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2037 records – page 1 of 204.

[10 years with free abortion--has the abortion law influenced the number of abortions?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65046
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Aug 30;111(20):2522-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1991
Author
P. Bergsjø
Author Affiliation
Kvinneklinikken, Haukeland sykehus, Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Aug 30;111(20):2522-3
Date
Aug-30-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Female
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
1948827 View in PubMed
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The 24-hour rhythmicity of birth. A populational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65725
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1983;62(1):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
E. Glattre
T. Bjerkedal
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1983;62(1):31-6
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Circadian Rhythm
Delivery, Obstetric
Extraction, Obstetrical
Female
Humans
Labor, Induced
Norway
Pregnancy
Abstract
The incidence of birth has been determined for each hour of the day for all births in Norway in 1968-1977 of fetuses of 16 weeks of gestation or older, with resident mothers. The 24-hour incidence variations of births (A) with spontaneous onset and parturition, (B) with spontaneous onset, but delivery intervention, (C) with induced onset, but spontaneous birth, and (D) with induced onset and delivery intervention, are all different. It is shown that the curve for the hourly incidence of birth category A coincides very well with previous results of other workers. When multiple births are excluded and category A is split into first and later births in Northern and Southern Norway, dissimilarities arise between the respective 24-hour incidence curves. The results indicate that the 24-hour birth incidence variation has an underlying endogenous, circadian rhythmicity - possibly synchronized by the sun. The 24-hour rhythmicities of birth categories B, C and D seem to be purely exogenous - reflecting the working activity rhythms of hospital obstetricians and midwives.
PubMed ID
6858620 View in PubMed
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[31 women with drug problems got children--what happened after that?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9974
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jan 10;121(1):73-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2001
Author
A. Sundfaer
Author Affiliation
Barne- og ungdomspsykiatrisk poliklinikk Ullevål sykehus 0407 Oslo. bupull@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jan 10;121(1):73-5
Date
Jan-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Child
Child Behavior
Child Development
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - psychology
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The intention of this study was to increase the knowledge concerning the rehabilitation of women with drug problems after the birth of a child and to find out how the children developed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A follow-up study of 31 women, former drug and alcohol abusers and their children, 19 girls and 12 boys born in 1982-1983. The first survey took place when the children were 2-3 years of age, then when they were 7-9 and at last when they were 15-17. The biological mothers, foster or adoptive mothers, the children and their teachers were interviewed. RESULTS: The women got more support and control during the pregnancy than afterwards. Most of the mothers became single. Women with the shortest drug history, a good social network and a stable partner without drug problems kept the care of their children. By the first survey (1985), seven children had been placed in foster homes, in the second (1992) two further children had been taken away from their mothers, and in the third (1999) only one third of the children were living with their biological mothers. Most of the children did well at school and in their families, had friends and leisure activities despite still living by their mothers or in foster/adoption homes. None of the youngsters had been in conflict with the law or were drug abusers, but every second teenage girl needed psychological support. Children who had been stable by their drug-free biological mothers functioned best. INTERPRETATION: Mothers with drug problems do not get sufficient attention after the delivery and when the children grow up. A supporting family should be brought in contact with mother and child after the delivery. Under special circumstances pregnancy can be a positive turning point for women with drug problems.
PubMed ID
12013619 View in PubMed
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Source
Cesk Gynekol. 1975 Dec;40(10):757-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1975
Author
J. Presl
Source
Cesk Gynekol. 1975 Dec;40(10):757-8
Date
Dec-1975
Language
Czech
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Norway
Obstetrical Forceps - history
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
1106883 View in PubMed
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450K epigenome-wide scan identifies differential DNA methylation in newborns related to maternal smoking during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122072
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):1425-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Bonnie R Joubert
Siri E Håberg
Roy M Nilsen
Xuting Wang
Stein E Vollset
Susan K Murphy
Zhiqing Huang
Cathrine Hoyo
Øivind Midttun
Lea A Cupul-Uicab
Per M Ueland
Michael C Wu
Wenche Nystad
Douglas A Bell
Shyamal D Peddada
Stephanie J London
Author Affiliation
Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):1425-31
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors - genetics - metabolism
Biological Markers - blood
Chromatography, Liquid
Cohort Studies
Cotinine - blood
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - genetics - metabolism
DNA Methylation
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Epigenesis, Genetic
Female
Fetal Blood
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - epidemiology - genetics
Repressor Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Transcription Factors - genetics - metabolism
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, due to in utero exposures may play a critical role in early programming for childhood and adult illness. Maternal smoking is a major risk factor for multiple adverse health outcomes in children, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear.
We investigated epigenome-wide methylation in cord blood of newborns in relation to maternal smoking during pregnancy.
We examined maternal plasma cotinine (an objective biomarker of smoking) measured during pregnancy in relation to DNA methylation at 473,844 CpG sites (CpGs) in 1,062 newborn cord blood samples from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (450K).
