
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A 3-year follow-up study of psychosocial functioning and general symptoms in settled refugees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71526
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2002 Dec;106(6):415-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
B. Lie
Author Affiliation
Psychosocial Centre for Refugees, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. birgit_lie@c2i.net
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2002 Dec;106(6):415-25
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Dissociative Disorders - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Refugees - psychology
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Social Support
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - etiology - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Few community studies have addressed the longitudinal course of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in traumatized refugees in early resettlement. This longitudinal study investigated changes from the first (T1) to the second interview (T2), 3 years later. The relationship between traumatic exposures and psychosocial factors/psychological symptom load were examined. METHOD: Local health professionals performed the interviews, using rating scales and a structured questionnaire. A total of 240 (52%) refugees attended. RESULTS: Unchanged Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 and increase in Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and post-traumatic stress symptoms-16 between T1 and T2 were found, indicating the severity and chronicity of problems. Mean post-traumatic stress score was 15% above cut-off. Severe life-threatening trauma and present life in exile with unemployment and unresolved family reunion were risk factors. CONCLUSION: Early diagnostic interview should be followed by targeted approach. Pinpointing those in need of specialist services is essential. An interdisciplinary approach is necessary in this work.
PubMed ID
12392484 View in PubMed
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A 7-year prospective study of sense of humor and mortality in an adult county population: the HUNT-2 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140723
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2010;40(2):125-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Sven Svebak
Solfrid Romundstad
Jostein Holmen
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. sven.svebak@ntnu.no
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2010;40(2):125-46
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Wit and Humor as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
To prospectively explore the significance of sense of humor for survival over 7 years in an adult county population.
Residents in the county of Nord-Trøndelag, Norway, aged 20 and older, were invited to take part in a public health survey during 1995-97 (HUNT-2), and 66,140 (71.2 %) participated. Sense of humor was estimated by responses to a cognitive (N = 53,546), social (N = 52,198), and affective (N = 53,132) item, respectively, taken from the Sense of Humor Questionnaire (SHQ). Sum scores were tested by Cox survival regression analyses applied to gender, age, and subjective health.
Hazard ratios were reduced with sense of humor (continuous scale: HR = 0.73; high versus low by median split: HR = 0.50) as contrasted with increase of HR with a number of classical risk factors (e.g., cardiovascular disease: HR = 6.28; diabetes: HR = 4.86; cancer: HR = 4.18; poor subjective health: HR = 2.89). Gender proved to be of trivial importance to the effect of sense of humor in survival. Subjective health correlated positively with sense of humor and therefore might have presented a spurious relation of survival with humor, but sense of humor proved to reduce HR both in individuals with poor and good subjective health. However, above age 65 the effect of sense of humor on survival became less evident.
Sense of humor appeared to increase the probability of survival into retirement, and this effect appeared independent of subjective health. Age under 65 mediated this effect, whereas it disappeared beyond this age.
PubMed ID
20848871 View in PubMed
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17-beta-estradiol in relation to age at menarche and adult obesity in premenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86676
Source
Hum Reprod. 2008 Apr;23(4):919-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Emaus A.
Espetvedt S.
Veierød M B
Ballard-Barbash R.
Furberg A-S
Ellison P T
Jasienska G.
Hjartåker A.
Thune I.
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Ullevål University Hospital, 0407 Oslo, Norway. aina.emaus@medisin.uio.no
Source
Hum Reprod. 2008 Apr;23(4):919-27
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Breast Neoplasms
Estradiol - analysis - physiology
Female
Humans
Menarche - physiology
Menstrual Cycle - physiology
Norway
Obesity - physiopathology
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Saliva - chemistry
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We hypothesize that premenopausal endogenous estradiol may be associated with age at menarche and adult overweight and obesity, potentially contributing to breast cancer risk. METHODS: We assessed age at menarche by questionnaire among 204 healthy Norwegian women, aged 25-35 years. Measures of body composition included body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)), waist circumference (WC, cm), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and fat percentage dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, (DEXA). Daily salivary 17-beta-estradiol (E(2)) concentrations were collected throughout one entire menstrual cycle and assessed by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Linear regression analyses and linear mixed models for repeated measures were used and potential confounding factors and effect modifiers were tested. RESULTS: Among women with an early age at menarche (
PubMed ID
18227106 View in PubMed
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Abdominal complaints in general practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178352
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2004 Sep;22(3):157-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Per Olav Vandvik
Pål Kristensen
Lars Aabakken
Per G Farup
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Innlandet Hospital Health Authority, NO-2819 Gjøvik, Norway. per.vandvic@start.no
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2004 Sep;22(3):157-62
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Workload
Abstract
The study evaluates the prevalence and diagnoses of abdominal complaints in general practice, and compares characteristics and symptoms of patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and organic diseases.
A cross-sectional study.
Nine centres with 26 participating general practitioners (GPs) in Norway.
