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Acyl pattern of adipose tissue triglycerides, plasma free fatty acids, and diet of a group of men participating in a primary coronary prevention program (the Oslo Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55772
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1983 Dec;38(6):906-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983
Author
B K Jacobsen
K. Trygg
I. Hjermann
M S Thomassen
C. Real
K R Norum
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1983 Dec;38(6):906-13
Date
Dec-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - analysis
Adult
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Dietary Fats - therapeutic use
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - analysis
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Triglycerides - analysis
Abstract
The acyl pattern of adipose tissue triglycerides and of plasma free fatty acids were determined after 7 yr of diet intervention on elevated plasma cholesterol in 42 men taking part in the smoking-lipid trial of the Oslo Study. Twenty-two of the men were advised to change dietary habits (mainly reduce saturated fat) whereas the remaining 20 were controls. The adipose tissue from men in the intervention group contained relatively more linoleic and linolenic acids and relatively less saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids compared to men in the control group. There were strong correlations between the relative content of several fatty acids in adipose tissue triglycerides and plasma free fatty acid. Furthermore, there was a close correlation between the intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids found in a dietary survey done 2 to 3 yr before this study and the relative content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in adipose tissue.
PubMed ID
6650449 View in PubMed
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Age and sex differences in the distribution and ultrasound morphology of carotid atherosclerosis: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54157
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1999 Dec;19(12):3007-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
O. Joakimsen
K H Bonaa
E. Stensland-Bugge
B K Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. oddmund.joakimsen@ism.uit.no
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1999 Dec;19(12):3007-13
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arteriosclerosis - pathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Arteries - pathology - ultrasonography
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Atherosclerosis begins early in life and is the major underlying cause of cardiovascular morbidity and death. Yet, population-based information on age and sex differences in the extent and morphology of atherosclerosis throughout life is scarce. Carotid atherosclerosis can be visualized with B-mode ultrasound and is a marker of atherosclerosis elsewhere in the circulation. We assessed both the prevalence and the morphology of carotid atherosclerosis by B-mode ultrasound in 3016 men and 3404 women, 25 to 84 years old, who participated in a population health survey. The participation rate was 88%. Plaque morphology was graded according to whether a plaque was predominantly soft (echolucent) or hard (echogenic). Atherosclerotic plaques were found in 55.4% of the men and 45.8% of the women. In men, there was a linear increase with age in the prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis, whereas in women, there was a curvilinear age trend, with an inflection in the prevalence rate of women at approximately 50 years of age. The male predominance in atherosclerosis declined after the age of 50 years, the plaque prevalence being similar in elderly men and women. Men had softer plaques than women; this sex difference in plaque morphology increased significantly (P=0.005) with age. The sex difference in the prevalence of atherosclerosis and the female age trend in atherosclerosis show significant changes at the age of approximately 50 years, suggesting an adverse effect of menopause on atherosclerosis. The higher proportion of soft plaques in men compared with women increases with age and may partly account for the prevailing male excess risk of coronary heart disease in the elderly despite a similar prevalence of atherosclerosis in elderly men and women.
PubMed ID
10591682 View in PubMed
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[A review of Norwegian studies--how much do we exercise during our leisure time?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32369
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Nov 20;120(28):3439-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-2000
Author
A J Søgaard
K. Bø
M. Klungland
B K Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Senter for forebyggende medisin Ullevål sykehus 0407 Oslo. a.j.sogaard@samfunnsmed.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Nov 20;120(28):3439-46
Date
Nov-20-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Comparative Study
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Exercise
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Low levels of physical activity is associated with major health problems. However, no overview of the level of physical activity outside work or school in Norway has been made, which is important in order to implement targeted interventions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Based on published as well as unpublished data, we present data on physical activity in Norway--among children and adolescents, adults and elderly people. RESULTS: Results from different studies differ markedly. However, the main findings are these: The level of physical activity increases in childhood up until about 13 years of age. Approximately 70% of adolescents are active two hours or more a week beyond school-hours. The proportion of physical active youngsters then decreases towards young adulthood. Adults and elderly people get more inactive with increasing age. Data on physical activity from the past 10-15 years suggest a slight increase in the proportion of moderately active Norwegians. INTERPRETATION: Research on physical activity is impeded by the fact that different studies have operationalized physical activity differently and used different age grouping. There is a need for surveys in representative samples with standardised and validated questions, with uniform age classification, covering the full spectre of physical activity. In addition, we need smaller studies with more comprehensive measures of physical activity in Norway.
