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Adherence of pregnant women to Nordic dietary guidelines in relation to postpartum weight retention: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256846
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anne von Ruesten
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Kirsten Mehlig
Anna Winkvist
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Anne.Lise.Brantsaeter@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:75
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Weight
Diet Surveys
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Postpartum Period - psychology
Pregnancy
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Pregnancy is a major life event for women and often connected with changes in diet and lifestyle and natural gestational weight gain. However, excessive weight gain during pregnancy may lead to postpartum weight retention and add to the burden of increasing obesity prevalence. Therefore, it is of interest to examine whether adherence to nutrient recommendations or food-based guidelines is associated with postpartum weight retention 6 months after birth.
This analysis is based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Diet during the first 4-5 months of pregnancy was assessed by a food-frequency questionnaire and maternal weight before pregnancy as well as in the postpartum period was assessed by questionnaires. Two Healthy Eating Index (HEI) scores were applied to measure compliance with either the official Norwegian food-based guidelines (HEI-NFG) or the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (HEI-NNR) during pregnancy. The considered outcome, i.e. weight retention 6 months after birth, was modelled in two ways: continuously (in kg) and categorically (risk of substantial postpartum weight retention, i.e. =?5% gain to pre-pregnancy weight). Associations between the HEI-NFG and HEI-NNR score with postpartum weight retention on the continuous scale were estimated by linear regression models. Relationships of both HEI scores with the categorical outcome variable were evaluated using logistic regression.
In the continuous model without adjustment for gestational weight gain (GWG), the HEI-NFG score but not the HEI-NNR score was inversely related to postpartum weight retention. However, after additional adjustment for GWG as potential intermediate the HEI-NFG score was marginally inversely and the HEI-NNR score was inversely associated with postpartum weight retention. In the categorical model, both HEI scores were inversely related with risk of substantial postpartum weight retention, independent of adjustment for GWG.
Higher adherence to either the official Norwegian food guidelines or possibly also to Nordic Nutrition Recommendations during pregnancy appears to be associated with lower postpartum weight retention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24456804 View in PubMed
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Association between intake of artificially sweetened and sugar-sweetened beverages and preterm delivery: a large prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122026
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):552-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Linda Englund-Ögge
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margareta Haugen
Verena Sengpiel
Ali Khatibi
Ronny Myhre
Solveig Myking
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Marian Kacerovsky
Roy M Nilsen
Bo Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. linda.englund-ogge@vgregion.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):552-9
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Norway
Obstetric Labor, Premature - etiology
Overweight - complications
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Single Person
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweetening Agents - adverse effects
Thinness - complications
Abstract
Artificially sweetened (AS) and sugar-sweetened (SS) beverages are commonly consumed during pregnancy. A recent Danish study reported that the daily intake of an AS beverage was associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery.
We examined the intake of AS and SS beverages in pregnant women to replicate the Danish study and observe whether AS intake is indeed associated with preterm delivery.
This was a prospective study of 60,761 pregnant women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Intakes of carbonated and noncarbonated AS and SS beverages and use of artificial sweeteners in hot drinks were assessed by a self-reported food-frequency questionnaire in midpregnancy. Preterm delivery was the primary outcome, and data were obtained from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry.
Intakes of both AS and SS beverages increased with increasing BMI and energy intake and were higher in women with less education, in daily smokers, and in single women. A high intake of AS beverages was associated with preterm delivery; the adjusted OR for those drinking >1 serving/d was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.24). Drinking >1 serving of SS beverages per day was also associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery (adjusted OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.45). The trend tests were positive for both beverage types.
This study suggests that a high intake of both AS and SS beverages is associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery.
Notes
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Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jan;97(1):22423283681
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PubMed ID
22854404 View in PubMed
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Associations of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with pregnancy outcome and postpartum weight retention: a prospective observational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260815
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:201
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Margaretha Haugen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Anna Winkvist
Lauren Lissner
Jan Alexander
Bente Oftedal
Per Magnus
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:201
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body mass index
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Emergencies
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Institute of Medicine (U.S.)
