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1915 records – page 1 of 192.

A 10-year trend of insomnia prevalence in the adult Norwegian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257604
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Feb;15(2):173-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Ståle Pallesen
Børge Sivertsen
Inger Hilde Nordhus
Bjørn Bjorvatn
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, P.O. Box 7807, N-5020 Bergen, Norway; Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Jonas Lies vei 65, 5021 Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: staale.pallesen@psysp.uib.no.
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Feb;15(2):173-9
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
We aimed to investigate the 10-year trend in the prevalence of insomnia symptoms, insomnia cases, and use of hypnotic agents in the adult Norwegian population.
Data from two representative surveys assessing identical insomnia symptoms in the adult population of Norway, one conducted in 1999-2000 (N=2001) and one conducted in 2009-2010 (N=2000), were compared.
Controlling for basic demographic variables, significant increases were found over the 10-year study period in the prevalence of sleep-onset insomnia from 13.1% to 15.2%, dissatisfaction with sleep from 8.2% to 13.6%, daytime impairment from 14.8% to 18.8%, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) insomnia cases from 11.9% to 15.5%, and hypnotic agent use from 6.9% to 11.1%. No secular trend was found for maintenance insomnia or for early morning awakening insomnia. Across the two surveys, women reported a higher prevalence of insomnia than men. Age was positively associated with the prevalence of nocturnal sleep problems and use of hypnotic agents but was inversely associated with daytime impairment. Individuals with low socioeconomic status (SES) reported a higher prevalence of several insomnia symptoms.
Insomnia seems to be on the rise in the general adult population, which gives reason for concern. Prevention of insomnia and cost-effective interventions should receive higher priority in the future.
PubMed ID
24382513 View in PubMed
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17-beta-estradiol in relation to age at menarche and adult obesity in premenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86676
Source
Hum Reprod. 2008 Apr;23(4):919-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Emaus A.
Espetvedt S.
Veierød M B
Ballard-Barbash R.
Furberg A-S
Ellison P T
Jasienska G.
Hjartåker A.
Thune I.
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Ullevål University Hospital, 0407 Oslo, Norway. aina.emaus@medisin.uio.no
Source
Hum Reprod. 2008 Apr;23(4):919-27
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Breast Neoplasms
Estradiol - analysis - physiology
Female
Humans
Menarche - physiology
Menstrual Cycle - physiology
Norway
Obesity - physiopathology
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Saliva - chemistry
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We hypothesize that premenopausal endogenous estradiol may be associated with age at menarche and adult overweight and obesity, potentially contributing to breast cancer risk. METHODS: We assessed age at menarche by questionnaire among 204 healthy Norwegian women, aged 25-35 years. Measures of body composition included body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)), waist circumference (WC, cm), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and fat percentage dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, (DEXA). Daily salivary 17-beta-estradiol (E(2)) concentrations were collected throughout one entire menstrual cycle and assessed by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Linear regression analyses and linear mixed models for repeated measures were used and potential confounding factors and effect modifiers were tested. RESULTS: Among women with an early age at menarche (
PubMed ID
18227106 View in PubMed
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A 60-year follow-up of the incidence and prevalence of multiple sclerosis in Hordaland County, Western Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272084
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2016 Jan;87(1):100-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
N. Grytten
J H Aarseth
H M B Lunde
K M Myhr
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2016 Jan;87(1):100-5
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Aged
Child
Delayed Diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Progressive - epidemiology
Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Sunlight
Vitamin D - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
Investigate the incidence of multiple sclerosis during 1953-2013 and estimate the prevalence rate of MS on 1 January 2003 and 2013 in Hordaland County, Western Norway.
All patients with onset of disease in Hordaland 1953-2013 were identified in files from previous studies until 2003 and from patient records at the departments of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital and Haugesund Hospital during 2003-2013. 1558 patients were assessed and 1402 of these were included, of whom 1035 were alive and living in Hordaland at prevalence day 1 January 2013. Annual incidence rates were calculated for 1953-2013.
On 1 January 2003, the crude prevalence rate was 191/100 000 population and on 1 January 2013, the crude prevalence rate was 211.4 (95% CI 198.3 to 224.2) per 100 000; 270.9 (95% CI 250.6 to 292.3) for women and 151.8 (95% CI 136.8 to 167.9) for men. Prevalence peaked at ages 55-59 years for women and 60-64 years for men. The annual incidence rate increased from 1.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 2.6) per 100 000 during 1953-1957 to 7.2 (95% CI 6.0 to 8.5) during 1978-1982 and to 8.5 (95% CI 7.3 to 9.7) during 2003-2007, thus indicating a stabilising incidence over the past 35 years. The female/male ratio ranged from 1.2:1 to 1.8:1 (p=0.381) during the period.
