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Adherence to the New Nordic Diet during pregnancy and subsequent maternal weight development: a study conducted in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299175
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 06; 119(11):1286-1294
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elisabet R Hillesund
Andrew K Wills
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Elling Bere
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
1Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition,University of Agder,PO Box 422,4604 Kristiansand,Norway.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 06; 119(11):1286-1294
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child
Diet
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Male
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight
Pregnancy
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
The rising prevalence of overweight and obesity is a worldwide public health challenge. Pregnancy and beyond is a potentially important window for future weight gain in women. We investigated associations between maternal adherence to the New Nordic diet (NND) during pregnancy and maternal BMI trajectories from delivery to 8 years post delivery. Data are from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort. Pregnant women from all of Norway were recruited between 1999 and 2008, and 55 056 are included in the present analysis. A previously constructed diet score, NND, was used to assess adherence to the diet. The score favours intake of Nordic fruits, root vegetables, cabbages, potatoes, oatmeal porridge, whole grains, wild fish, game, berries, milk and water. Linear spline multi-level models were used to estimate the association. We found that women with higher adherence to the NND pattern during pregnancy had on average lower post-partum BMI trajectories and slightly less weight gain up to 8 years post delivery compared with the lower NND adherers. These associations remained after adjustment for physical activity, education, maternal age, smoking and parity (mean diff at delivery (high v. low adherers): -0·3 kg/m2; 95 % CI -0·4, -0·2; mean diff at 8 years: -0·5 kg/m2; 95 % CI -0·6, -0·4), and were not explained by differences in energy intake or by exclusive breast-feeding duration. Similar patterns of associations were seen with trajectories of overweight/obesity as the outcome. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the NND may have beneficial properties to long-term weight regulation among women post-partum.
PubMed ID
29770760 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotics, acetaminophen and infections during prenatal and early life in relation to type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300352
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 10 01; 47(5):1538-1548
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
German Tapia
Ketil Størdal
Karl Mårild
Christian R Kahrs
Torild Skrivarhaug
Pål R Njølstad
Geir Joner
Lars C Stene
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 10 01; 47(5):1538-1548
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acetaminophen - adverse effects
Adolescent
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Gastroenteritis - complications
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infection - complications
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Abstract
Infections in early life have been linked to type 1 diabetes (T1D) risk, but no previous study has comprehensively analysed exposure to antibiotics, acetaminophen and infections during pregnancy and early childhood in relation to offspring risk of T1D.
Participants in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (n?=?114 215 children, of whom 403 children were diagnosed with T1D) reported infections and medication use through repeated questionnaires from pregnancy until the children were 18?months old. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) for offspring T1D were estimated through Cox regression adjusted for child's sex, maternal age and parity, maternal T1D, smoking in pregnancy, education level, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and birthweight. Antibiotic use was also analysed in a population-based register cohort of 541 036 children of whom 836 developed T1D.
Hospitalization for gastroenteritis during the first 18?months of life was associated with increased risk (aHR 2.27, 95% CI 1.21 - 4.29, P?=?0.01) of T1D. Childhood infections not requiring hospitalization, or any kind of maternal infection during pregnancy, did not predict offspring risk of T1D. Antibiotic or acetaminophen use in pregnancy, or child`s use in early childhood, was not associated with risk of T1D.
Our study, which is population-based and the largest of its kind, did not find support for general early life infections, infection frequency or use of antibiotics or acetaminophen to play a major role in childhood T1D. Hospital admission for gastroenteritis was associated with T1D risk, but must be interpreted cautiously due to scarcity of cases.