We found differential DNA methylation at epigenome-wide statistical significance (p-value
Notes
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Cites: J Pediatr. 2009 Jan;154(1):17-918990410
Cites: Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom. 2009 May;23(9):1371-919337982
Cites: Genome Res. 2009 Jul;19(7):1165-7419494038
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2009 Sep 1;180(5):462-719498054
Cites: J Cell Physiol. 2010 Feb;222(2):282-519847803
Cites: Virchows Arch. 2010 Jan;456(1):13-2119844740
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Cites: Blood. 2011 Apr 14;117(15):e142-5021343615
Cites: Epigenetics. 2011 Jun;6(6):692-70221593595
Cites: Stem Cells. 2011 Feb;29(2):376-8521732494
Cites: Nat Rev Genet. 2011 Aug;12(8):529-4121747404
Cites: Genomics. 2011 Oct;98(4):288-9521839163
Cites: Semin Immunol. 2011 Oct;23(5):368-7821920773
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Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Feb;120(2):296-30222005006
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Mar;120(3):355-6022128036
Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):a40223026408
Erratum In: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Dec;120(12):A455
PubMed ID
22851337 View in PubMed
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Abnormally invasive placenta-prevalence, risk factors and antenatal suspicion: results from a large population-based pregnancy cohort study in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294473
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jul; 123(8):1348-55
Publication Type
Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Date
Jul-2016
Author
L Thurn
P G Lindqvist
M Jakobsson
L B Colmorn
K Klungsoyr
R I Bjarnadóttir
A M Tapper
P E Børdahl
K Gottvall
K B Petersen
L Krebs
M Gissler
J Langhoff-Roos
K Källen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Blekinge Hospital, Karlskrona, Sweden.
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jul; 123(8):1348-55
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hysterectomy - statistics & numerical data
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Peripartum Period
Placenta Accreta - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Postpartum Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Ultrasonography
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Uterine Rupture - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective was to investigate prevalence, estimate risk factors, and antenatal suspicion of abnormally invasive placenta (AIP) associated with laparotomy in women in the Nordic countries.
Population-based cohort study.
A 3-year Nordic collaboration among obstetricians to identify and report on uterine rupture, peripartum hysterectomy, excessive blood loss, and AIP from 2009 to 2012 The Nordic Obstetric Surveillance Study (NOSS).
In the NOSS study, clinicians reported AIP cases from maternity wards and the data were validated against National health registries.
Prevalence, risk factors, antenatal suspicion, birth complications, and risk estimations using aggregated national data.
A total of 205 cases of AIP in association with laparotomy were identified, representing 3.4 per 10 000 deliveries. The single most important risk factor, which was reported in 49% of all cases of AIP, was placenta praevia. The risk of AIP increased seven-fold after one prior caesarean section (CS) to 56-fold after three or more CS. Prior postpartum haemorrhage was associated with six-fold increased risk of AIP (95% confidence interval 3.7-10.9). Approximately 70% of all cases were not diagnosed antepartum. Of these, 39% had prior CS and 33% had placenta praevia.
Our findings indicate that a lower CS rate in the population may be the most effective way to lower the incidence of AIP. Focused ultrasound assessment of women at high risk will likely strengthen antenatal suspicion. Prior PPH is a novel risk factor associated with an increased prevalence of AIP.
An ultrasound assessment in women with placenta praevia or prior CS may double the awareness for AIP.
Notes
CommentIn: BJOG. 2016 May;123(6):1032 PMID 27101265
CommentIn: BJOG. 2016 May;123(6):1031-2 PMID 27101264
CommentIn: BJOG. 2017 Jan;124(1):164-165 PMID 28009121
PubMed ID
26227006 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1974 Jun 20;94(17):1148
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1974
Author
L. Helling
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1974 Jun 20;94(17):1148
Date
Jun-20-1974
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal
Attitude
Ethics, Medical
Female
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
4840752 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Mar 30;120(9):1079-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-2000
Author
R B Petersen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Mar 30;120(9):1079-80
Date
Mar-30-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal
Ethics, Medical
Female
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
Women's Rights
PubMed ID
10833971 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Abortion among young women--the importance of family environment factors and social class]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81738
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jun 22;126(13):1734-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-22-2006
Author
Pedersen Willy
Samuelsen Sven Ove
Eskild Anne
Author Affiliation
Institutt for sosiologi og samfunnsgeografi, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1096 Blindern, 0317 Oslo. villy.pedersen@sosiologi.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jun 22;126(13):1734-7
Date
Jun-22-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in adolescence
Pregnancy, Unwanted
Questionnaires
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to investigate possible associations between social background, other aspects of childhood environment and induced abortion among young women. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Norwegian girls (N = 2,198), comprising a representative sample, were followed up through three data collections from they were in their teens in 1992 till they were young adult women (20 - 27 years) seven years later. A questionnaire was used to collect the data and the analyses were conducted by Cox regression. The response rate for the first data collection was 97%. The cumulative response rate over all three data collections was 69 %. RESULTS: In young adulthood we uncovered a steady reduction of induced abortion rates with increasing educational level. Women who had grown up in Northern Norway had higher rates than other women. There was a lower risk for induced abortion when parents were well educated and had fairly good jobs. Further, there were associations to parental divorce, weak parental monitoring and parental alcohol abuse. INTERPRETATION: A host of socioeconomic factors are associated with abortion risk. We need more thorough knowledge about these factors. We can, however, conclude that preventive efforts in this area should be targeted towards groups with risk factors.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jun 22;126(13):172716794660
PubMed ID
16794665 View in PubMed
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2037 records – page 1 of 204.