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Absence of relation between sick leave caused by musculoskeletal disorders and exposure to magnetic fields in an aluminum plant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213432
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1996;17(1):37-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
B E Moen
P A Drabløs
S. Pedersen
M. Sjøen
G. Thommesen
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1996;17(1):37-43
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aluminum
Cohort Studies
Electromagnetic fields
Humans
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Norway
Occupational Diseases
Occupational Exposure
Odds Ratio
Radiation Injuries
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This is a study of the relationship between occupational exposure to magnetic fields in pot rooms and occurrence of sick leave caused by musculoskeletal disorders. The average exposure to static magnetic fields was 8 mT in the pot rooms. Ripple fields were recorded as well. A cohort of 342 exposed workers and 222 unexposed workers from the same electrolysis plant was retrospectively followed for 5 years. The reference group had a type of work similar to the exposed group except for the exposure to magnetic fields. The occurrence of sick leave and the diagnoses causing the sick leave were obtained from the Occupational Health Care Unit: these data were stored in their computer files. The data were complete. No relationship between the occurrence of sick leave caused by musculoskeletal disorders and exposure to magnetic fields was found. This was the case for both the annual number of periods of sick leave and the total number of days with sick leave. The results must be interpreted with caution due to limitations in the design and available data. Also, static magnetic fields constituted the major exposure, and the results may be different when related to work in other types of magnetic-field exposure.
PubMed ID
8742754 View in PubMed
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Accessibility of Norwegian dental services according to family income from 1977 to 1989.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75798
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1992 Feb;20(1):1-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
J. Grytten
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Dentistry, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1992 Feb;20(1):1-5
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Income
Logistic Models
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Tooth Extraction - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Abstract
During the last 10-20 yr there has been a marked increase in demand for dental services in most western countries. An important issue is how this increase in demand has influenced inequalities in use of services among different income groups in the population. It is of particular interest to study this in Norway, as almost all the costs for dental care among adults are borne by the patient. The aim of the present study was to examine how the effect of family income on demand for dental services has changed over time. The analyses were performed on three sets of national data from 1977, 1983, and 1989. The samples were representative of the non-institutionalized Norwegian population aged 20 yr and above. Inequalities in use of dental services among different income groups have decreased between 1977 and 1989. However, separate analyses on the data from 1989 showed that some inequalities still exist. A non-selective subsidizing policy for dental care is unlikely to have any great effect in reducing these inequalities. Subsidized dental care is likely to raise the total amount of dental care demanded. However, it is difficult to assess accurately the size of this increase as the elasticity of demand for dental care in Norway with respect to price is unknown.
PubMed ID
1547604 View in PubMed
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Acute mastoiditis: predictors for surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32849
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2000 Apr 15;52(2):149-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2000
Author
E. Kvestad
K J Kvaerner
I W Mair
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ullevål University Hospital, N-0407, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2000 Apr 15;52(2):149-55
Date
Apr-15-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Mastoiditis - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - surgery
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Otologic Surgical Procedures - methods - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To estimate the incidence of acute mastoiditis and identify predictors for mastoid surgery, a retrospective case record study of 38 children hospitalised for acute mastoiditis in Oslo from 1989 to 1998 was performed. Median age at diagnosis was 18 months and 13 (34%) of the children received mastoidectomy. Compared to the period 1970-1979, the incidence of mastoidectomy was significantly reduced. Only seven children (18%) had experienced acute otitis media prior to the current episode. Symptom duration of 6 days or more prior to hospitalisation and elevated white blood cell counts and C-reactive Protein were predictive for mastoidectomy ((OR = 5.0 (1.0-22.8), (OR = 24.5 (2.5-240) and OR = 10.5 (1-108.8)). Furthermore, total time from symptom onset to hospital discharge was significantly higher in children who received mastoidectomy. We suggest early referral to an otolaryngologic department in children suspected of acute mastoiditis.
PubMed ID
10767462 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction mortality related to use of calcium antagonists before admission to hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48085
Source
Cardiovasc Drugs Ther. 1998 May;12(2):183-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
K. Landmark
A. Reikvam
M. Abdelnoor
E. Sivertssen
I. Aursnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Cardiovasc Drugs Ther. 1998 May;12(2):183-7
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Calcium Channel Blockers - adverse effects
Drug Interactions
Female
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - complications - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Abstract
We investigated whether prior use of calcium antagonists in 80 (16.8%) out of 477 patients (64% males) admitted with acute myocardial infarction (MI) had any impact on in-hospital mortality. Patients using calcium antagonists were slightly older (74 years vs. 72 years, 2P = 0.039) than those not taking them and fewer were male patients. Previous MI, diabetes mellitus, and prior use of aspirin, beta-blockers, and long-acting nitrates were more frequent in patients on calcium antagonists. In contrast, fewer patients on calcium antagonists prior to symptoms received thrombolytic treatment (21.3% vs. 34.8%, 2P = 0.018). The study had an observational exposed/nonexposed design, and we looked for both crude and adjusted effects. Of the 83 patients (17.4%) who died during hospitalization, 18 patients were in the calcium antagonist group (22.5%). The odds ratio (OR) for these patients to die in the hospital was 1.48 and the 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-2.78; 2P = 0.19. When adjusting for confounders (gender, age, smoking habit, previous MI, and diabetes mellitus, as well as prior use of aspirin, beta-blockers, long-acting nitrates, and thrombolytic treatment at entry) OR was 1.08 and 95% CI 0.57-2.05; 2P = 0.85. Thus, we found no excess in-hospital mortality in patients with acute MI using calcium antagonists prior to the onset of symptoms.