PubMed ID
29868838 View in PubMed
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Anxiety, depression and relationship satisfaction in the pregnancy following stillbirth and after the birth of a live-born baby: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294808
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2018 01 24; 18(1):41
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-24-2018
Author
Ida Kathrine Gravensteen
Eva-Marie Jacobsen
Per Morten Sandset
Linda Bjørk Helgadottir
Ingela Rådestad
Leiv Sandvik
Øivind Ekeberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O box 1171, Blindern, 0318, Oslo, Norway. ida.gravensteen@gmail.com.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2018 01 24; 18(1):41
Date
01-24-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Birth Intervals - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Interpersonal Relations
Live Birth - psychology
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - psychology
Pregnant Women - psychology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sexual Partners - psychology
Stillbirth - psychology
Abstract
Experiencing a stillbirth can be a potent stressor for psychological distress in the subsequent pregnancy and possibly after the subsequent birth. The impact on women's relationship with her partner in the subsequent pregnancy and postpartum remains uncertain. The objectives of the study were 1) To investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depression in the pregnancy following stillbirth and assess gestational age at stillbirth and inter-pregnancy interval as individual risk factors. 2) To assess the course of anxiety, depression and satisfaction with partner relationship up to 3 years after the birth of a live-born baby following stillbirth.
This study is based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, a population-based pregnancy cohort. The sample included 901 pregnant women: 174 pregnant after a stillbirth, 362 pregnant after a live birth and 365 previously nulliparous. Anxiety and depression were assessed by short-form subscales of the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist, and relationship satisfaction was assessed by the Relationship Satisfaction Scale. These outcomes were measured in the third trimester of pregnancy and 6, 18 and 36 months postpartum. Logistic regression models were applied to study the impact of previous stillbirth on depression and anxiety in the third trimester of the subsequent pregnancy and to investigate gestational age and inter-pregnancy interval as potential risk factors.
Women pregnant after stillbirth had a higher prevalence of anxiety (22.5%) and depression (19.7%) compared with women with a previous live birth (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 5.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.90-10.32 and aOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.11-3.27) and previously nulliparous women (aOR 4.97, 95% CI 2.68-9.24 and aOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.08-3.36). Gestational age at stillbirth (>?30 weeks) and inter-pregnancy interval?
Notes
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PubMed ID
29361916 View in PubMed
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Association Between Antibiotics in the First Year of Life and Celiac Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301576
Source
Gastroenterology. 2019 06; 156(8):2217-2229
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2019
Author
Stine Dydensborg Sander
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Joseph A Murray
Øystein Karlstad
Steffen Husby
Ketil Størdal
Author Affiliation
Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; Department of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. Electronic address: stine.dydensborg.sander@rsyd.dk.
Source
Gastroenterology. 2019 06; 156(8):2217-2229
Date
06-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Celiac Disease - chemically induced - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Gastrointestinal Microbiome - drug effects
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The intestinal microbiota is believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, in addition to genetic variants and dietary gluten. The gut microbiota is strongly influenced by systemic antibiotics-especially in early life. We explored the association between exposure to a systemic antibiotic in the first year of life and risk of diagnosed celiac disease.
We performed an observational nationwide register-based cohort study. We included all children born in Denmark from 1995 through 2012 or Norway from 2004 through 2012. Children born in Denmark were followed until May 8, 2015 (age at end of follow-up was 2.3-20.3 years) and children born in Norway were followed until December 31, 2013 (age at end of follow-up was 1-10 years). We collected medical information from more than 1.7 million children, including 3346 with a diagnosis of celiac disease. Exposure to systemic antibiotics was defined as a dispensed systemic antibiotic in the first year of life.
Exposure to systemic antibiotics in the first year of life was positively associated with diagnosed celiac disease in the Danish and Norwegian cohorts (pooled odds ratio 1.26, 95% confidence interval 1.16-1.36). We found a dose-dependent relation between an increasing number of dispensed antibiotics and the risk of celiac disease (pooled odds ratio for each additional dispensed antibiotic 1.08, 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.11). No specific type of antibiotic or age period within the first year of life was prominent. Adjustment for hospital admissions with an infectious disease in the first year of life did not change the estimates; adjustment for the number of maternally reported infections in the child in 2 large sub-cohorts decreased the association slightly (pooled odds ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 0.98-1.39).
In a nationwide study of children in Denmark and Norway, we found exposure to systemic antibiotics in the first year of life to be associated with a later diagnosis of celiac disease. These findings indicate that childhood exposure to systemic antibiotics could be a risk factor for celiac disease.
