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Source
Aust N Z J Public Health. 1996 Aug;20(4):441
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
J F Thompson
Source
Aust N Z J Public Health. 1996 Aug;20(4):441
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Health Personnel
Health promotion
Humans
Northwest Territories
Notes
Comment On: Aust N Z J Public Health. 1996 Jun;20(3):227-98768407
PubMed ID
8908775 View in PubMed
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Accounting for system dynamics in reserve design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87620
Source
Ecol Appl. 2007 Oct;17(7):1954-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Leroux Shawn J
Schmiegelow Fiona K A
Cumming Steve G
Lessard Robert B
Nagy John
Author Affiliation
Canadian BEACONs project, Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, 751 General Services Building, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H1, Canada. shawn.leroux@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Ecol Appl. 2007 Oct;17(7):1954-66
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Computer simulation
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecosystem
Female
Fires
Models, Theoretical
Northwest Territories
Plants
Reindeer
Abstract
Systematic conservation plans have only recently considered the dynamic nature of ecosystems. Methods have been developed to incorporate climate change, population dynamics, and uncertainty in reserve design, but few studies have examined how to account for natural disturbance. Considering natural disturbance in reserve design may be especially important for the world's remaining intact areas, which still experience active natural disturbance regimes. We developed a spatially explicit, dynamic simulation model, CONSERV, which simulates patch dynamics and fire, and used it to evaluate the efficacy of hypothetical reserve networks in northern Canada. We designed six networks based on conventional reserve design methods, with different conservation targets for woodland caribou habitat, high-quality wetlands, vegetation, water bodies, and relative connectedness. We input the six reserve networks into CONSERV and tracked the ability of each to maintain initial conservation targets through time under an active natural disturbance regime. None of the reserve networks maintained all initial targets, and some over-represented certain features, suggesting that both effectiveness and efficiency of reserve design could be improved through use of spatially explicit dynamic simulation during the planning process. Spatial simulation models of landscape dynamics are commonly used in natural resource management, but we provide the first illustration of their potential use for reserve design. Spatial simulation models could be used iteratively to evaluate competing reserve designs and select targets that have a higher likelihood of being maintained through time. Such models could be combined with dynamic planning techniques to develop a general theory for reserve design in an uncertain world.
PubMed ID
17974334 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and loss of fitness in the Inuit: the preventive role of active leisure

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5318
Source
Pages 213-217 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
30-39 years in the men and 20..29 years in the 3. Szathmary E, Holt N. Hyperglycemia in Dogn iatioll women who took part in any form of deliberate ans of the Northwest Territories, Canada. ~ fat. exercise or active leisure. Nevertheless, those people with age and a centripetal distribution of Y
  1 document  
Author
Rode, A
Shephard, R.J
Author Affiliation
School of Physical & Health Education, University of Toronto
Source
Pages 213-217 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Body Composition
Exercise
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Northwest Territories
Physical Fitness
Abstract
The association between active leisure pursuits and various indices of fitness has been examined in 165 males aged 13-39 years and 95 females aged 13-29 years, all Inuit residents of the community of Igloolik, NWT (69 degrees 40'N). The active individuals have largely conserved the high level of fitness that characterized the settlement in 1969/70, showing substantial advantages over their sedentary peers in terms of relative aerobic power (27.7%, males, 21.3%, females) and subcutaneous fat (18.3%, males, 5.9%, females), with a lesser trend to advantages of strength (handgrip force, 4.4%, males, 0.8% females; knee extension force, 8.3%, males, 2.0%, females). Much of their continued aerobic fitness can probably be attributed to physical activity although in the boys aged 13-16 years, a further factor is the selection of active leisure pursuits by tall, heavy and early maturing individuals. Both the lower body fat and the larger aerobic power are likely to have positive implications for future health. The current challenge is thus to increase the proportion of physically active villagers beyond the current 18.8% of males and 11.6% of females.
