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Acute stroke unit care combined with early supported discharge. Long-term effects on quality of life. A randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45787
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2004 Aug;18(5):580-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Hild Fjaertoft
Bent Indredavik
Roar Johnsen
Stian Lydersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience and Motion, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. hild.fjartoft@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2004 Aug;18(5):580-6
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cerebrovascular Accident - rehabilitation
Continuity of Patient Care
Early Ambulation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient care team
Patient Discharge
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present trial was to compare the effects of an extended stroke unit service (ESUS) with the effects of an ordinary stroke unit service (OSUS) on long-term quality of life (QoL). DESIGN: One year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial with 320 acute stroke patients allocated either to OSUS (160 patients) or ESUS (160 patients) with early supported discharge and follow-up by a mobile team. The intervention was a mobile team and close co-operation with the primary health care service. All assessments were blinded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Primary outcome of QoL in this paper was measured by the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) at 52 weeks. Secondary outcomes measured at 52 weeks were differences between the groups measured by the Frenchay Activity Index, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Scale, Mini-Mental State Score and the Caregivers Strain Index. RESULTS: The ESUS group had a significantly better QoL (mean score 78.9) assessed by global NHP after one year than the OSUS group (mean score 75.2) (p =0.048). There were no significant differences between the groups in the secondary outcomes, but a trend in favour of ESUS. Caregivers Strain Index showed a mean score of 23.3 in the ESUS group and 22.6 in the OSUS group (p=0.089). CONCLUSION: It seems that stroke unit treatment combined with early supported discharge in addition to reducing the length of hospital stay can improve long-term QoL. However, similar trials are necessary to confirm the benefit of this type of service.
PubMed ID
15293492 View in PubMed
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The association between patient safety culture and burnout and sense of coherence: A cross-sectional study in restructured and not restructured intensive care units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284643
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2016 Oct;36:26-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Anne Vifladt
Bjoerg O Simonsen
Stian Lydersen
Per G Farup
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2016 Oct;36:26-34
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - etiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - standards
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurses - psychology - standards
Patient Safety - standards
Safety Management - standards
Sense of Coherence
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To study the associations between registered nurses' (RNs) perception of the patient safety culture (safety culture) and burnout and sense of coherence, and to compare the burnout and sense of coherence in restructured and not restructured intensive care units (ICUs).
Cross-sectional study.
RNs employed at seven ICUs in six hospitals at a Norwegian Hospital Trust. One to four years before the study, three hospitals merged their general and medical ICUs into one general mixed ICU.
The safety culture, burnout and sense of coherence were measured with the questionnaires Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, Bergen Burnout Indicator and Sense of Coherence. Participant characteristics and working in restructured and not restructured ICUs were registered.
In total, 143/289(49.5%) RNs participated. A positive safety culture was statistically significantly associated with a low score for burnout and a strong sense of coherence. No statistically significant differences were found in burnout and sense of coherence between RNs in the restructured and not restructured ICUs.
In this study, a positive safety culture was associated with absence of burnout and high ability to cope with stressful situations. Burnout and sense of coherence were independent of the restructuring process.
PubMed ID
27212614 View in PubMed
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Association of Telomere Length With Myocardial Infarction: A Prospective Cohort From the Population Based HUNT 2 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283936
Source
Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2017 May - Jun;59(6):649-655
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ida Beate Øyen Østhus
Stian Lydersen
Håvard Dalen
Javaid Nauman
Ulrik Wisløff
Source
Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2017 May - Jun;59(6):649-655
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Genetic markers
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Norway - epidemiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Telomere - genetics
Telomere Homeostasis
Time Factors
Abstract
As possible markers of biological age, telomere length (TL) has been associated with age-related diseases such as myocardial infarction (MI) with conflicting findings. We sought to assess the relationship between TL and risk of future MI in 915 healthy participants (51.7% women) 65 years or older from a population-based prospective cohort (the HUNT 2 study, Norway). Mean TL was measured by quantitative PCR expressed as relative T (telomere repeat copy number) to S (single copy gene number) ratio, and log-transformed. During a mean follow up of 13.0 (SD, 3.2) years and 11,923 person-years, 82 participants were diagnosed with MI. We used Cox proportional hazard regressions to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Relative TL was associated with age in women (P=0.01), but not in men (P=0.43). Using relative TL as a continuous variable, we observed a higher risk of MI in participants with longer telomeres with HRs of 2.46 (95% CI; 1.13 to 4.54) in men, and 2.93 (95% CI; 1.41 to 6.10) in women. Each 1-SD change in relative TL was associated with an HR of 1.54 (95% CI; 1.15 to 2.06) and 1.67 (95% CI; 1.18 to 2.37) in men and women, respectively. Compared with the bottom tertile of relative TL, HR of incident MI in top tertile was 2.71 (95% CI; 1.25 to 5.89) in men, and 3.65 (95% CI; 1.35 to 9.90) in women. Longer telomeres in healthy participants 65 years or older are associated with a high risk of incident MI. Future large scale prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and explore the potential association between TL and MI.
