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3209 records – page 1 of 321.

A 1-year, three-couple expedition as a crew analog for a Mars mission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31234
Source
Environ Behav. 2002 Sep;34(5):672-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Gloria R Leon
Mera M Atlis
Deniz S Ones
Graeme Magor
Author Affiliation
Clinical Psychology, University of Minnesota, USA.
Source
Environ Behav. 2002 Sep;34(5):672-700
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Arctic Regions
Astronauts - psychology
Canada
Child
Cold Climate
Darkness
Expeditions
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mars
Norway
Personality
Personnel Selection
Questionnaires
Social Isolation
Space Simulation
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
This study assessed the intrapersonal and interpersonal functioning of a three-couple expedition group that included a 2 1/2-year-old child which was ice-locked on a boat in the High Arctic during a major portion of the expedition. Personality assessment indicated that team members were generally well adjusted, scoring relatively higher on well-being and achievement and relatively lower on stress reactivity. Weekly mood ratings showed that the group exhibited significantly higher positive than negative affect. Reported negative events were relatively most frequent at the beginning of the Arctic stay and toward the end of the darkness period and were lowest during the initial darkness interval. The period of darkness had both a salutary and negative impact. A highly important means of coping with stress was seeking emotional support from one's partner. Selection of couples with strong bonds with their partner appears to be one viable approach for crew selection for long-duration missions.
PubMed ID
12481801 View in PubMed
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[2 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WITH FLUORIDE BRUSHING OF TEETH OF SCHOOL CHILDREN IN MODUM.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45167
Source
Dtsch Zahnarztl Z. 1965 Apr 1;20:336-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1965
Author
K. HUNSTADBRATEN
Source
Dtsch Zahnarztl Z. 1965 Apr 1;20:336-8
Date
Apr-1-1965
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Fluorides, Topical
Norway
School Health Services
PubMed ID
14286235 View in PubMed
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[3 years' experience with toothbrushing with fluorides in school children in Modum]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45012
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1966 Mar;76(3):164-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1966
Author
K. Hunstadbråten
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1966 Mar;76(3):164-73
Date
Mar-1966
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Dental caries
Female
Fluorides, Topical
Humans
Male
Norway
School Health Services
Statistics
PubMed ID
5219349 View in PubMed
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A 9.6 kilobase deletion in the low density lipoprotein receptor gene in Norwegian familial hypercholesterolemia subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36531
Source
Clin Genet. 1992 Dec;42(6):288-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
O K Rødningen
O. Røsby
S. Tonstad
L. Ose
K. Berg
T P Leren
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, Ullevål Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Clin Genet. 1992 Dec;42(6):288-95
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Base Sequence
Blotting, Southern
Child
Cholesterol - blood
DNA - analysis
Exons - genetics
Female
Haplotypes
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia, Familial - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Norway
Pedigree
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Receptors, LDL - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sequence Deletion
Xanthomatosis - etiology
Abstract
Haplotype analysis of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene was performed in Norwegian subjects heterozygous for familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA, using an exon 18 specific probe and the restriction enzyme NcoI, showed that two out of 57 unrelated FH subjects had an abnormal 3.6 kb band. Further analyses revealed that this abnormal band was due to a 9.6 kb deletion that included exons 16 and 17. The 5' deletion breakpoint was after 245 bp of intron 15, and the 3' deletion breakpoint was in exon 18 after nucleotide 3390 of cDNA. Thus, both the membrane-spanning and cytoplasmatic domains of the receptor had been deleted. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed to identify this deletion among other Norwegian FH subjects. As a result of this screening one additional subject was found out of 124 subjects screened. Thus, three out of 181 (1.7%) unrelated Norwegian FH subject possessed this deletion. The deletion was found on the same haplotype in the three unrelated subjects, suggesting a common mutagenic event. The deletion is identical to a deletion (FH-Helsinki) that is very common among Finnish FH subjects. However, it is not yet known whether the mutations evolved separately in the two countries.
