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51 records – page 1 of 6.

ApoB but not LDL-cholesterol is reduced by exercise training in overweight healthy men. Results from the 1-year randomized Oslo Diet and Exercise Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162331
Source
J Intern Med. 2007 Aug;262(2):235-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
I. Holme
A T Høstmark
S A Anderssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sports Sciences, Oslo, Norway. Ingar.Holme@nih.no
Source
J Intern Med. 2007 Aug;262(2):235-43
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Apolipoproteins - blood
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Diet Therapy - methods
Exercise Therapy - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Overweight - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
(i) To estimate changes in apoB and apoB/apoA-I, reflecting the balance between atherogenic and anti-atherogenic lipoprotein particles, by exercise training and compare with changes in LDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratio, and (ii) To compare strengths of relationships between physical fitness and various lipoprotein variables.
The study was a 1-year open randomized trial comprising 219 healthy middle-aged subjects aged 40-49 years who were allocated to exercise or no exercise, dietary advice or no advice in a 2 x 2 factorial design. This study includes 188 men who completed the trial, 45 to diet, 48 to exercise, 58 to diet + exercise and 37 to control.
Exercise; supervised endurance exercise three times a week. Diet; reduce weight, increase intake of fish and reduce total fat intake.
One-year change in apoB and apoB/apoA-I ratio.
Exercisers decreased their ApoB and ApoB/ApoA-I values significantly compared to non-exercisers. LDL-C was not, but LDL-C/HDL-C was marginally but statistically significantly reduced by exercise. One-year change in ApoB and ApoB/ApoA-I correlated more strongly to 1-year changes in physical fitness than LDL-C or LDL-C/HDL-C. Adjusting for changes in LDL-C or LDL-C/HDL-C did not influence the correlation between changes in fitness and ApoB or ApoB/ApoA-I. However, adjusting for changes in ApoB or ApoB/ApoA-I wiped out the correlation between change in fitness and LDL-C or LDL-C/HDL-C. Relationships weakened when adjusting for changes in waist circumference, but Apo B or ApoB/ApoA-I still correlated significantly to changes in fitness.
Physical exercise reduced the atherogenic burden as experienced by the reduction in apoB or apoB/apoA-I levels, but not by LDL-C in healthy middle-aged men. Possibly, regular physical activity might increase the LDL-C particle size, thereby making LDL less atherogenic. Monitoring of apolipoproteins rather than the cholesterol moiety of lipoproteins might improve the assessment of lipoprotein changes after exercise training.
PubMed ID
17645591 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between blood pressure and serum cholesterol in healthy men: the Oslo study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56023
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1978 Jun;32(2):117-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978
Author
I. Hjermann
A. Helgeland
I. Holme
P G Lund-Larsen
P. Leren
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1978 Jun;32(2):117-23
Date
Jun-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Blood pressure
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Statistics
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The association between serum cholesterol and blood pressure (BP) has been studied in 16 525 men. The study reveals that these Oslo men in their forties present with a serum cholesterol value which is on average 0.71 mmol/l (27.4 mg/100 ml) higher at diastolic BP greater than 110 mmHg than at BP less than 70 mmHg. According to earlier studies in Oslo, this cholesterol difference alone imparts a 10-year myocardial infarction morbidity difference of 25--30%. These findings might be of practical importance for epidemiological studies and for preventive measures against the two factors. The influence of other variables on the association between blood pressure and cholesterol has been studied in a multivariate analysis. Of these variables, only body mass index and serum triglycerides significantly influence the relationship between blood pressure and cholesterol, whereas age, cigarette smoking, non-fasting blood sugar, season, socioeconomic status, and physical activity at work and leisure do not influence the correlation.
PubMed ID
681585 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Cholesterol lowering therapy after myocardial infarction. Consequences of the CARE study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54500
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jun 20;117(16):2341-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1997
Author
J E Otterstad
E. Hexeberg
I. Holme
I. Hjermann
Author Affiliation
Hjerteseksjonen, Vestfold Sentralsykehus, Tønsberg.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jun 20;117(16):2341-4
Date
Jun-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aftercare
Aged
Anticholesteremic Agents - administration & dosage
Cause of Death
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - prevention & control
Norway - epidemiology
Pravastatin - administration & dosage
Recurrence
Abstract
In the recently published CARE-study, 4,159 patients aged 21-75 years were included and randomised to treatment with pravastatin 40 mg once daily or placebo 3-20 months following a myocardial infarction. Inclusion criteria were a total cholesterol
PubMed ID
9265282 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coronary risk and socio-economic status, the Oslo study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55999
Source
Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1979;626:33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979

[Coronary risk factors and socioeconomic status. The Oslo study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56059
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1977 Sep 30;97(27):1380-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1977

Coronary risk factors and socioeconomic status. The Oslo study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56099
Source
Lancet. 1976 Dec 25;2(8000):1396-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-25-1976
Author
I. Holme
A. Helgeland
I. Hjermann
P G Lund-Larsen
P. Leren
Source
Lancet. 1976 Dec 25;2(8000):1396-8
Date
Dec-25-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Body constitution
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Educational Status
Humans
Income
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Recreation
Risk
Smoking
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Coronary heart-disease (C.H.D.) had been reviewed as a "manager's disease". However, deaths from C.H.D. are now said to be more common in groups from the lower social classes than in those of higher socioeconomic status. We have examined wheather these differences in C.H.D. mortality can be explained by differences in the conventional risk factors for C.H.D.
PubMed ID
63860 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coronary risk factors and their possible causal role in the development of coronary heart disease: the Oslo study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55835
Source
J Oslo City Hosp. 1982 Jul-Aug;32(7-8):80-105
Publication Type
Article

Coronary risk factors in various occupational groups: the Oslo study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27699
Source
Br J Prev Soc Med. 1977 Jun;31(2):96-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1977
Author
I. Holme
A. Helgeland
I. Hjermann
P. Leren
P G Lund-Larsen
Source
Br J Prev Soc Med. 1977 Jun;31(2):96-100
Date
Jun-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupations
Risk
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Coronary risk factors (CRF) have been recorded for nearly 15 000 men aged between 40 and 49 living in Oslo in 1972. These data are matched with the 1970 census data for Norway so as to analyse CRF within various occupational groups. A fairly good agreement between mortality statistics for Norway and CRF was found in many occupations. For instance, persons in pedagogical work have low total mortality rates consistent with their low coronary risk factors. Taxi and busdrivers, on the other hand, have been reported to have mortality rates from lung cancer and coronary heart disease consistent with their high smoking prevalence, serum triglycerides, and cholesterol levels.
PubMed ID
884402 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of coronary risk factors in young Oslo males. A comparison between a survey in 40 year old men and the Oslo Study in 1972/73.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55569
Source
J Oslo City Hosp. 1987 May;37(5):49-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1987

51 records – page 1 of 6.