Live Birth - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Parity
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Thinness - epidemiology
United States
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with pregnancy complications, and Norwegian Health Authorities have adopted the GWG recommendations of the US Institute of Medicine and National Research Council (IOM). The aim of this study was to evaluate if a GWG outside the IOM recommendation in a Norwegian population is associated with increased risk of pregnancy complications like hypertension, low and high birth weight, preeclampsia, emergency caesarean delivery, and maternal post-partum weight retention (PPWR) at 6 and 18 months.
This study was performed in 56 101 pregnant women included in the prospective national Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) in the years 1999 to 2008. Women who delivered a singleton live born child during gestational week 37 to 42 were included. Maternal prepregnant and postpartum weight was collected from questionnaires at 17th week of gestation and 6 and 18 months postpartum.
A weight gain less than the IOM recommendations (GWG??IOM rec.) significantly increased the risk of pregnancy hypertension, a high birth weight baby, preeclampsia and emergency cesarean delivery in both nulliparous and parous normal weight women. Similar results were found for overweight women except for no increased risk for gestational hypertension in parous women with GWG?>?IOM rec. Seventy-four percent of the overweight nulliparous women and 66% of the obese women had a GWG?>?IOM rec. A GWG?>?IOM rec. resulted in increased risk of PPWR?>?2 kg in all weight classes, but most women attained their prepregnant weight class by 18 months post-partum.
For prepregnant normal weight and overweight women a GWG?>?IOM rec. increased the risk for unfavorable birth outcomes in both nulliparous and parous women. A GWG?>?IOM rec. increased the risk of a PPWR?>?2 kg at 18 months in all weight classes. This large study supports the Norwegian Health authorities' recommendations for normal weight and overweight women to comply with the IOM rec.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24917037 View in PubMed
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Breast-feeding in relation to weight retention up to 36 months postpartum in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study: modification by socio-economic status?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259545
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Jul;17(7):1514-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Martin Brandhagen
Lauren Lissner
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Anna-Pia Häggkvist
Margaretha Haugen
Anna Winkvist
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Jul;17(7):1514-23
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Breast Feeding
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Income
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Mothers
Norway
Obesity - prevention & control
Postpartum Period
Poverty
Pregnancy
Social Class
Weight Gain
Abstract
We investigated the association between full breast-feeding up to 6 months as well as partial breast-feeding after 6 months and maternal weight retention at 6, 18 and 36 months after delivery in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
Cohort study. Information on exposure and outcome was collected by questionnaire.
Norway.
Women at 6 months (n 49 676), 18 months (n 27 187) and 36 months (n 17 343) postpartum.
Longer duration of full breast-feeding as well as partial breast-feeding was significantly related to lower weight retention at 6 months. At 18 months full breast-feeding (0-6 months) and partial breast-feeding for 12-18 months were significantly related to lower weight retention. At 36 months only full breast-feeding (0-6 months) was significantly related to lower weight retention. For each additional month of full breast-feeding, maternal weight was lowered by 0·50 kg/month at 6 months, 0·10 kg/month at 18 months and 0·14 kg/month at 36 months (adjusted for pre-pregnant BMI, pregnancy weight gain, age and parity). Partial breast-feeding resulted in 0·25 kg/month lower maternal weight at 6 months. Interactions were found between household income and full breast-feeding in relation to weight retention at 6, 18 and 36 months, indicating most benefit among women with low income.
The present study supports the hypothesis that full breast-feeding contributes to lower postpartum weight retention and shows that the effect is maintained for as long as 3 years postpartum.
PubMed ID
23915637 View in PubMed
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Changes and tracking of fruit, vegetables and sugar-sweetened beverages intake from 18 months to 7 years in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265498
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:793
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Mona Bjelland
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Wenche Nystad
Lene Frost Andersen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:793
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Beverages
Child
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Norway - epidemiology
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Public Health
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
A few studies have investigated tracking of dietary patterns or nutrient intake in pre-school children, but no studies have been identified examining tracking of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), fruit and vegetable intakes in early childhood (1-7 year olds). The purpose of this study was to investigate changes and tracking of intakes of fruit, vegetables and SSB, and association between maternal education and dietary tracking, from 18 months to 7 years of age.