PubMed ID
9652877 View in PubMed
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Acute postoperative seizures after epilepsy surgery - a long-term outcome predictor?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145101
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2011 Jan;123(1):48-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
K Å Alfstad
M I Lossius
G K Røste
P. Mowinckel
D. Scheie
O C Borota
P G Larsson
K O Nakken
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Epilepsy, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. kristin.alfstad@epilepsy.no
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2011 Jan;123(1):48-53
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Epilepsy - surgery
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Odds Ratio
Postoperative Complications - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Seizures - diagnosis - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The prognostic value of acute postoperative seizures (APS) after epilepsy surgery is much debated. This study evaluated APS, defined as seizures in the first week post-surgery, as a predictor of long-term seizure outcome, and investigated the utility of other potential outcome predictors.
Medical records of 48 patients with temporal and extra-temporal epilepsy surgery were studied. Forty patients had lesional surgery. All had at least 2 year postoperative follow-up.
At 2 year follow-up, 25 patients (53%) were seizure free. Univariate analysis showed that APS (P = 0.048), using = six AEDs prior to surgery (P = 0.03), pathological postoperative EEG (P = 0.043) and female gender (P = 0.012) were associated with seizure recurrence.
Univariate analysis indicate that APS, a high number of AEDs used prior to surgery, and pathological postoperative EEG are possible predictors of seizure recurrence after epilepsy surgery. Only gender retained significance in the multivariate analysis.
PubMed ID
20199515 View in PubMed
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Additive effects of the major risk alleles of IRF5 and STAT4 in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90739
Source
Genes Immun. 2009 Jan;10(1):68-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Nordmark G.
Kristjansdottir G.
Theander E.
Eriksson P.
Brun J G
Wang C.
Padyukov L.
Truedsson L.
Alm G.
Eloranta M-L
Jonsson R.
Rönnblom L.
Syvänen A-C
Author Affiliation
Section of Rheumatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Gunnel.Nordmark@medsci.uu.se
Source
Genes Immun. 2009 Jan;10(1):68-76
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alleles
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gene Frequency
Haplotypes
Heterozygote
Humans
Interferon Regulatory Factors - genetics - immunology
Linear Models
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Genetic
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Probability
Risk factors
STAT4 Transcription Factor - genetics - immunology
Sjogren's Syndrome - genetics - immunology
Sweden
Abstract
Primary Sj?gren's syndrome (SS) shares many features with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we investigated the association of the three major polymorphisms in IRF5 and STAT4 found to be associated with SLE, in patients from Sweden and Norway with primary SS. These polymorphisms are a 5-bp CGGGG indel in the promoter of IRF5, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs10488631 downstream of IRF5 and the STAT4 SNP rs7582694, which tags the major risk haplotype of STAT4. We observed strong signals for association between all three polymorphisms and primary SS, with odds ratios (ORs) >1.4 and P-values
PubMed ID
19092842 View in PubMed
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Adiposity, physical activity and risk of diabetes mellitus: prospective data from the population-based HUNT study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287957
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 01 16;7(1):e013142
Publication Type
Article
Date
01-16-2017
Author
Kirsti Vik Hjerkind
Jo S Stenehjem
Tom I L Nilsen
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 01 16;7(1):e013142
Date
01-16-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Exercise
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Overweight - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Physical activity may counteract the adverse effects of adiposity on cardiovascular mortality; however, the evidence of a similar effect on diabetes is sparse. This study examines whether physical activity may compensate for the adverse effect of adiposity on diabetes risk.
The study population consisted of 38 231 individuals aged 20 years or more who participated in two consecutive waves of the prospective longitudinal Nord-Trøndelag Health Study in Norway: in 1984-1986 and in 1995-1997. A Poisson regression model with SEs derived from robust variance was used to estimate adjusted risk ratios of diabetes between categories of body mass index and physical activity.
Risk of diabetes increased both with increasing body mass (Ptrend
Notes
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PubMed ID
28093432 View in PubMed
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Adolescent health and high school dropout: a prospective cohort study of 9000 Norwegian adolescents (the Young-HUNT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106925
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(9):e74954
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Karin A A De Ridder
Kristine Pape
Roar Johnsen
Turid Lingaas Holmen
Steinar Westin
Johan Håkon Bjørngaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway ; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trøndelag Health Trust, Levanger, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(9):e74954
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cluster analysis
Family
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Schools
Student Dropouts - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
High school dropout is of major concern in the western world. Our aims were to estimate the risk of school dropout in adolescents following chronic somatic disease, somatic symptoms, psychological distress, concentration difficulties, insomnia or overweight and to assess to which extent the family contributes to the association between health and school dropout.