PubMed ID
8397578 View in PubMed
Documents
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Acculturation and loss of fitness in the Inuit: the preventive role of active leisure

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102154
Source
Arctic Medical Research. 1993;Jul 52(3):107-112
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993
Author
Rode, A
Shephard, R.J
Author Affiliation
School of Physical & Health Education, University of Toronto
Source
Arctic Medical Research. 1993;Jul 52(3):107-112
Date
Jul-1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Body Composition
Exercise
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Northwest Territories
Physical Fitness
Abstract
The association between active leisure pursuits and various indices of fitness has been examined in 165 males aged 13-39 years and 95 females aged 13-29 years, all Inuit residents of the community of Igloolik, NWT (69 degrees 40'N). The active individuals have largely conserved the high level of fitness that characterized the settlement in 1969/70, showing substantial advantages over their sedentary peers in terms of relative aerobic power (27.7%, males, 21.3%, females) and subcutaneous fat (18.3%, males, 5.9%, females), with a lesser trend to advantages of strength (handgrip force, 4.4%, males, 0.8% females; knee extension force, 8.3%, males, 2.0%, females). Much of their continued aerobic fitness can probably be attributed to physical activity although in the boys aged 13-16 years, a further factor is the selection of active leisure pursuits by tall, heavy and early maturing individuals. Both the lower body fat and the larger aerobic power are likely to have positive implications for future health. The current challenge is thus to increase the proportion of physically active villagers beyond the current 18.8% of males and 11.6% of females.
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Addressing arsenic bioaccessibility in ecological risk assessment: a novel approach to avoid overestimating risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91571
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2009 Mar;28(3):668-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Ollson Christopher A
Koch Iris
Smith Paula
Knopper Loren D
Hough Chris
Reimer Ken J
Author Affiliation
Jacques Whitford, Burlington, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2009 Mar;28(3):668-75
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arsenic - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Biological Availability
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Industrial Waste
Mining
Northwest Territories
Peromyscus
Risk assessment
Soil Pollutants - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Trees
Abstract
The risk of arsenic exposure to deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) living in areas of naturally and anthropogenically elevated arsenic levels was determined using three separate calculations of arsenic daily intake: Estimated daily intake (EDI), bioaccessible EDI (BEDI), and actual daily intake (ADI). The present work is of particular interest, because the risk assessments were determined for animals naturally exposed to arsenic. Gastric fluid extraction was used to obtain bioaccessibility data for soil and plant samples collected from three study sites (background, mine forest, and tailings) in Yellowknife (NT, Canada). Calculations using the EDI indicated that deer mice living in tailings habitat (average soil arsenic concentration, 1,740 +/- 2,240 microg/g) should have been experiencing serious health effects as a result of their exposure to arsenic. Using BEDI and ADI in the risk assessment calculation, however, resulted in an order-of-magnitude decrease in calculated risk. In addition, results calculated using the BEDI and ADI were not significantly different, suggesting that using bioaccessibility provides a more realistic estimate of potential risk. The present results provide evidence that the use of EDI in traditional risk assessments may seriously overestimate the actual risk, which in some instances may result in expensive and unnecessary clean-up measures.
PubMed ID
18939889 View in PubMed
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Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1993 Feb;59(2):117-8, 122-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
E. Rea
G. Thompson
M E Moffatt
T K Young
J. O'Neil
A. Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1993 Feb;59(2):117-8, 122-5
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology
Dental Health Services - organization & administration
Dental Health Surveys
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology - ethnology
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In 1990, as part of a major health status assessment, a dental survey was carried out on a 20 per cent random sample of the adult population in the Keewatin region of the Northwest Territories. A 73 per cent response rate was obtained. Of the 397 people examined, 334 (88 per cent) identified themselves as Inuit. More than 20 per cent of the respondents were edentulous, including 10 per cent of those 18 to 34 years old. The median DMFT was 24 for all respondents and 21 for dentulous respondents. There was a significant difference between Inuit and non-Inuit respondents, which was most marked in the 18 to 34 year old age group (mean DMFT 22.1 versus 15.6, p
PubMed ID
8453514 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological perspective of injuries in the Northwest Territories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3674
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1992;51 Suppl 7:27-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
T K Young
M E Moffatt
J D O'Neill
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1992;51 Suppl 7:27-36
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Wounds and Injuries - ethnology - mortality
Abstract
This paper reviews the epidemiology of injuries in the multiethnic population of the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada, based on mortality, hospital morbidity, and health survey data. Overall, injury mortality in the NWT has remained consistently higher than the Canadian national rate. In the NWT, an increasing trend was observed for motor vehicle accidents and homicide in both sexes, and suicide among males, while other accidents (including fires and drowning) have declined substantially among males. The age group which reported the highest suicide rate was shifted downward between the periods 1961-70 and 1981-86. Of the three major groups in the NWT, the overall injury mortality rate was comparable between Indians and Inuit, and their rates were twice as high as that of non-Natives. The age-standardized hospitalization rate for all injuries for the Keewatin Region was similar to that of Canada as a whole whereas the rate for the entire NWT was about twice as high. In the NWT, age-specific hospitalization rate was highest in both sexes among the elderly (age 65+), followed by those in age group 15-24. A survey of a random sample of Keewatin Region residents indicated a low usage rate for seatbelts and helmets while a significant minority of drivers (18%) admitted to drinking and driving sometimes. Such data contribute to a more comprehensive assessment of the burden of injury mortality and morbidity, an important prerequisite for the investigation of risk factors and design of intervention programs.