PubMed ID
28442329 View in PubMed
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Associations between high levels of conduct problems and co-occurring problems among the youngest boys and girls in schools: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119202
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2013 Aug;67(4):225-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Bente Kirkhaug
May Britt Drugli
Stian Lydersen
Willy-Tore Mørch
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Institute of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway. bente.kirkhaug@ntnu.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2013 Aug;67(4):225-32
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Schools
Social Behavior
Abstract
Few studies have focused on conduct problems and co-occurring problems among the youngest children in schools, such as social, internalizing and attention problems. In particular, there is a lack of studies that differentiate between boys and girls in terms of such problems.
The aim of the current study was to test associations between conduct problems and social, internalizing and attention problems, as well as adaptive school functioning, which was rated by the teachers of boys and girls in grades 1-3.
In a cross-sectional study, 103 boys and 108 girls in grades 1-3 at six schools participated in a national Norwegian study of child conduct problems in the normal population. Linear regression analysis was used to test the associations between conduct problems, social skills, problems of internalization, attention problems and adaptation to school among boys and girls.
There were significant associations between high levels of conduct problems and social skills problems, attention problems and low adaptive school functioning scores among boys and girls. Attention problems had the most powerful associations with conduct problems for both genders.
Young schoolchildren with high levels of conduct problems also had co-occurring problems. Schools and teachers need to adopt a comprehensive approach to help these children during their first years in school.
PubMed ID
23126480 View in PubMed
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Associations Between Parental Attachment and Course of Depression Between Adolescence and Young Adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275633
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2015 Aug;46(4):632-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Tea Agerup
Stian Lydersen
Jan Wallander
Anne Mari Sund
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2015 Aug;46(4):632-42
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Father-Child Relations
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mother-Child Relations - psychology
Norway
Peer Group
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Psychometrics
Reactive Attachment Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Statistics as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
A study of the associations of maternal, paternal and peer attachment with the course of depression from adolescence to young adulthood. In the Youth and Mental Health study 242 adolescents completed the Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime version for depressive disorders at age 15 and 20. Attachment was measured with the inventory for parent and peer attachment, separately for mother, father, and peers, at age 15. Multinomial logistic regression, indicated insecure attachment relationships with both parents, but not with peers, and were associated with the course of depression. Less secure attachment to mothers was associated with becoming depressed. Less secure attachment to both parents was associated with becoming well and remaining depressed. These results suggest attachment relationships with parents as potential influences on the course of depression and may provide important framework for clinical work with adolescents and young adults.
PubMed ID
25319511 View in PubMed
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Bimanual Fine Motor Function (BFMF) Classification in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Aspects of Construct and Content Validity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277109
Source
Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2016;36(1):1-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Ann-Kristin G Elvrum
Guro L Andersen
Kate Himmelmann
Eva Beckung
Ann-Marie Öhrvall
Stian Lydersen
Torstein Vik
Source
Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2016;36(1):1-16
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebral Palsy - classification - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Hand - physiopathology
Hand Strength
Humans
Male
Motor Skills - classification
Norway
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
The Bimanual Fine Motor Function (BFMF) is currently the principal classification of hand function recorded by the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe (SCPE) register. The BFMF is used in a number of epidemiological studies, but has not yet been validated.