3097 out of 3369 consecutive adult patients answered a questionnaire regarding abdominal complaints IN the last 3 months. Those who consulted for the complaints were eligible for this study.
The GPs' diagnoses and patients' characteristics were reported in questionnaires.
460 out of 1499 patients with abdominal complaints consulted for these complaints; 392 were included in this study. The GPs diagnosed an FGID in 167 (42.6%) patients, organic disease in 145 (37.0%), and made no diagnosis in 80 (20.4%). Stress-related symptoms were a statistically significant predictor of a FGID (OR 1.95) and weight loss predicted in addition organic disease (OR 2.7) in 128 patients with a verified diagnosis.
Abdominal complaints are a common problem in general practice. The distinction between FGID, which accounted for half of the diagnoses, and organic disease was difficult. The only significant predictor for FGID was stress-related symptoms.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2005 Jun;23(2):126; author reply 126-716036553
PubMed ID
15370792 View in PubMed
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[Abortion among young women--the importance of family environment factors and social class]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81738
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jun 22;126(13):1734-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-22-2006
Author
Pedersen Willy
Samuelsen Sven Ove
Eskild Anne
Author Affiliation
Institutt for sosiologi og samfunnsgeografi, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1096 Blindern, 0317 Oslo. villy.pedersen@sosiologi.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jun 22;126(13):1734-7
Date
Jun-22-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in adolescence
Pregnancy, Unwanted
Questionnaires
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to investigate possible associations between social background, other aspects of childhood environment and induced abortion among young women. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Norwegian girls (N = 2,198), comprising a representative sample, were followed up through three data collections from they were in their teens in 1992 till they were young adult women (20 - 27 years) seven years later. A questionnaire was used to collect the data and the analyses were conducted by Cox regression. The response rate for the first data collection was 97%. The cumulative response rate over all three data collections was 69 %. RESULTS: In young adulthood we uncovered a steady reduction of induced abortion rates with increasing educational level. Women who had grown up in Northern Norway had higher rates than other women. There was a lower risk for induced abortion when parents were well educated and had fairly good jobs. Further, there were associations to parental divorce, weak parental monitoring and parental alcohol abuse. INTERPRETATION: A host of socioeconomic factors are associated with abortion risk. We need more thorough knowledge about these factors. We can, however, conclude that preventive efforts in this area should be targeted towards groups with risk factors.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jun 22;126(13):172716794660
PubMed ID
16794665 View in PubMed
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[Abortion applicants--reasons, prevention, information]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65045
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Aug 30;111(20):2557-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1991
Author
O. Jordheim
Author Affiliation
Gynekologisk-obstetrisk avdeling, Buskerud sentralsykehus, Drammen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Aug 30;111(20):2557-8
Date
Aug-30-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion Applicants - psychology
Abortion, Legal - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Contraception - methods
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In 1989, 300 women who were admitted for abortion at Buskerud Central Hospital answered questions about their reasons for deciding to terminate the pregnancy, and about prevention and information. The material was compared with a previous study of journals from 1977. In both cases the age group 15-20 years constituted 25% of the material. In 1989, 53% gave problems at home and economy as reasons for abortion, compared with 66% in 1977. In 1989, 34% emphasized school and education as reasons, compared with 14% in the previous study. 36% indicated that preventive measures had failed. 81% had received satisfactory information about the operation. 50% were in doubt about their decision.
PubMed ID
1948838 View in PubMed
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Absence of relationship between tuberculin reactivity and asthmatic symptoms, level of FEV1 and bronchial hyperresponsiveness in BCG vaccinated young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15399
Source
Allergy. 2002 Apr;57(4):336-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
H F Jentoft
E. Omenaas
G E Eide
A. Gulsvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Allergy. 2002 Apr;57(4):336-40
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Asthma - drug therapy - physiopathology
BCG Vaccine - therapeutic use
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - drug therapy - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Smoking
Treatment Outcome
Tuberculin - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Some recent studies have suggested that bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination or mycobacterial infection early in life is inversely related to asthma. We wondered if an increase in tuberculin reactivity was inversely related to commonly used indices of asthma in a population of young adults who were BCG vaccinated at age 14. METHODS: Men and women aged 20-44 years, randomly selected from the general population, were tuberculin tested with the epinephrine-Pirquet method with Norwegian-produced synthetic medium tuberculin (n = 588). In addition they were interviewed using eight questions on asthma symptoms and medication. Lung function and bronchial responsiveness were also tested. RESULTS: Altogether 95% of those studied had been BCG vaccinated at age 14 (n = 558). In the 386 subjects with complete examinations, there was no relationship between a positive tuberculin reaction (> or = 4 mm) and asthma symptoms or use of asthma medication. Furthermore we did not observe any relationship between a positive tuberculin reaction and the level of forced expiratory volume (FEV1) or a positive bronchial responsiveness test, assessed as the percent of predicted of FEV1 and PD20
PubMed ID
11906365 View in PubMed
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3141 records – page 1 of 315.