Longitudinal data from the nation-wide Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health were used, including 9025 children participating at three time points (18 months, 36 months and 7 years). Frequencies of fruit, vegetables and SSB were assessed by questionnaire. Slightly different questions were used at each time point to collect information about intake. Maternal education was categorized into =?12 years, 13-16 years, =?17 years. Cross-tabulation, Spearman's rho and multinomial logistic regression were used for assessing change, tracking and differences by maternal education.
Analyses by gender indicated largest changes for intake of fruit and SSB from age 18 months to 7 years. Fair to moderate tracking coefficients (Spearman's rho = 0.23-0.46) for intake of fruit, vegetables and SSB were found and children assigned to low, medium and high frequency of consumption at 18 months continued to be in the same group at age 36 months and 7 years. Children of mothers with low education consumed fruit and vegetables less often and SSB more often compared to children of mothers with high education at 18 months of age. Children with higher educated mothers had lower odds for increasing fruit intake or decreasing SSB intake, compared to children with lower educated mothers showing a stable intake.
The tracking coefficients for intakes were fair to moderate and differences in intakes according to maternal education were found already at age 18 months. This suggests that promotion of healthy dietary behaviours at an early age is important to prevent unfavourable dietary behaviours later in childhood. Moreover, it seems important to target mothers in nutrition interventions for improving dietary habits among children.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24103398 View in PubMed
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Determinants of plasma PCB, brominated flame retardants, and organochlorine pesticides in pregnant women and 3 year old children in The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273849
Source
Environ Res. 2016 Apr;146:136-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ida Henriette Caspersen
Helen Engelstad Kvalem
Margaretha Haugen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Cathrine Thomsen
May Frøshaug
Nanna Margrethe Bruun Bremnes
Sharon Lynn Broadwell
Berit Granum
Manolis Kogevinas
Helle Katrine Knutsen
Source
Environ Res. 2016 Apr;146:136-44
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Demography
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Flame Retardants - metabolism
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Brominated - blood
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Life Style
Norway
Pesticides - blood
Polybrominated Biphenyls - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Pregnancy
Abstract
Exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) during prenatal and postnatal life has been extensively studied in relation to adverse health effects in children.
The aim was to identify determinants of the concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ethers, PBDEs; polybrominated biphenyl, PBB), and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in blood samples from pregnant women and children in The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).
Blood samples were collected from two independent subsamples within MoBa; a group of women (n=96) enrolled in mid-pregnancy during the years 2002-2008 and a group of 3 year old children (n=99) participating during 2010-2011. PCB congeners (74, 99, 138, 153, 180, 170, 194, 209, 105, 114, 118, 156, 157, 167, and 189), brominated flame retardants (PBDE-28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154, and PBB-153), as well as the OCPs hexachlorobenzene (HCB), oxychlordane, 4,4'dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and 4,4'dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) were measured in both pregnant women and children.
Age, low parity, and low pre-pregnant BMI were the most important determinants of increased plasma concentrations of POPs in pregnant women. In 3 year old children, prolonged breastfeeding duration was a major determinant of increased POP concentrations. Estimated dietary exposure to PCBs during pregnancy was positively associated with plasma concentrations in 3 year old children, but not in pregnant women. Plasma concentrations were approximately 40% higher in children compared to pregnant women.
Several factors associated with exposure and toxicokinetics, i.e. accumulation, excretion and transfer via breastmilk of POPs were the main predictors of POP levels in pregnant women and children. Diet, which is the main exposure source for these compounds in the general population, was found to predict PCB levels only among children. For the PBDEs, for which non-dietary sources are more important, toxicokinetic factors appeared to have less predictive impact.