PubMed ID
30836095 View in PubMed
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Association of Folic Acid Supplementation During Pregnancy With the Risk of Autistic Traits in Children Exposed to Antiepileptic Drugs In Utero.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303235
Source
JAMA Neurol. 2018 02 01; 75(2):160-168
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-01-2018
Author
Marte Bjørk
Bettina Riedel
Olav Spigset
Gyri Veiby
Eivind Kolstad
Anne Kjersti Daltveit
Nils Erik Gilhus
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
JAMA Neurol. 2018 02 01; 75(2):160-168
Date
02-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anticonvulsants - adverse effects
Autistic Disorder - etiology - prevention & control
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements
Epilepsy - drug therapy
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Norway
Outcome Assessment, Health Care
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - physiopathology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vitamin B Complex - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Strategies to prevent autism in children exposed to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy are important.
To explore whether folic acid supplementation and folate status in pregnancy are associated with reduced risk of autistic traits owing to in utero AED exposure.
The population-based, prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study approached Norwegian-speaking women attending routine ultrasonographic examinations from June 1999 through December 31, 2008 (163?844 of 277?702 women refused). No exclusion criteria were applied beyond language. Questionnaires during and after pregnancy, analysis of blood samples, and linkage to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway were performed. Children aged 18 to 36 months of women with available information on use of AEDs and of folic acid supplementation (n?=?104?946) were included in the analysis from March 1, 2016, through June 13, 2017.
Maternal folic acid supplementation 4 weeks before to 12 weeks after conception. Plasma folate concentration was analyzed at gestational weeks 17 to 19.
Autistic traits were evaluated using the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers and Social Communication Questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) for autistic traits in children by maternal use vs nonuse of folic acid supplements were adjusted for maternal health and socioeconomic factors. Folate concentrations and folic acid doses were associated with the degree of autistic traits.
The overall mean (SD) age of the 104?946 mothers of participating children was 29.8 (4.6) years, with complete information available for analysis in 103 868. Mean (SD) age of women with epilepsy who received AED treatment was 29.4 (4.9); women with epilepsy who did not receive AED treatment, 29.1 (4.9); and without epilepsy, 29.8 (4.6) years. In the 335 children exposed to AEDs, the risk for autistic traits was significantly higher at 18 months of age (adjusted OR [AOR], 5.9; 95% CI, 2.2-15.8) and 36 months of age (AOR, 7.9; 95% CI, 2.5-24.9) when their mothers had not used folic acid supplements compared with children of mothers who had used supplements. Among women without epilepsy, the corresponding risks were lower at 18 months of age (AOR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.2-1.4) and 36 months of age (AOR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.5-1.9); among the 389 children of women with untreated epilepsy, the corresponding risks were not significant at 18 months of age (AOR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.4-3.0) and 36 months of age (AOR, 2.5; 95% CI, 0.4-16.6). Degree of autistic traits was inversely associated with maternal plasma folate concentrations (ß?=?-0.3; P?=?.03) and folic acid doses (ß?=?-0.5; P?
Notes
CommentIn: JAMA Neurol. 2018 Feb 1;75(2):151-152 PMID 29279883
ErratumIn: JAMA Neurol. 2018 Apr 1;75(4):518 PMID 29482209
PubMed ID
29279889 View in PubMed
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Association of Maternal Psychosocial Stress With Increased Risk of Asthma Development in Offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301192
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2018 06 01; 187(6):1199-1209
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-01-2018
Author
Maria C Magnus
Rosalind J Wright
Espen Røysamb
Christine L Parr
Øystein Karlstad
Christian M Page
Per Nafstad
Siri E Håberg
Stephanie J London
Wenche Nystad
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2018 06 01; 187(6):1199-1209
Date
06-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - complications - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Mothers - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy - psychology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - psychology
Registries
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - drug therapy
Abstract
Prenatal maternal psychosocial stress might influence the development of childhood asthma. Evaluating paternal psychosocial stress and conducting a sibling comparison could provide further insight into the role of unmeasured confounding. We examined the associations of parental psychosocial stress during and after pregnancy with asthma at age 7 years in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (n = 63,626; children born in 2000-2007). Measures of psychosocial stress included lifetime major depressive symptoms, current anxiety/depression symptoms, use of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics, life satisfaction, relationship satisfaction, work stress, and social support. Childhood asthma was associated with maternal lifetime major depressive symptoms (adjusted relative risk (aRR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09, 1.30), in addition to symptoms of anxiety/depression during pregnancy (aRR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.29) and 6 months after delivery (aRR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.28). Maternal negative life events during pregnancy (aRR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.13) and 6 months after delivery (aRR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.18) were also associated with asthma. These associations were not replicated when evaluated within sibling groups. There were no associations with paternal psychosocial stress. In conclusion, maternal anxiety/depression and negative life events were associated with offspring asthma, but this might be explained by unmeasured maternal background characteristics that remain stable across deliveries.
