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Current trends in arctic medical research in the Nordic countries with special reference to Sweden

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94088
Source
Pages 8-11 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden did not establish the Nordic Council for Arctic Medical Research (NCAMR) until 1969, when a permanent Secretariat was organized at Oulu, Finland. The NCAMR may be regarded The Nordic countries with special reference to Sweden 9 as an expression of the wish to
  1 document  
Author
Linderholm, H
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden
Source
Pages 8-11 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic medical research
Denmark
Environmental contra-genetic factors
Ethnic minorities
Finland
Greenland
Human adaptability
Iceland
Lapps
Nordic Council for Arctic Medical Reserach (NCAMR)
Nordic countries
Norway
Sweden
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Source
Pages 515-517 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
are represented in the study are ~. Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The study was initiated and to a great extent ~by _the Nor~c c.ouncil of Ministers. The ""'lll~~cal Institute 10 Norway had main re- ~bility for organising and co-ordinating the PlllJCCt The ~thod applied, was to use data
  1 document  
Author
Jónsdóttir, S
Jonsdottir, S
Author Affiliation
Reykjavík Social Service Office, Reykjavík, Iceland
Source
Pages 515-517 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Denmark
Elderly women
Finland
Health
Iceland
Independent living
Nordic countries
Norway
Old women
Sweden
Abstract
Never before in world history have so many individuals been living alone and independently. The welfare state has made this development possible, and in the Nordic countries this is very much true for older women.
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The Groningen Activity Restriction Scale for measuring disability: Its utility in international comparisons

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14362
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1994 Aug;84(8):1270-1273
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
  1 website  
Author
Suurmeijer, TP
Doeglas, DM
Moum, T
Briançon, S
Krol, B
R. Sanderman, R
F. Guillemin
A. Bjelle
W J van den Heuvel
Author Affiliation
Northern Centre for Health Care Research, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1994 Aug;84(8):1270-1273
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Sweden
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - classification - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Disability Evaluation
Evaluation Studies
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
France
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Norway
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. The Groningen Activity Restriction Scale (GARS) is a non-disease-specific instrument to measure disability in activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). It was developed in studies of Dutch samples consisting of elderly or chronically ill people. The psychometric properties of the GARS demonstrated in these studies were highly satisfactory. This paper addresses the psychometric properties of the GARS across countries. METHODS. Data of 623 patients with recently diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis from four European countries were analyzed by means of a principal components analysis and a Mokken scale analysis for polychotomous items. RESULTS. The results of the analyses were highly satisfactory: there was one strong and reliable general factor representing one underlying dimension of disability in ADL and IADL, and there was a clear hierarchical ordering of the items included in the GARS. The validity of the GARS was strongly suggested by the pattern of associations of the GARS with age, sex, and other existing health status measures. CONCLUSIONS. The psychometric characteristics of the GARS, which measures disability in ADL and IADL simultaneously, make this instrument very useful for comparative research across countries.
PubMed ID
8059884 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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International comparisons of trends in cigarette smoking prevalence

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67959
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1989 Feb;79(2):152-157
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1989
  1 website  
Author
Pierce, JP
Author Affiliation
Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control, Rockville, MD 20857.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1989 Feb;79(2):152-157
Date
Feb-1989
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Norway
Sweden
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Australia
Canada
Comparative Study
Educational Status
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Norway
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Data on smoking prevalence since 1974 are presented for the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, Norway and Sweden. During this period, sex-specific prevalence has decreased in all the countries studied, with the exception of Norway, where women showed an increase. There was also a considerable decline in uptake of smoking by the young over this period, suggesting that the observed decline in prevalence is likely to continue. In the United States, the rate of decline in adult smoking prevalence has been linear. This linear pattern is probably similar in prevalence in most other countries studied, with the notable exception of Australia, which demonstrated no change for the majority of the period. Among the six countries studied, the United States had neither the lowest smoking prevalence nor the fastest rate of decline over the period. Differential patterns of change infer that the successful public health interventions in some countries are not being applied in others. While the lack of change in Australia prior to 1983 is surprising, this was followed by a sizable drop in smoking prevalence for both higher and lower educational groups in conjunction with the introduction of mass media-led antismoking campaigns. Most of the other countries report an ever increasing gap in prevalence between higher and lower educational groups. These findings suggest that all countries might benefit from a greater exchange of antismoking ideas and public health action.
PubMed ID
2913832 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Nationwide mammography screening registers: the best way to go for mortality evaluation - but there is no free lunch.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101745
Source
Acta Radiol. 2011 Apr 1;52(3):235
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2011
Author
Per Skaane
Source
Acta Radiol. 2011 Apr 1;52(3):235
Date
Apr-1-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - radiography
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Mammography
Mass Screening
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
RefSource: Acta Radiol. 2011 Apr 1;52(3):247
PubMed ID
21498355 View in PubMed
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Nationwide population-based Nordic screening mammography registers: the only key to final evaluation?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101744
Source
Acta Radiol. 2011 Apr 1;52(3):247
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2011