To examine aspects of construct and content validity of the BFMF.
Construct validity of the BFMF was assessed by comparison with the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) using register-based data from 539 children born 1999-2003 (304 boys; 4-12 years). The high correlation with the MACS (Spearman's rho = 0.89, CI: 0.86-0.91, p
PubMed ID
25374154 View in PubMed
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Births and ectopic pregnancies in a large cohort of women tested for Chlamydia trachomatis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163762
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2007 Oct;34(10):739-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Inger Johanne Bakken
Finn Egil Skjeldestad
Stian Lydersen
Svein Arne Nordbø
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, SINTEF Health Research, Trondheim, Norway. inger.bakken@sintef.no
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2007 Oct;34(10):739-43
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chlamydia Infections - complications - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - isolation & purification
Cohort Studies
Female
Fertility
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
Live Birth
Mass Screening
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - microbiology
Pregnancy, Ectopic - epidemiology - microbiology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Recent studies show divergent results concerning the risk of ectopic pregnancy following Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection.
Our goal was to investigate future reproductive health outcomes (births and ectopic pregnancies) among women tested for CT.
Our cohort consisted of 20,762 women born during 1970-1984 who were tested for CT during 1990-2003. We linked CT data to data on ectopic pregnancies and births during 1990-2004. Cox regression with time-dependent covariates was used to assess the association between CT history and births/ectopic pregnancies adjusted for age at first test. Analyses with ectopic pregnancy as outcome were also adjusted for parity.
We observed 9.6 births per 100 person-years of observation among women with negative tests only and 10.2 per 100 person-years among women with at least 1 positive test (hazard ratio adjusted for age at first test, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.01-1.12). Ectopic pregnancy incidence rates were higher for women with positive test(s) compared with women with negative test only (0.24 vs. 0.13 per 100 person-years; hazard ratio adjusted for age at first test and parity, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.27-2.60). Among women with at least 1 registered pregnancy, the adjusted hazard ratio was 2.03; 95% CI, 1.28-3.22).
Although women diagnosed with CT were at higher risk for ectopic pregnancy than women with negative test results only, our study suggest that their fertility prospects were better than they would have been had CT screening not been implemented in this population. Opportunistic CT screening is an appropriate method for maintaining female reproductive health.
PubMed ID
17479068 View in PubMed
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Changes in patient safety culture after restructuring of intensive care units: Two cross-sectional studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279445
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2016 Feb;32:58-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Anne Vifladt
Bjoerg O Simonsen
Stian Lydersen
Per G Farup
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2016 Feb;32:58-65
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurses - psychology
Organizational Culture
Patient Safety
Safety Management
Abstract
Compare changes in registered nurses' perception of the patient safety culture in restructured and not restructured intensive care units during a four-year period.
Two cross-sectional surveys were performed, in 2008/2009 (time 1) and 2012/2013 (time 2). During a period of 0-3 years after time 1, three of six hospitals merged their general and medical intensive care units (restructured). The other hospitals maintained their structure of the intensive care units (not restructured).
Intensive care units in hospitals at one Norwegian hospital trust.
The safety culture was measured with Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture.
At times 1 and 2, 217/302 (72%) and 145/289 (50%) registered nurses participated. Restructuring was negatively associated with change in the safety culture, in particular, the dimensions of the safety culture within the unit level. The dimensions most vulnerable for restructuring were manager expectations and actions promoting safety, teamwork within hospital units and staffing.
In this study, the restructuring of intensive care units was associated with a negative impact on the safety culture. When restructuring, the management should be particularly aware of changes in the safety culture dimensions manager expectations and actions promoting safety, teamwork within hospital units and staffing.