PubMed ID
26749444 View in PubMed
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Dietary acrylamide intake during pregnancy and fetal growth-results from the Norwegian mother and child cohort study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118477
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Mar;121(3):374-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Talita Duarte-Salles
Hans von Stedingk
Berit Granum
Kristine B Gützkow
Per Rydberg
Margareta Törnqvist
Michelle A Mendez
Gunnar Brunborg
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Margaretha Haugen
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Mar;121(3):374-9
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Cohort Studies
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Female
Fetal Development - drug effects
Hemoglobins - chemistry
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Abstract
Acrylamide has shown developmental and reproductive toxicity in animals, as well as neurotoxic effects in humans with occupational exposures. Because it is widespread in food and can pass through the human placenta, concerns have been raised about potential developmental effects of dietary exposures in humans.
We assessed associations of prenatal exposure to dietary acrylamide with small for gestational age (SGA) and birth weight.
This study included 50,651 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Acrylamide exposure assessment was based on intake estimates obtained from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), which were compared with hemoglobin (Hb) adduct measurements reflecting acrylamide exposure in a subset of samples (n = 79). Data on infant birth weight and gestational age were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Multivariable regression was used to estimate associations between prenatal acrylamide and birth outcomes.
Acrylamide intake during pregnancy was negatively associated with fetal growth. When women in the highest quartile of acrylamide intake were compared with women in the lowest quartile, the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for SGA was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.21) and the coefficient for birth weight was -25.7 g (95% CI: -35.9, -15.4). Results were similar after excluding mothers who smoked during pregnancy. Maternal acrylamide- and glycidamide-Hb adduct levels were correlated with estimated dietary acrylamide intakes (Spearman correlations = 0.24; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.44; and 0.48; 95% CI: 0.29, 0.63, respectively).
Lowering dietary acrylamide intake during pregnancy may improve fetal growth.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23204292 View in PubMed
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Dietary acrylamide intake during pregnancy and postnatal growth and obesity: Results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296662
Source
Environ Int. 2018 04; 113:325-334
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Manik Kadawathagedara
Jérémie Botton
Blandine de Lauzon-Guillain
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
Margaretha Haugen
Eleni Papadopoulou
Author Affiliation
INSERM, UMR1153 Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité Center (CRESS), Early determinants of the child's health and development Team (ORCHAD), Paris F-75014, France; Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. Electronic address: manik.kadawathagedara@inserm.fr.
Source
Environ Int. 2018 04; 113:325-334
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Adult
Child
Child Development - drug effects
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diet
Dietary Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Eating
Female
Food
Food Contamination
Humans
Logistic Models
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - chemically induced
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Abstract
Prenatal acrylamide exposure has been negatively associated with fetal growth but the association with child growth is unknown.
We studied the association between prenatal acrylamide exposure and child postnatal growth up to 8?years in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).
In 51,952 mother-child pairs from MoBa, acrylamide intake during pregnancy was estimated by combining maternal food intake with food concentrations of acrylamide. Mothers reported their child's weight and length/height up to 11 times between 6?weeks and 8?years. Weight and height growth trajectories were modelled using Jenss-Bayley's growth model. Logistic regression models were used to study the association with overweight/obese status at 3, 5 and 8?years, as identified using the International Obesity Task Force cut-offs. Linear mixed-effect models were used to explore associations with overall growth.
At 3?years, the adjusted odds ratios (95% Confidence Intervals (CI)) of being overweight/obese were 1.10 (1.02, 1.20), 1.12 (1.04, 1.22) and 1.21 (1.11, 1.31) by increasing prenatal acrylamide exposure quartile. Similar dose-response associations were found at 5 and 8?years. Acrylamide intake during pregnancy was associated with higher weight growth velocity in childhood. Children exposed at the highest level had 22?g (95% CI: 8, 37), 57?g (95% CI: 32, 81), and 194?g (95% CI: 110, 278) higher weight at 0.5, 2, and 8?years, respectively, compared to their low exposed peers.
Children prenatally exposed to acrylamide in the highest quartile experienced a moderate increase in weight growth velocity during early childhood that resulted in a moderately increased prevalence of overweight/obesity compared to peers in the lowest quartile. Our study is the first to link prenatal acrylamide exposure and postnatal growth.