PubMed ID
29244063 View in PubMed
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Complex patterns of concomitant medication use: A study among Norwegian women using paracetamol during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289785
Source
PLoS One. 2017; 12(12):e0190101
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Stefania Salvatore
Diana Domanska
Mollie Wood
Hedvig Nordeng
Geir Kjetil Sandve
Author Affiliation
Department of Informatics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2017; 12(12):e0190101
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acetaminophen - therapeutic use
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Drug Interactions
Female
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
Abstract
Studies on medication safety in pregnancy often rely on an oversimplification of medication use into exposed or non-exposed, without considering intensity and timing of use in pregnancy, or concomitant medication use. This study uses paracetamol in pregnancy as the motivating example to introduce a method of clustering medication exposures longitudinally throughout pregnancy. The aim of this study was to use hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) to better identify clusters of medication exposure throughout pregnancy.
Data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study was used to identify subclasses of women using paracetamol during pregnancy. HCA with customized distance measure was used to identify clusters of medication exposures in pregnancy among children at 18 months.
The pregnancies in the study (N = 9 778) were grouped in 5 different clusters depending on their medication exposure profile throughout pregnancy.
Using HCA, we identified and described profiles of women exposed to different medications in combination with paracetamol during pregnancy. Identifying these clusters allows researchers to define exposure in ways that better reflects real-world medication usage patterns. This method could be extended to other medications and used as pre-analysis for identifying risks associated with different profiles of exposure.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29284043 View in PubMed
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Dietary acrylamide intake during pregnancy and postnatal growth and obesity: Results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296662
Source
Environ Int. 2018 04; 113:325-334
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Manik Kadawathagedara
Jérémie Botton
Blandine de Lauzon-Guillain
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
Margaretha Haugen
Eleni Papadopoulou
Author Affiliation
INSERM, UMR1153 Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité Center (CRESS), Early determinants of the child's health and development Team (ORCHAD), Paris F-75014, France; Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. Electronic address: manik.kadawathagedara@inserm.fr.
Source
Environ Int. 2018 04; 113:325-334
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Adult
Child
Child Development - drug effects
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diet
Dietary Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Eating
Female
Food
Food Contamination
Humans
Logistic Models
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - chemically induced
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Abstract
Prenatal acrylamide exposure has been negatively associated with fetal growth but the association with child growth is unknown.
We studied the association between prenatal acrylamide exposure and child postnatal growth up to 8?years in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).
In 51,952 mother-child pairs from MoBa, acrylamide intake during pregnancy was estimated by combining maternal food intake with food concentrations of acrylamide. Mothers reported their child's weight and length/height up to 11 times between 6?weeks and 8?years. Weight and height growth trajectories were modelled using Jenss-Bayley's growth model. Logistic regression models were used to study the association with overweight/obese status at 3, 5 and 8?years, as identified using the International Obesity Task Force cut-offs. Linear mixed-effect models were used to explore associations with overall growth.
At 3?years, the adjusted odds ratios (95% Confidence Intervals (CI)) of being overweight/obese were 1.10 (1.02, 1.20), 1.12 (1.04, 1.22) and 1.21 (1.11, 1.31) by increasing prenatal acrylamide exposure quartile. Similar dose-response associations were found at 5 and 8?years. Acrylamide intake during pregnancy was associated with higher weight growth velocity in childhood. Children exposed at the highest level had 22?g (95% CI: 8, 37), 57?g (95% CI: 32, 81), and 194?g (95% CI: 110, 278) higher weight at 0.5, 2, and 8?years, respectively, compared to their low exposed peers.