PubMed ID
11187202 View in PubMed
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The association between mental distress and the use of alternative medicine among cancer patients in North Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18209
Source
Qual Life Res. 2003 Aug;12(5):539-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
T. Risberg
B K Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
University Hospital of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. terje.risberg@unn.no
Source
Qual Life Res. 2003 Aug;12(5):539-44
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Complementary Therapies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
PURPOSE OF THE STUDY: To study the association between mental distress and the use of alternative medicine (AM) among cancer patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A longitudinal questionnaire-based study was carried out at the Department of Oncology, University Hospital of Tromsø, Norway, during the period 1990-1991. The level of mental distress in 158 patients aged less than 75 years was assessed 4 months after first admission to the cancer ward. The patients answered five questions about mental distress selected from the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). The questions were scored continuously according to the Likert scoring procedure. The level of mental distress was also ranked from 1 (little or no mental distress) to 3 (high mental distress). RESULTS: A total of 53 of the 158 patients reported use of AM at inclusion of the study or during the 4 months of follow-up. Among patients with low mental distress, 21% were users of AM, 36% of patients with medium distress and 48% in patients with high level of mental distress (p-value for linear trend = 0.02). Adjusted for all known relevant variables, patients with medium level of mental distress had 1.9 times higher prevalence of use of AM than patients with low level of mental distress, patients with high mental distress had a 2.9 times higher prevalence (p = 0.15 and 0.07, respectively). Analyzed as a continuous variable (Likert score between 5 and 20), mental distress was associated with use of AM (p = 0.007). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that seeking alternative treatment is more common among mentally distressed cancer patients.
PubMed ID
13677498 View in PubMed
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Associations between symptoms of irritable colon and psychological and social conditions and lifestyle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46735
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1986 Jun 21;292(6536):1633-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-21-1986
Author
R. Johnsen
B K Jacobsen
O H Førde
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1986 Jun 21;292(6536):1633-5
Date
Jun-21-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Colonic Diseases, Functional - epidemiology - psychology
Diet
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Social Conditions
Statistics
Abstract
In a survey of risk factors for coronary heart disease 14 102 middle aged men and women answered a questionnaire on lifestyle, diet, and health, including symptoms of functional abdominal disorders. The overall prevalence of reports of one or both of the abdominal symptoms of "bloating and rumbling" or "cramping abdominal pain" was 28% in men and 35% in women. Only a weak negative association between age and prevalence of reported pain was found in both sexes. Women reported abdominal symptoms, especially cramping abdominal pain, significantly more commonly than men. In a multiple regression analysis abdominal symptoms were much more strongly associated with symptoms of mental stress such as depression, sleeping difficulties, problems of coping, and the use of analgesics than with lifestyle, dietary, and social variables together. The association was stronger in subjects reporting both symptoms. This strong and consistent association between functional abdominal disorders and psychological and social problems suggests that action other than prescribing drugs, diets, or radiography is required.
PubMed ID
3087551 View in PubMed
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Bone mineral density in acute stroke patients: low bone mineral density may predict first stroke in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67447
Source
Stroke. 2001 Jan;32(1):47-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
L. Jørgensen
T. Engstad
B K Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. Lone.Jorgensen@hitos.no
Source
Stroke. 2001 Jan;32(1):47-51
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bone Density
Cerebrovascular Accident - prevention & control - radiography
Densitometry, X-Ray
Female
Femur Neck - radiography
Humans
Male
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Osteoporosis and stroke share several risk factors, including age, smoking, low physical activity, and hypertension. Thus, low bone mineral density (BMD) and high stroke risk may be related. We examined the relationship between BMD and acute stroke in noninstitutionalized men and women aged >/=60 years. METHODS: Sixty-three stroke patients (33 women and 30 men) and 188 control subjects from the general population were included. BMD was measured by using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry at both proximal femurs. The measurements of the stroke patients were performed 6 days after the onset of stroke. RESULTS: The BMD at the femoral neck in the female stroke patients was 8% lower than in the control subjects (P:=0.007). In men, no difference in BMD between the stroke patients and their controls was found. Women with BMD values in the lowest quartile had a higher risk of stroke than women with BMD values in the highest quartile (OR 4.8), and the probability value for linear trend over the quartiles was statistically significant (P:=0.003). The OR for stroke increased 1.9 per SD (0.13 g/cm(2)) reduction in BMD, and the association between low BMD and stroke in women remained significant when the analysis was adjusted for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: Female, but not male, stroke patients have lower BMD than population controls. Low BMD may predict stroke in women.
