Skip header and navigation

Refine By

63 records – page 1 of 7.

Acute myeloid leukemia following Hodgkin lymphoma: a population-based study of 35,511 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16487
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Feb 1;98(3):215-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2006
Author
Sara J Schonfeld
Ethel S Gilbert
Graça M Dores
Charles F Lynch
David C Hodgson
Per Hall
Hans Storm
Aage Andersen
Eero Pukkala
Eric Holowaty
Magnus Kaijser
Michael Andersson
Heikki Joensuu
Sophie D Fosså
James M Allan
Lois B Travis
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892-7238, USA.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Feb 1;98(3):215-8
Date
Feb-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hodgkin Disease - drug therapy - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Second Primary - chemically induced - epidemiology
North America - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Research Design
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Risk assessment
SEER Program
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
Treatments for Hodgkin lymphoma are associated with large relative risks of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but there are few estimates of the excess absolute risk (EAR), a useful measure of disease burden. One-year Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (N = 35,511) were identified within 14 population-based cancer registries in Nordic countries and North America from January 1, 1970, through December 31, 2001. We used Poisson regression analysis to model the EAR of AML, per 10,000 person-years. A total of 217 Hodgkin lymphoma survivors were diagnosed with AML (10.8 expected; unadjusted EAR = 6.2; 95% confidence interval = 5.4 to 7.1). Excess absolute risk for AML was highest during the first 10 years after Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis but remained elevated thereafter. In subsequent analyses, adjusted for time since Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis and presented for the 5-9 year interval, the EAR was statistically significantly (P or = 35 age groups, respectively), which may be associated with modifications in chemotherapy.
PubMed ID
16449681 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol use trajectories and problem drinking over the course of adolescence: a study of north american indigenous youth and their caretakers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134622
Source
J Health Soc Behav. 2011 Jun;52(2):228-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Jacob E Cheadle
Les B Whitbeck
Author Affiliation
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USA. j.e.cheade@gmail.com
Source
J Health Soc Behav. 2011 Jun;52(2):228-45
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
North America - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Risk assessment
Social Support
Stress, Psychological
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated the links between alcohol use trajectories and problem drinking (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition abuse/dependence) using five waves of data from 727 North American Indigenous adolescents between 10 and 17 years from eight reservations sharing a common language and culture. Growth mixture models linking fundamental causes, social stressors, support, and psychosocial pathways to problem drinking via alcohol use trajectories over the early life course were estimated. Results indicated that 20 percent of the adolescents began drinking at 11 to 12 years of age and that another 20 percent began drinking shortly thereafter. These early drinkers were at greatly elevated risk for problem drinking, as were those who began drinking at age 13. The etiological analysis revealed that stressors (e.g., perceived discrimination) directly and indirectly influenced early and problem alcohol use by decreasing positive school attitudes while increasing feelings of anger and perceived delinquent friendships. Girls were found to be at risk independently of these other factors.
Notes
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2000 May;157(5):745-5010784467
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Jan;40(1):83-9011195569
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2001 Mar;62(2):199-21011327186
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2001 Jun;42(2):151-6511467250
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Aug;25(8):1156-6511505047
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2001;10(2):67-8411698984
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 2002 Feb;70(1):67-7811860058
Cites: Public Health Rep. 2002;117 Suppl 1:S104-1712435834
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2002 Dec;43(4):400-1812664673
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1981 Dec;22(4):337-567320473
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1989 Sep;30(3):241-562674272
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1991 Mar;81(3):372-71994746
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1991 Dec;32(4):321-411765624
Cites: Child Dev. 1992 Jun;63(3):542-571600821
Cites: Br J Addict. 1992 Aug;87(8):1199-2041511233
Cites: Adolescence. 1993 Summer;28(110):253-668317274
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1994 Sep;35(3):193-2127983334
Cites: J Drug Educ. 1994;24(3):253-687844697
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1995;Spec No:53-797560850
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1995;Spec No:80-947560851
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 1998 May;33(6):1315-369603273
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1999 Sep;40(3):208-3010513145
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Jan;62(1):99-10815630077
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2006 Apr;62(7):1650-7116198467
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;41(8):632-4016779502
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2006 Sep;39(3):427-3416919807
Cites: Addiction. 2007 Feb;102(2):216-2517222275
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 Nov;65(9):1867-8117614176
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2007 Sep;48(3):267-8217982868
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2008 Aug;47(8):890-90018596558
Cites: AJS. 2008;114 Suppl:S171-20119569404
Cites: Demography. 2010 Feb;47(1):205-2520355691
PubMed ID
21558489 View in PubMed
Less detail

Back to front? Examining research priorities in rheumatology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224267
Source
Br J Rheumatol. 1992 Mar;31(3):193-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
G H Williams
A S Rigby
A C Papageorgiou
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Studies, University College Salford.
Source
Br J Rheumatol. 1992 Mar;31(3):193-6
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Back Pain - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Health Priorities
Humans
MEDLINE
North America - epidemiology
Research Design
Rheumatology - methods
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
Arthrosis and back troubles together account for at least a third of all rheumatic suffering, and they are much the commonest rheumatological causes of impairment and disability. In contrast to the inflammatory arthropathies, one cannot help but be struck by the fact that research endeavour has not been commensurate with the burden that has to be endured.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Rheumatol. 1992 Aug;31(8):505-61643448
PubMed ID
1531777 View in PubMed
Less detail