PubMed ID
1296667 View in PubMed
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An estimation of cosmic ray background exposure in Northern Territories

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96087
Source
Page 280 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
geographic locations and during different solar activity periods, the annual effective dose could vary from 0.27 to 0.84 mSv. In the three territories of northern Canada, the population weighted average annual effective doses due to cosmic ray exposure are 0.29 mSv for Nunavut, 0.31 mSv for Northwest
  1 document  
Author
Chen, J.
Timmins, R.
Verdecchia, K.
Sato, T.
Author Affiliation
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada
Japan Atomic Energy Agency
Source
Page 280 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cosmic rays
Natural radiation sources
Northwest Territories
Nunavut
PARMA simulation software
Solar activities
Yukon
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 7. Human Biology.
Documents
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An examination of the social determinants of health as factors related to health, healing and prevention of foetal alcohol spectrum disorder in a northern context--the Brightening Our Home Fires Project, Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107711
Source
Pages 169-174 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):169-174
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH An examination of the social determinants of health as factors related to health, healing and prevention of foetal alcohol spectrum disorder in a northern context - the brightening our home fires project, Northwest Territories, Canada Dorothy Badry 1 •2* and Aileen Wight
  1 document  
Author
Dorothy Badry
Aileen Wight Felske
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. badry@ucalgary.ca
Source
Pages 169-174 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):169-174
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - prevention & control
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Female
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - prevention & control - therapy
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Maternal Health Services - methods - organization & administration
Northwest Territories
Pregnancy
Social Determinants of Health
Abstract
The Brightening Our Home Fires (BOHF) project was conceptualized as an exploratory project to examine the issue of the prevention of foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) from a women's health perspective in the Northwest Territories (NT). While dominant discourse suggests that FASD is preventable by abstention from alcohol during pregnancy, a broader perspective would indicate that alcohol and pregnancy is a far more complex issue, that is, bound in location, economics, social and cultural views of health. This project was prevention focused and a social determinant of health (SDH) perspective informed this research.
The BOHF project was a qualitative research project using a participatory action research framework to examine women's health and healing in the north. The methodology utilized was Photovoice. Women were provided training in digital photography and given cameras to use and keep. The primary research question utilized was: What does health and healing look like for you in your community? Women described their photos, individually or in groups around this central topic. This research was FASD informed, and women participants were aware this was an FASD prevention funded project whose approach focused on a broader context of health and lived experience.
This project drew 30 participants from: Yellowknife, Lutsel 'ke, Behchokö and Ulukhaktok. These four different communities across the NT represented Dene and Inuit culture. The qualitative data analysis offered themes of importance to women's health in the north including: land and tradition; housing; poverty; food; family; health, mental health and trauma, and travel. Photovoice provides a non-threatening way to engage in dialogue on complex health and social issues.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Sep;70(4):428-3321878184
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1959 Nov 15;81:837-4113852329
PubMed ID
23984290 View in PubMed
Documents
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276 records – page 1 of 28.