PubMed ID
1362925 View in PubMed
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A 10-year retrospective study of interhospital patient transport using inhaled nitric oxide in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269280
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2015 May;59(5):648-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
C. Buskop
P P Bredmose
M. Sandberg
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2015 May;59(5):648-53
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Critical Care
Equipment Failure - statistics & numerical data
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Nitric Oxide - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Norway
Respiratory Insufficiency - mortality - therapy
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Tertiary Care Centers
Transportation of Patients
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Anaesthesiologists from Oslo University Hospital have transported patients with severe oxygenation failure with inhaled nitric oxide (usually 20?ppm) from other hospitals to a tertiary care centre since 2002 in an effort to reduce the number of patients that otherwise would require transport with ongoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the patient safety during transport with inhaled nitric oxide.
All patient transports with ongoing nitric oxide treatment undertaken from 2003 to 2012 were identified in the transport database. The frequency of adverse events and their impact on patient safety were studied in addition to response to inhaled nitric oxide and adjusted intensive care treatment and time aspects of the transports. Information about in-hospital treatment and survival were extracted from the hospital patient records.
Adverse events were recorded in 12 of the 104 transports. Seven of the adverse events were due to malfunctioning technical equipment, three were related to medication other than the inhaled nitric oxide and two were related to ventilation. No adverse events resulted in permanent negative patient consequences or in discontinuation of the transport. Out of 104 patients, 79 responded to treatment with inhaled nitric oxide and other treatment changes by an increase in oxygen saturation of more than 5%. The 30-day mortality was 27% in the group transported with inhaled nitric oxide.
Transporting patients on inhaled nitric oxide is an alternative in selected patients who would otherwise require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation during transport.
PubMed ID
25782015 View in PubMed
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18S rDNA polymerase chain reaction and sequencing in onychomycosis diagnostics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82167
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2006;86(3):223-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Walberg Mette
Mørk Cato
Sandven Per
Jorde Anne Tomine
Bjørås Magnar
Gaustad Peter
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medical Microbiology, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, NO0027 Oslo, Norway. mette.walberg@labmed.uio.no
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2006;86(3):223-6
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Fungal - analysis
DNA, Ribosomal - analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Onychomycosis - diagnosis - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Predictive value of tests
Trichophyton - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
Diagnostic approaches to onychomycosis have traditionally been based on a combination of culture and microscopy. In the present study clinical specimens from 346 patients with suspected onychomycosis were analysed by 18S polymerase chain reaction (detection) followed by sequencing and subsequent database search (identification) in parallel with routine culture on agar (detection and identification). In 49 samples Trichophyton rubrum was identified by culture and sequencing. In 67 additional culture negative samples, a positive dermatophyte sequence was obtained (T. rubrum in 54, T. mentagrophytes in 5, and T. species in 8 samples). Fifteen samples cultured positive while no sequence was obtained. Two hundred and seven samples were negative by culture as well as by sequencing. Nails from 10 healthy controls were negative by culture and sequencing. In conclusion, the number of specimens that were positive by polymerase chain reaction was more than double the number that were positive by culture alone.
PubMed ID
16710579 View in PubMed
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[31 women with drug problems got children--what happened after that?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9974
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jan 10;121(1):73-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2001
Author
A. Sundfaer
Author Affiliation
Barne- og ungdomspsykiatrisk poliklinikk Ullevål sykehus 0407 Oslo. bupull@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jan 10;121(1):73-5
Date
Jan-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Child
Child Behavior
Child Development
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - psychology
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The intention of this study was to increase the knowledge concerning the rehabilitation of women with drug problems after the birth of a child and to find out how the children developed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A follow-up study of 31 women, former drug and alcohol abusers and their children, 19 girls and 12 boys born in 1982-1983. The first survey took place when the children were 2-3 years of age, then when they were 7-9 and at last when they were 15-17. The biological mothers, foster or adoptive mothers, the children and their teachers were interviewed. RESULTS: The women got more support and control during the pregnancy than afterwards. Most of the mothers became single. Women with the shortest drug history, a good social network and a stable partner without drug problems kept the care of their children. By the first survey (1985), seven children had been placed in foster homes, in the second (1992) two further children had been taken away from their mothers, and in the third (1999) only one third of the children were living with their biological mothers. Most of the children did well at school and in their families, had friends and leisure activities despite still living by their mothers or in foster/adoption homes. None of the youngsters had been in conflict with the law or were drug abusers, but every second teenage girl needed psychological support. Children who had been stable by their drug-free biological mothers functioned best. INTERPRETATION: Mothers with drug problems do not get sufficient attention after the delivery and when the children grow up. A supporting family should be brought in contact with mother and child after the delivery. Under special circumstances pregnancy can be a positive turning point for women with drug problems.