PubMed ID
26604040 View in PubMed
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Child maltreatment and quality of life: a study of adolescents in residential care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277793
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2016 May 10;14:74
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2016
Author
Hanne Klæboe Greger
Arne Kristian Myhre
Stian Lydersen
Thomas Jozefiak
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2016 May 10;14:74
Date
May-10-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Quality of Life - psychology
Residential Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Self Concept
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Childhood maltreatment is an important risk factor for mental and physical health problems. Adolescents living in residential youth care (RYC) have experienced a high rate of childhood maltreatment and are a high-risk group for psychiatric disorders. Quality of life (QoL) is a subjective, multidimensional concept that goes beyond medical diagnoses. There is a lack of research regarding the associations between childhood maltreatment and QoL. In the present study, we compare self-reported QoL between adolescents in RYC in Norway with and without maltreatment histories, and adolescents from the general population. We also study the impact of number of types of adversities on QoL.
Adolescents aged 12-23 years living in RYC in Norway were invited to participate in the study; 400 participated, yielding a response rate of 67 %. Maltreatment histories were assessed through interviews with trained research assistants, and completed by 335 adolescents. Previous exposure to maltreatment was reported by 237 adolescents. The Questionnaire for Measuring Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents (KINDL-R) was used. Nonexposed peers in RYC (n?=?98) and a sample of adolescents from the general population (n?=?1017) were used for comparison. General linear model analyses (ANCOVA) were conducted with five KINDL-R life domains as dependent variables. Linear regression was used to study the effect of number of types of adversities.
Exposed adolescents in RYC reported poorer QoL than peers in control groups. Compared with nonexposed peers in RYC, the 95 % confidence intervals for mean score differences on the KINDL-R subdomains (0-100 scale) were 1.9-11.4 (Physical Well-being), 2.2-11.1 (Emotional Well-being), -0.7-10.0 (Self-esteem), and 1.8-10.9 (Friends). Compared with the general population sample, the 95 % confidence intervals for mean score differences were 9.7-17.6 (Physical Well-being), 7.9-15.3 (Emotional Well-being), 3.6-12.5 (Self-esteem), and 5.3-12.8 (Friends). Number of types of adversities was associated with a poorer QoL score on all subdomains (Physical- and Emotional Well-being, Self-esteem, Friends, and School).
Childhood maltreatment was associated with a poorer QoL score. We suggest the use of QoL and maltreatment measures for all children and adolescents in RYC.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27161357 View in PubMed
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Chronic pain and pain-related disability across psychiatric disorders in a clinical adolescent sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259536
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:272
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Wenche L Mangerud
Ottar Bjerkeset
Stian Lydersen
Marit S Indredavik
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:272
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Chronic Pain - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Disability Evaluation
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Norway
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Abstract
People who suffer from psychiatric disorders are burdened with a high prevalence of chronic illnesses and pain, but evidence on pain prevalence among adolescents with psychiatric disorders is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and location of self-reported chronic pain and pain-related disability in adolescent psychiatric patients.
This study was part of the larger Health Survey administered at the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) at St. Olav's University Hospital, in Trondheim, Norway. All patients aged 13-18 years who visited the CAP clinic at least once between February 15, 2009 and February 15, 2011 were invited to participate. A total of 717 (43.5% of eligible/invited patients) participated; of these, 566 were diagnosed with one or more psychiatric disorders. The adolescents completed a questionnaire, which included questions about pain and pain-related disability. Clinical diagnoses were classified by a clinician according to International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th revision criteria.
In adolescents with psychiatric disorders, 70.4% reported chronic pain, and 37.3% experienced chronic pain in three or more locations (multisite pain). Chronic musculoskeletal pain was the most prevalent type of pain (57.7%). Pain-related disability was found in 22.2% of the sample. The frequency of chronic pain and multisite pain increased with age, and girls reported a higher frequency of chronic pain, multisite pain and pain-related disability than boys did. There was an increased risk of chronic pain among adolescents with mood or anxiety disorders versus those with hyperkinetic disorders, yet this was not present after adjusting for sex. Comorbidity between hyperkinetic and mood or anxiety disorders involved an increased risk of pain-related disability.
In this study, seven out of 10 adolescents with psychiatric disorders reported chronic pain. These findings indicate the importance of early detection of chronic pain in adolescents with psychiatric disorders, to provide targeted treatment and reduce poor long-term outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
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