Skip header and navigation

Refine By

61 records – page 1 of 7.

Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1986 Jun 10;106(16):1379-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-1986

[Abdominal injuries after blunt trauma]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12141
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Sep 30;110(23):2994-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1990
Author
A. Nesbakken
F. Naess
K. Solheim
J. Pillgram-Larsen
T. Gerner
J O Stadaas
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk avdeling, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Sep 30;110(23):2994-8
Date
Sep-30-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - etiology - surgery
Accidents, Occupational
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Athletic Injuries - diagnosis - etiology - surgery
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Laparotomy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - diagnosis - etiology - surgery
Abstract
We present a series of 331 patients admitted to hospital in 1980-87 with abdominal injuries after blunt trauma. The patients included 230 males and 101 females. The median age was 29 years. More than half of the patients were injured in traffic accidents. 11% were transferred to our Trauma Center from other hospitals, median five hours after the accident. A doctor-manned helicopter transported 52 patients (18%) directly to our hospital. 70% had extra-abdominal injuries as well. A minimum of 20% were intoxicated by alcohol and/or drugs. Severe injuries (AIS greater than 3) were present in 46%. 168 patients underwent laparotomy, in 56% within two hours of admission. In 27 of the 168 laparotomized patients (16%) no intraabdominal injury was encountered that needed repair.
PubMed ID
2237848 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accident research ought to be given priority].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232446
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1988 Sep 30;108(27):2241
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1988
Author
K. Solheim
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1988 Sep 30;108(27):2241
Date
Sep-30-1988
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Norway
Research
PubMed ID
3206427 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1967 Sep 15;87(18):1484-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1967
Author
K. Solheim
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1967 Sep 15;87(18):1484-5
Date
Sep-15-1967
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aprotinin - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pancreatitis - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
PubMed ID
5301240 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A national registry for cholecystectomy. Quality assurance with practical consequences?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214557
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Aug 10;115(18):2236-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1995
Author
T. Buanes
O. Mjåland
A. Waage
K. Solheim
A E Faerden
Author Affiliation
Gastroenterologisk avdeling, Kirurgisk klinikk, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Aug 10;115(18):2236-9
Date
Aug-10-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cholecystectomy - adverse effects - mortality - standards
Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic - adverse effects - mortality - standards
Databases, Factual
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries
Abstract
Altogether 2,120 patients have been enrolled in the Norwegian Cholecystectomy Registry during the first 18 months after it was established. 1,699 patients (80%) were operated on laparoscopically. In 174 (10.2%) the operation was changed to an open procedure. 421 (20%) were operated on primarily using an open technique. The main quality problems were mortality (1.2%) and injuries of the common bile duct (0.95%) associated with open cholecystectomy. These frequencies are far above the values stated in available literature, and two interpretations are possible: Only the best results tend to be published internationally, and our results may be representative for the national average frequencies of serious complications in other countries too. On the other hand, the present results may disclose inadequate quality insufficiency and a need for improvement. The possible actions seem to be: Firstly, to try harder to avoid open cholecystectomy in seriously ill patients (ASA 3-4). If possible, they should not be operated on at all. When surgery is essential, a laparoscopic technique seems to cause less cardiopulmonary complications. Secondly, an improved dissection technique in open (and laparoscopic) surgery is necessary in order to reduce the frequency of injuries of the common bile duct.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Sep 10;115(21):2694-57570484
PubMed ID
7652718 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jan 10;120(1):128
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2000
Author
K. Solheim
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jan 10;120(1):128
Date
Jan-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Morbidity
Norway - epidemiology
Organizations, Nonprofit
Patients
Societies
PubMed ID
10815509 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Attitude of the public to autopsy. A questionnaire study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220491
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Aug 30;113(20):2583-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1993
Author
T. Wisborg
G. Brattebø
K. Solheim
N. Oyen
Author Affiliation
Anestesiavdelingen, Hammerfest sykehus.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Aug 30;113(20):2583-6
Date
Aug-30-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Death
Autopsy - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Abstract
A high autopsy rate is a requirement for confirming or correcting clinical diagnoses and for providing opportunities for medical education on pre- and postgraduate level. A telephone survey was conducted to obtain information about the opinion of the Norwegian public on this matter. A randomised sample of 1,050 persons over 15 years of age were asked whether they would consent to autopsy if a close family member died in a hospital. Of the 954 (91%) who agreed to answer, 86% (95% CI 84-89) would consent, while 14% (95% CI 11-16) were unsure or would object. Demographical background variables did not significantly influence the response. When asked if they would give prior consent to an autopsy on themselves, should they die in a hospital, 84% (95% CI 82-87) said they would agree, while 16% (95% CI 13-18) were unsure or would object. Age between 31-50 years, male sex and married civil status significantly increased the likelihood of a positive attitude towards autopsy. The survey revealed a generally favourable attitude in the population towards autopsy. This positive confidence has to be maintained through careful talks with relatives about autopsy, and arrangements for relatives to be informed of the result of an autopsy.
PubMed ID
8236181 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1978 Oct 30;98(30):1530-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1978
Author
K. Solheim
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1978 Oct 30;98(30):1530-2
Date
Oct-30-1978
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bed Occupancy
Hospital Departments
Humans
Length of Stay
Norway
Surgery Department, Hospital
PubMed ID
725867 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bile duct injury in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214153
Source
Int Surg. 1995 Oct-Dec;80(4):361-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Solheim
T. Buanes
Author Affiliation
Gastroenterological Surgical Department, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int Surg. 1995 Oct-Dec;80(4):361-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cholecystectomy - statistics & numerical data
Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic - instrumentation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Common Bile Duct - injuries - surgery
Female
Hepatic Duct, Common - injuries - surgery
Humans
Intraoperative Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Abstract
Bile duct injuries in laparoscopic cholecystectomy are briefly reviewed. The Norwegian National Cholecystectomy Registry was started on April 1, 1993, to collect data from most Norwegian surgical departments. in the period April 1, 1993-May 31, 1995, common bile duct (CBD) injuries necessitating treatment were reported in 0.61% of 2,612 laparoscopic cholecystectomies and in 0.74% of 674 open cholecystectomies. Early diagnosis is mandatory and the treatment is then simple. Delayed diagnosis is dangerous and the treatment may then be difficult. This field seems to show a difference between publications and the real world.
PubMed ID
8740685 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bile leak after cholecystectomy significance and treatment: results from the National Norwegian Cholecystectomy Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211504
Source
Int Surg. 1996 Jul-Sep;81(3):276-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Buanes
A. Waage
O. Mjåland
K. Solheim
Author Affiliation
Gastroenterological Surgical Department, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int Surg. 1996 Jul-Sep;81(3):276-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biliary Fistula - etiology - mortality - surgery
Cause of Death
Cholecystectomy
Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic
Cholelithiasis - mortality - surgery
Common Bile Duct - injuries - surgery
Female
Gallstones - mortality - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Postoperative Complications - etiology - mortality - surgery
Reoperation
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
From April 1993 to July 1995, altogether 3860 procedures were enrolled in the Norwegian National Cholecystectomy Registry (NNCR), 777 (20.2%) being open operations. 3083 (79.8%) were initiated laparoscopically, 313 (10.2%) of these converted to open technique. Mortality within 30 days after open cholecystectomy was 1.9%, after a converted procedure 1.0% and 0.14% after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (p
PubMed ID
9028989 View in PubMed
Less detail

61 records – page 1 of 7.