PubMed ID
29398013 View in PubMed
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Dietary benzo(a)pyrene intake during pregnancy and birth weight: associations modified by vitamin C intakes in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107027
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:217-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Talita Duarte-Salles
Michelle A Mendez
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Margaretha Haugen
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: duartesallest@fellows.iarc.fr.
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:217-23
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ascorbic Acid - pharmacology
Benzo(a)pyrene - administration & dosage - analysis - toxicity
Birth Weight - drug effects
Child
Cohort Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fetal Development - drug effects
Food - classification
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Heredodegenerative Disorders, Nervous System - chemically induced
Humans
Infant
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Microphthalmos - chemically induced
Multivariate Analysis
Mutagenicity Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Parity
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Abstract
Maternal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) during pregnancy has been associated with reduced fetal growth. However, the role of diet, the main source of PAH exposure among non-smokers, remains uncertain.
To assess associations between maternal exposure to dietary intake of the genotoxic PAH benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] during pregnancy and birth weight, exploring potential effect modification by dietary intakes of vitamins C, E and A, hypothesized to influence PAH metabolism.
This study included 50,651 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Dietary B(a)P and nutrient intakes were estimated based on total consumption obtained from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and estimated based on food composition data. Data on infant birth weight were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN). Multivariate regression was used to assess associations between dietary B(a)P and birth weight, evaluating potential interactions with candidate nutrients.
The multivariate-adjusted coefficient (95%CI) for birth weight associated with maternal energy-adjusted B(a)P intake was -20.5g (-31.1, -10.0) in women in the third compared with the first tertile of B(a)P intake. Results were similar after excluding smokers. Significant interactions were found between elevated intakes of vitamin C (>85mg/day) and dietary B(a)P during pregnancy for birth weight (P
PubMed ID
24071023 View in PubMed
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Dietary exposure to dioxins and PCBs in a large cohort of pregnant women: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108262
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:398-407
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Ida H Caspersen
Helle K Knutsen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Helen E Kvalem
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. ida.henriette.caspersen@fhi.no
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:398-407
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Burden
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Dioxins - administration & dosage - blood
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - administration & dosage - analysis - blood
Female
Fish Products - adverse effects - analysis
Food Contamination
Humans
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - administration & dosage - blood
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Exposure to dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) during pregnancy and breastfeeding may result in adverse health effects in children. Prenatal exposure is determined by the concentrations of dioxins and PCBs in maternal blood, which reflect the body burden obtained by long term dietary exposure. The aims of this study were (1) to describe dietary exposure and important dietary sources to dioxins and PCBs in a large group of pregnant women and (2) to identify maternal characteristics associated with high dietary exposure to dioxins and PCBs. Dietary exposure to dioxins (sum of toxic equivalents (TEQs) from dioxin-like (dl) compounds) and PCB-153 in 83,524 pregnant women (gestational weeks 17-22) who participated in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) during the years 2002-2009 was calculated based on a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and a database of dioxin and PCB concentrations in Norwegian food. The median (interquartile range, IQR) intake of PCB-153 (marker of ndl-PCBs) was 0.81 (0.77) ng/kg bw/day. For dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs, the median (IQR) intake was 0.56 (0.37) pg TEQ/kg bw/day. Moreover, 2.3% of the participants had intakes exceeding the tolerable weekly intake (TWI) of 14pg TEQ/kg bw/week. Multiple regression analysis showed that dietary exposure was positively associated with maternal age, maternal education, weight gain during pregnancy, being a student, and alcohol consumption during pregnancy and negatively associated with pre-pregnancy BMI and smoking. A high dietary exposure to PCB-153 or dl-compounds (TEQ) was mainly explained by the consumption of seagull eggs and/or pate with fish liver and roe. Women who according to Norwegian recommendations avoid these food items generally do not have dietary exposure above the tolerable intake of dioxins and dl-PCBs.
PubMed ID
23911340 View in PubMed
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