A population of 8950 school-attending adolescents (13-21 years) rated their health in the Young-HUNT 1 Study (90% response rate) in 1995-1997. High school dropout or completion, was defined with the Norwegian National Education Database in the calendar year the participant turned 24 years old. Parental socioeconomic status was defined by using linkages to the National Education Database, the National Insurance Administration and the HUNT2 Survey. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and risk differences of high school dropout, both in the whole population and among siblings within families differentially exposed to health problems.
All explored health dimensions were strongly associated with high school dropout. In models adjusted for parental socioeconomic status, the risk differences of school dropout according to health exposures varied between 3.6% (95% CI 1.7 to 5.5) for having = 1 somatic disease versus none and 11.7% (6.3 to 17.0) for being obese versus normal weight. The results from the analyses comparing differentially exposed siblings, confirmed these results with the exception of weaker associations for somatic diseases and psychological distress. School dropout was strongly clustered within families (family level conditional intraclass correlation 0.42).
Adolescent health problems are markers for high school dropout, independent of parental socioeconomic status. Although school dropout it strongly related to family-level factors, also siblings with poor health have reduced opportunity to complete high school compared to healthy siblings. Public health policy should focus on ensuring young people with poor health the best attainable education.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24086408 View in PubMed
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Adolescent occasional smokers, a target group for smoking cessation? the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, Norway, 1995-1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67449
Source
Prev Med. 2000 Dec;31(6):682-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
T L Holmen
E. Barrett-Connor
J. Holmen
L. Bjermer
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Community Medicine Research Unit, Verdal, Norway. verdalfh@online.no
Source
Prev Med. 2000 Dec;31(6):682-90
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Probability
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects - trends
Smoking Cessation - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Adolescent smokers are often unsuccessful in quitting and difficult to retain in cessation programs. In health promotion, focusing on the right target groups is essential. Aim. The aim was to examine if adolescent occasional smokers differ from daily smokers, and if possible differences could be useful for targeted smoking cessation programs. METHODS: Ninety-one percent of all teenagers attending junior high or high schools participated in a cross-sectional study, conducted in Nord-Trøndelag County, Norway, 1995-1997, including 8,460 students 13-18 years old. Information on smoking habits, education, after school activities, and parents was obtained by self-administered questionnaires. RESULTS: Fifty-four percent of boys and 57% of girls had tried at least one cigarette. Of these, 36% of boys and 41% of girls were current smokers, half of whom reported occasional smoking. Students who had quit smoking had more often been occasional than daily smokers. Compared to daily smokers, occasional smokers participated in higher academic courses, were more engaged in organized activities and sports, had been drunk less often, and had better family role models. CONCLUSION: Differences support potential utility of focusing on occasional smokers as a special target group in smoking cessation programs.
PubMed ID
11133335 View in PubMed
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The adult incidence of asthma and respiratory symptoms by passive smoking in uterus or in childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15070
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005 Jul 1;172(1):61-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2005
Author
Trude Duelien Skorge
Tomas M L Eagan
Geir Egil Eide
Amund Gulsvik
Per S Bakke
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, Norway. trude.duelien@helse-bergen.no
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005 Jul 1;172(1):61-6
Date
Jul-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Fetus
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Questionnaires
Respiration Disorders - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
The effects of pre- or postnatal passive smoking on the adult incidence of asthma have not been reported previously. Between 1985 and 1996/1997, we conducted an 11-year community cohort study on the incidence of asthma and respiratory symptoms in Western Norway. The cohort included 3,786 subjects aged 15 to 70 years, of which 2,819 were responders at both baseline and follow-up. The incidence of asthma and five respiratory symptoms by self-reported exposure to maternal smoking in utero and in childhood, as well as smoking by other household members in childhood, was examined. After adjustment for sex, age, education, hay fever, personal smoking, and occupational exposure, maternal smoking was associated with asthma, phlegm cough, chronic cough, dyspnea grade 2, attacks of dyspnea, and wheezing, with odds ratios (95% confidence intervals [CI]) of 3.0 (1.6, 5.6), 1.7 (1.1, 2.6), 1.9 (1.2, 3.0), 1.9 (1.2, 3.0), 2.0 (1.3, 3.0), and 1.4 (0.9, 2.2), respectively. The adjusted attributable fractions (95% CI) of the adult incidence of asthma were 17.3% (5.2, 27.9) caused by maternal smoking and 9.3% (95% CI, -23.2, 33.2) caused by smoking by other household members. Exposure to pre- and postnatal smoking carries a substantial risk for developing adult asthma and respiratory symptoms.
PubMed ID
15805186 View in PubMed
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591 records – page 1 of 60.