PubMed ID
12013619 View in PubMed
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[47,XYY syndrome. Is diagnosis of significance?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33871
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Apr 20;118(10):1563-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-20-1998
Author
O B Kittang
P. Vesterhus
Author Affiliation
Barneavdelingen Vest-Agder sentralsykehus, Kristiansand.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Apr 20;118(10):1563-4
Date
Apr-20-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height
Child
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Growth
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway
Patient Education
Psychomotor Performance
Retrospective Studies
XYY Karyotype - diagnosis - psychology
Abstract
Over a 10-year period, from 1984-1995, in the Norwegian county of Vest-Agder, five patients in a paediatric clinic were diagnosed as having chromosome constitution 47,XYY. There are 1,250 males born a year in Vest-Agder. The patients were identified with bias, and not in a routine or prospective screening programme. All patients except one, a child who was diagnosed by chance at the age of one week; were admitted because of moderate conduct disorders or problems at school and striking tallness of stature. The half-brother of one of the 47,XYY boys had Klinefelter's syndrome 47,XYY. We conclude that identification of 47,XYY syndrome and information about it were of significance and help in counselling the patients and their families.
PubMed ID
9615584 View in PubMed
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A 57-year follow-up of occlusal changes, oral health, and attitudes toward teeth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135775
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011 Apr;139(4 Suppl):S102-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Arild Stenvik
Lisen Espeland
Rolf E Berg
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011 Apr;139(4 Suppl):S102-8
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Case-Control Studies
Child
Dental Care - utilization
Esthetics, Dental
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Malocclusion - complications - pathology - psychology
Malocclusion, Angle Class III - etiology
Norway
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - utilization
Photography, Dental
Self-Assessment
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - etiology
Tooth Loss - etiology
Abstract
Very few studies have addressed long-term development and risks associated with untreated malocclusion. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in occlusion in a lifelong perspective and to compare oral health and attitudes toward teeth among persons with malocclusion with those having normal occlusion.
In 1950 an epidemiologic survey of 2349 8-year-olds was conducted and included 4 intraoral photographs. Three selected samples with different malocclusions (deep bite, crossbite, or irregular teeth) and 1 sample with normal occlusion (a total of 183 subjects) were, 57 years later, invited for examination and an extensive interview about dental experiences and attitudes. Sixty-nine responded (38%) and constitute the subjects studied.
Malocclusion remained the same or worsened except in subjects having deep bite in childhood, which in some improved and in others became worse. Crowding generally increased. Sixteen persons reported moderate or severe temporomandular joint (TMJ) problems, and of these 7 belonged to the group with crossbite in childhood. With few exceptions, the subjects in all samples had good oral hygiene, visited the dentist regularly, and had well-preserved dentitions. Mean number of missing teeth was significantly lower among those with normal occlusion compared with the malocclusion groups. Individuals with normal occlusion responded favorably to all questions related to attitudes and experiences about their teeth, while responses in the malocclusion groups varied.
Persons with the particular malocclusions examined experienced more problems related to teeth later in life compared with those having normal occlusion in childhood.
PubMed ID
21435527 View in PubMed
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3209 records – page 1 of 321.