Polio Immunization in the Nordic countries

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102255
Source
Pages 613-616 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Arctic Medical Research vol. 53: Suppl. 2, pp. 613-616, 1994 Polio Immunization in the Nordic Countries Margareta Bottiger Dept ofEpidemiology, National Bacteriological Laboratory, Stockholm, Sweden i I ' Abstract: The Nordic countries, i.e. Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and
  1 document  
Author
Böttiger, M
Bottiger, M
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, National Bacteriological Laboratory, Stockholm, Sweden
Source
Pages 613-616 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Cases
Denmark
Epidemiology
Finland
Iceland
Immunization
Killed vaccine
Norway
Oral vaccine
Outbreak
Polio
Poliomyelitis
Poliovirus
Scandinavia
Sweden
Vaccine
Wild virus
Abstract
The Nordic countries, i.e., Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, together with Holland, have all continued to use the killed polio vaccine introduced in the middle of the 1950s, and they still use it today. In Denmark, combined vaccination has been practiced since 1966, starting with three doses of the killed vaccine and continuing with the oral vaccine. Norway used oral vaccine alone during the 14-year period from 1965 to 1979. In all these countries, the immunizations with the killed vaccine were immediately successful. Poliomyelitis was practically eliminated already in the beginning of the 1960s. After this initial successful period, the different countries experienced different events, from which valuable information can be drawn: (1) Nationwide vaccination with killed vaccine was highly effective. (2) It is of the utmost importance that the potency of the killed vaccine is high. (3) Oral vaccine may cause higher rates of vaccine-associated secondary cases than have been reported in general. (4) In the Nordic countries, the general circulation of wild virus appeared to cease simultaneously with the disease. (5) When virus is reintroduced into the country, unvaccinated groups are vulnerable. Outbreaks in unvaccinated "pockets" have occurred. This phenomenon, however, has also been experienced in countries using oral vaccine. (6) In Stockholm, both wild poliovirus and vaccine-like polio strains were isolated from the sewage water, indicating a constant import of both types of viruses. Virus isolations from thousands of patients with meningitis or diarrhea have been negative throughout the years.
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Re: Time trends in brain tumor incidence rates in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden, 1974-2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97280
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2010 May 19;102(10):741-2; author reply 742-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-19-2010

Re: Time trends in brain tumor incidence rates in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden, 1974-2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97281
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2010 May 19;102(10):740-1; author reply 742-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-19-2010
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):609-613
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1968
-Scandia includes the parts of Norway, Sweden, and Finland lying north of the Arctic circle. Inasmuch as this symposium deals with circumpolm health p~oblems and zoonoses in the Arctic, the ter- ritories under Norwegian sovereignty in these areas such as Bj0m0ya and Spitsberg- en (Svalbard) will also
  1 document  
Author
Hauge, S
Author Affiliation
Alaska
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):609-613
Date
Oct-1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Brucellosis - epidemiology
Carnivora
Cattle
Diphyllobothriasis - epidemiology
Diphyllobothrium
Dogs
Echinococcosis - epidemiology
Finland
Fishes
Food Contamination
Food Inspection
Foxes
Humans
Meat
Norway
Reindeer
Salmonella Infections, Animal - epidemiology
Sewage
Sweden
Trichinosis - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Bovine - epidemiology
Tularemia - epidemiology
Zoonoses - epidemiology
PubMed ID
5693139 View in PubMed
Documents

67-29-Zoonoses in Northern Fenno-Scandia.pdf

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