Notes
Comment In: Stroke. 2001 Dec 1;32(12):2956-711740005
PubMed ID
11136913 View in PubMed
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Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1988 Jan 23;296(6617):291
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-23-1988
Author
B K Jacobsen
V. Hansen
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1988 Jan 23;296(6617):291
Date
Jan-23-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coffee - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - etiology
Norway
PubMed ID
3124918 View in PubMed
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Carotid atherosclerosis and relation to growth of infrarenal aortic diameter and follow-up diameter: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117810
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2013 Feb;45(2):135-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
S H Johnsen
S H Forsdahl
S. Solberg
K. Singh
B K Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology and Neurophysiology, University Hospital North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. sh_johnsen@live.no
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2013 Feb;45(2):135-40
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aorta, Abdominal - pathology - ultrasonography
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Dilatation, Pathologic
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Abstract
This research aims to study how carotid atherosclerosis is related to growth of infrarenal aortic diameter and aneurysmal formation.
Population-based follow-up study.
At baseline, ultrasound examination of the carotid artery and the abdominal aorta was performed in 4241 persons from a general population with no evidence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The burden of atherosclerosis was assessed as carotid total plaque area (TPA). After a mean follow-up of 6.3 years, a new ultrasound examination was performed and measurements of the aortic diameter and carotid TPA were repeated. The effects on aortic diameter progression, follow-up diameter and risk for AAA were assessed in multiple linear and logistic regression models according to carotid TPA, adjusted for known risk factors.
When analysing AAA as a dichotomous variable, a borderline association between atherosclerosis and AAA could be demonstrated. When modelling aortic diameter as a continuous variable, a 1-SD increase in 5 years' carotid plaque area (?TPA) was associated with a 0.12-mm growth in infrarenal aortic diameter (standard error (SE) 0.04) and a 0.20-mm wider aorta at follow-up (SE 0.06). No independent relation was seen for baseline atherosclerosis.
Carotid plaque progression was positively related to growth in infrarenal aortic diameter and aortic diameter at follow-up. Whether this co-variation between plaque growth and aortic diameter growth is causally related or independent events is still an open question.
PubMed ID
23267698 View in PubMed
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Cause-specific mortality in psychiatric patients after deinstitutionalisation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19479
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2001 Nov;179:438-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
V. Hansen
B K Jacobsen
E. Arnesen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. vidje.hansen@ism.uit.no
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2001 Nov;179:438-43
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Cause of Death
Deinstitutionalization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Since the late 1970s, the psychiatric service system in Norway has been changed gradually according to the principles of deinstitutionalisation. AIMS: To document the mortality of psychiatric patients in a deinstitutionalised service system. METHODS: The case register of a psychiatric hospital covering the period 1980-1992 was linked to the Central Register of Deaths. Age-adjusted death rates and standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed. RESULTS: Patients with organic psychiatric disorders had significantly higher mortality regardless of cause of death. SMRs ranged from 0.9 for death by cancer in women to 36.3 for suicide in men. For unnatural death, SMRs were highest in the first year after discharge. Compared to the periods 1950-1962 and 1963-1974, there has been an increase in SMRs for cardiovascular death and suicide in both genders. CONCLUSIONS: Deinstitutionalisation seems to have had as its cost a relative rise both in cardiovascular death and unnatural deaths for both genders, but most pronounced in men.
PubMed ID
11689402 View in PubMed
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Cervical neoplasia in pap smears: risk of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN) after negative or no prior smears in a population without a mass screening programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22774
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Feb;25(1):53-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
S. Forsmo
B K Jacobsen
H. Stalsberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Feb;25(1):53-8
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine, in a population not submitted to mass screening, the risk of cancer and cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN) in Pap smears from women without previously reported positive smears. METHODS: In a logistic regression model consisting of 58,271 smears from 40,536 Norwegian women the risk of cytologically indicated CIN was studied according to age and time elapsed since last smear. RESULTS: The risk of CIN was highest in smears from women with no previously registered smears and in smears taken after an interval of > or = 5 years. Odds ratio for CIN I-II adjusted for age was highest in first time smears and in smears taken after an interval of 5 years. Odds ratio for CIN III was highest in first registered smears. No difference in risk of CIN III was found in smears taken within one year or 2-3 years after the last smear. The increased risk of CIN III in first smears was most pronounced in postmenopausal women ( > 50 years). Nine of 16 cases with cytological indication of cancer were found in women having a smear taken for the first time. All cases with malignancy in smears were > 50 years. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of cytologically diagnosed premalignant cervical conditions increases with time since the previous smear, but more than 5 years have to elapse before the risk is comparable with that in first smears taken. Postmenopausal women without previous smears run the highest risk of serious cervical premalignancies and cancer.
PubMed ID
8666505 View in PubMed
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52 records – page 1 of 6.