Stabilising rather than increasing incidence combined with the stable female/male ratio are indicative of non-fluctuating environmental factors in a geographical area otherwise characterised by lack of vitamin D effective sun exposure. The rising prevalence of MS could result from improved survival and follow-up methodology.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25714916 View in PubMed
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[Abdominal injuries. Occurrence and outcome]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38063
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Aug 10;109(22):2111-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1989
Author
T H Edna
T. Bjerkeset
H E Myrvold
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Aug 10;109(22):2111-4
Date
Aug-10-1989
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
A retrospective study of intra-abdominal injuries treated during the ten-year period 1977 to 1986, show that road traffic accidents were responsible for the injury in 38% of 221 patients. Accidents from sports and recreation were the cause in 23% of the cases. The median age was 19 years. Renal injuries were most common, followed by splenic injuries. 119 patients (54%) were operated for abdominal injury. 90 patients (41%) needed blood transfusions and 29 (13%) were treated by respirator. 95 patients had concommitant extraabdominal injuries. The overall lethality was 9%.
PubMed ID
2772874 View in PubMed
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Absence of association between reproductive variables and the risk of breast cancer in young women in Sweden and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25167
Source
Br J Cancer. 1990 Jul;62(1):122-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1990
Author
H O Adami
R. Bergström
E. Lund
O. Meirik
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1990 Jul;62(1):122-6
Date
Jul-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous
Age Factors
Breast Feeding
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Menstrual Cycle
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Parity
Pregnancy
Reproduction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
A population-based case-control study was conducted in Sweden and Norway to analyse possible associations between breast cancer occurring before the age of 45 and several different characteristics of the women's reproductive life. A total of 422 (89.2%) of all eligible patients, and 527 (80.6%) of all eligible controls were interviewed. In univariate analyses, different characteristics of child-bearing (parity, age at first birth, years between last birth and diagnosis, duration of breast-feeding, and number of induced and spontaneous abortions), measures of the fertile or ovulating period (age at menarche, years between menarche and first pregnancy, and estimates of the menstruation span) and symptoms of anovulatory cycles or infertility were all seemingly unrelated to, or at most weakly associated with breast cancer. Adjustment for possible confounding factors in multivariate analyses resulted in largely unaltered risk estimates with odds ratios close to unity and without any significant trends when the exposure variables were studied in categorised or in continuous form. We conclude that reproductive factors did not explain the occurrence of breast cancer before the age of 45 in this population.
PubMed ID
2390471 View in PubMed
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Absence of relation between sick leave caused by musculoskeletal disorders and exposure to magnetic fields in an aluminum plant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213432
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1996;17(1):37-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
B E Moen
P A Drabløs
S. Pedersen
M. Sjøen
G. Thommesen
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1996;17(1):37-43
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aluminum
Cohort Studies
Electromagnetic fields
Humans
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Norway
Occupational Diseases
Occupational Exposure
Odds Ratio
Radiation Injuries
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This is a study of the relationship between occupational exposure to magnetic fields in pot rooms and occurrence of sick leave caused by musculoskeletal disorders. The average exposure to static magnetic fields was 8 mT in the pot rooms. Ripple fields were recorded as well. A cohort of 342 exposed workers and 222 unexposed workers from the same electrolysis plant was retrospectively followed for 5 years. The reference group had a type of work similar to the exposed group except for the exposure to magnetic fields. The occurrence of sick leave and the diagnoses causing the sick leave were obtained from the Occupational Health Care Unit: these data were stored in their computer files. The data were complete. No relationship between the occurrence of sick leave caused by musculoskeletal disorders and exposure to magnetic fields was found. This was the case for both the annual number of periods of sick leave and the total number of days with sick leave. The results must be interpreted with caution due to limitations in the design and available data. Also, static magnetic fields constituted the major exposure, and the results may be different when related to work in other types of magnetic-field exposure.