Children prenatally exposed to acrylamide in the highest quartile experienced a moderate increase in weight growth velocity during early childhood that resulted in a moderately increased prevalence of overweight/obesity compared to peers in the lowest quartile. Our study is the first to link prenatal acrylamide exposure and postnatal growth.
PubMed ID
29398013 View in PubMed
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Does pregnancy alter life-course lipid trajectories? Evidence from the HUNT Study in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302991
Source
J Lipid Res. 2018 12; 59(12):2403-2412
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Amanda R Markovitz
Eirin B Haug
Julie Horn
Abigail Fraser
Corrie Macdonald-Wallis
Kate Tilling
Eric B Rimm
Stacey A Missmer
Paige L Williams
Pål R Romundstad
Bjørn O Åsvold
Janet W Rich-Edwards
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA amarkovitz@mail.havard.edu.
Source
J Lipid Res. 2018 12; 59(12):2403-2412
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Female
Humans
Lipids - blood
Middle Aged
Norway
Parity
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined the association between pregnancy and life-course lipid trajectories. Linked data from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway yielded 19,987 parous and 1,625 nulliparous women. Using mixed-effects spline models, we estimated differences in nonfasting lipid levels from before to after first birth in parous women and between parous and nulliparous women. HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) dropped by -4.2 mg/dl (95% CI: -5.0, -3.3) from before to after first birth in adjusted models, a 7% change, and the total cholesterol (TC) to HDL-C ratio increased by 0.18 (95% CI: 0.11, 0.25), with no change in non-HDL-C or triglycerides. Changes in HDL-C and the TC/HDL-C ratio associated with pregnancy persisted for decades, leading to altered life-course lipid trajectories. For example, parous women had a lower HDL-C than nulliparous women at the age of 50 years (-1.4 mg/dl; 95% CI: -2.3, -0.4). Adverse changes in lipids were greatest after first birth, with small changes after subsequent births, and were larger in women who did not breastfeed. Findings suggest that pregnancy is associated with long-lasting adverse changes in HDL-C, potentially setting parous women on a more atherogenic trajectory than prior to pregnancy.
PubMed ID
30314998 View in PubMed
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A Family Based Study of Carbon Monoxide and Nitric Oxide Signalling Genes and Preeclampsia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295318
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2018 01; 32(1):1-12
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Anna E Bauer
Christy L Avery
Min Shi
Clarice R Weinberg
Andrew F Olshan
Quaker E Harmon
Jingchun Luo
Jenny Yang
Tracy A Manuck
Michael C Wu
Nicholas Williams
Ralph McGinnis
Linda Morgan
Kari Klungsøyr
Lill Trogstad
Per Magnus
Stephanie M Engel
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2018 01; 32(1):1-12
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Carbon Monoxide - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Female
Gene Frequency - genetics
Genes - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genotyping Techniques
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Nitric Oxide - metabolism
Norway - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Pre-Eclampsia - genetics
Pregnancy
Signal Transduction - genetics
Abstract
Preeclampsia is thought to originate during placentation, with incomplete remodelling and perfusion of the spiral arteries leading to reduced placental vascular capacity. Nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) are powerful vasodilators that play a role in the placental vascular system. Although family clustering of preeclampsia has been observed, the existing genetic literature is limited by a failure to consider both mother and child.
We conducted a nested case-control study within the Norwegian Mother and Child Birth Cohort of 1545 case-pairs and 995 control-pairs from 2540 validated dyads (2011 complete pairs, 529 missing mother or child genotype). We selected 1518 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequency >5% in NO and CO signalling pathways. We used log-linear Poisson regression models and likelihood ratio tests to assess maternal and child effects.
One SNP met criteria for a false discovery rate Q-value
Notes
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PubMed ID
28881463 View in PubMed
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