PubMed ID
8742754 View in PubMed
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Absence of relationship between tuberculin reactivity and asthmatic symptoms, level of FEV1 and bronchial hyperresponsiveness in BCG vaccinated young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15399
Source
Allergy. 2002 Apr;57(4):336-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
H F Jentoft
E. Omenaas
G E Eide
A. Gulsvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Allergy. 2002 Apr;57(4):336-40
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Asthma - drug therapy - physiopathology
BCG Vaccine - therapeutic use
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - drug therapy - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Smoking
Treatment Outcome
Tuberculin - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Some recent studies have suggested that bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination or mycobacterial infection early in life is inversely related to asthma. We wondered if an increase in tuberculin reactivity was inversely related to commonly used indices of asthma in a population of young adults who were BCG vaccinated at age 14. METHODS: Men and women aged 20-44 years, randomly selected from the general population, were tuberculin tested with the epinephrine-Pirquet method with Norwegian-produced synthetic medium tuberculin (n = 588). In addition they were interviewed using eight questions on asthma symptoms and medication. Lung function and bronchial responsiveness were also tested. RESULTS: Altogether 95% of those studied had been BCG vaccinated at age 14 (n = 558). In the 386 subjects with complete examinations, there was no relationship between a positive tuberculin reaction (> or = 4 mm) and asthma symptoms or use of asthma medication. Furthermore we did not observe any relationship between a positive tuberculin reaction and the level of forced expiratory volume (FEV1) or a positive bronchial responsiveness test, assessed as the percent of predicted of FEV1 and PD20
PubMed ID
11906365 View in PubMed
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Academic dissertations by dentists in Finland, 1891-1991, and in Finland, Norway, and Sweden, 1984-93.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211755
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Jun;54(3):182-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
M. Vehkalahti
E. Kihlberg
I. Rytömaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Jun;54(3):182-7
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Dentists - history - statistics & numerical data
Dentists, Women - history - statistics & numerical data
Dissertations, Academic as Topic - history
Education, Dental, Graduate - history - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Norway
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Dental education in the Nordic countries was founded in the late 1800s, but the doctor's degree in dentistry (Ph.D.) was established somewhat later. Since the first dissertation in Finland in 1891, a total of 204 doctoral dentist candidates had defended their Ph.D. theses by 1991, 50% of them during the most recent 12 years. Over the 100-year period, 54% of the dentists' Ph.D. theses in Finland were defended at the University of Helsinki, 27% at Turku, 14% at Kuopio, and 5% at Oulu. Women constituted a minority of the candidates (23%) during the first 90 years but 54% from 1982 to 1991. From 1984 to 1993 a total of 374 dentist candidates in Finland, Norway, and Sweden defended their Ph.D. theses. The mean ages of the candidates ranged from 37.7 to 41.7 years for men and from 40.6 to 43.2 years for women. In the 10-year period on average 53 doctor's degrees were received per institute in Sweden, compared with 28 in Finland and 27 in Norway. In all three countries about 6 of 100 graduates in 1980s received a doctor's degree in dentistry. Almost all of these Ph.D. theses were written in English and based on collections of articles. Female candidates dominated in Finland (56%), compared with 34% in Sweden and 26% in Norway, where, however, women's contribution increased most rapidly, being tripled from early 1980s to 1990s.
PubMed ID
8811141 View in PubMed
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Accelerometer-determined physical activity and self-reported health in a population of older adults (65-85 years): a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264724
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Hilde Lohne-Seiler
Bjorge H Hansen
Elin Kolle
Sigmund A Anderssen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Regression Analysis
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Report
Abstract
The link between physical activity (PA) and prevention of disease, maintenance of independence, and improved quality of life in older adults is supported by strong evidence. However, there is a lack of data on population levels in this regard, where PA level has been measured objectively. The main aims were therefore to assess the level of accelerometer-determined PA and to examine its associations with self-reported health in a population of Norwegian older adults (65-85 years).
This was a part of a national multicenter study. Participants for the initial study were randomly selected from the national population registry, and the current study included those of the initial sample aged 65-85 years. The ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer was used to measure PA for seven consecutive days. A questionnaire was used to register self-reported health. Univariate analysis of variance with Bonferroni adjustments were used for comparisons between multiple groups.
A total of 560 participants had valid activity registrations. Mean age (SD) was 71.8 (5.6) years for women (n=282) and 71.7 (5.2) years for men (n=278). Overall PA level (cpm) differed considerably between the age groups where the oldest (80-85 y) displayed a 50% lower activity level compared to the youngest (65-70 y). No sex differences were observed in overall PA within each age group. Significantly more men spent time being sedentary (65-69 and 70-74 years) and achieved more minutes of moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) (75-79 years) compared to women. Significantly more women (except for the oldest), spent more minutes of low-intensity PA compared to men. PA differed across levels of self-reported health and a 51% higher overall PA level was registered in those, with "very good health" compared to those with "poor/very poor health".
Norwegian older adults PA levels differed by age. Overall, the elderly spent 66% of their time being sedentary and only 3% in MVPA. Twenty one percent of the participants fulfilled the current Norwegian PA recommendations. Overall PA levels were associated with self-reported health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24673834 View in PubMed
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1915 records – page 1 of 192.