BDNF tagging polymorphisms and haplotype analysis in sporadic Parkinson's disease in diverse ethnic groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165588
Source
Neurosci Lett. 2007 Mar 19;415(1):59-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-19-2007
Author
G. Xiromerisiou
G M Hadjigeorgiou
J. Eerola
H H Fernandez
V. Tsimourtou
R. Mandel
O. Hellström
K. Gwinn-Hardy
M S Okun
P J Tienari
A B Singleton
Author Affiliation
Neurogenetics Unit, Department of Neurology, University of Thessaly, Medical School, Papakyriazi 22 Street, Larissa 41222, Greece, and Helsinki University Centeral Hospital, Finland.
Source
Neurosci Lett. 2007 Mar 19;415(1):59-63
Date
Mar-19-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Brain - metabolism - physiopathology
Brain Chemistry - genetics
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor - genetics
Cohort Studies
DNA Mutational Analysis
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gene Frequency
Genetic Markers - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genetic Testing
Genetic Variation - genetics
Genotype
Greece - epidemiology
Haplotypes - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
North America - epidemiology
Parkinson Disease - ethnology - genetics - metabolism
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Abstract
Experimental and clinical data suggest that genetic variations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene may affect risk for Parkinson's disease (PD). We performed a case-control association analysis of BDNF in three independent Caucasian cohorts (Greek, North American, and Finnish) of PD using eight tagging SNPs and five constructed haplotypes. No statistically significant differences in genotype and allele frequencies were found between cases and controls in all series. A relatively rare BDNF haplotype showed a trend towards association in the Greek (p=0.02) and the Finnish (p=0.03) series (this haplotype was not detected in the North American series). However, given the large number of comparisons these associations are considered non-significant. In conclusion, our results do not provide statistically significant evidence that common genetic variability in BDNF would associate with the risk for PD in the Caucasian populations studied here.
PubMed ID
17229524 View in PubMed
Less detail

A bioarcheological study of maxillary sinusitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78106
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2007 Jun;133(2):792-807
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Roberts Charlotte A
Author Affiliation
Department of Archaeology, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE, UK. c.a.roberts@durham.ac.uk
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2007 Jun;133(2):792-807
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - history
Egypt - epidemiology
England - epidemiology
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, Medieval
Humans
Maxillary Sinus - anatomy & histology - pathology
Maxillary Sinusitis - epidemiology - history - pathology
North America - epidemiology
Paleopathology
Prevalence
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
Maxillary sinusitis was studied as an indicator of poor air quality. Seven skeletal samples were examined from North America, England, and Nubia, and selected to represent different geographic locations, environments, and subsistence economies. Frequency rates varied from 17.2 to 51.5% of individuals affected with one or both sinuses preserved. Hardin Village had the highest frequency (51.5%), followed by the Aleuts (42.9%), "Illinois" (38.6%), Indian Knoll (38.5%), Kulubnarti (21.8%), Christchurch, Spitalfields (18.0%), and "South Dakota" (17.2%). Male frequencies ranged from 16.7 to 36.7%, but the female frequency ranged more widely from 18.0 to 76.5%. At most sites female rates exceeded male. The effect of urban and rural environment on sinusitis occurrence, and also subsistence economy, biological sex, and social status were explored, and comparative sites also considered; urban agricultural sites had a mean frequency of 48.5%, rural agricultural sites had a mean frequency of 45.0%, and hunter-gatherer sites had a mean frequency of 40.0%. In the urban sites male and female frequencies were near equal, but in the rural agricultural and hunter-gatherer sites female frequencies exceeded male frequencies. Dental disease was not found to have much impact on sinusitis frequency. The importance of the link between poor air quality and respiratory health is highlighted in clinical studies in both developed and developing countries, but also in bioarcheological studies.
PubMed ID
17427926 View in PubMed
Less detail

Botulism in the North: a disease without borders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137346
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Mar 1;52(5):593-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2011
Author
John W Austin
Daniel Leclair
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Mar 1;52(5):593-4
Date
Mar-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Botulism - epidemiology
Endemic Diseases
Humans
Incidence
North America - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Mar 1;52(5):585-9221292663
PubMed ID
21292664 View in PubMed
Less detail

Burden of disease, health indicators and challenges for epidemiology in North America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126251
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Apr;41(2):540-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Amy Toporowski
Sam Harper
Rebecca Fuhrer
Patricia A Buffler
Roger Detels
Nancy Krieger
Eduardo L Franco
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Apr;41(2):540-56
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Capacity building
Female
Health Priorities
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status Indicators
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Male
Morbidity - trends
Mortality - trends
North America - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Commissioned by the International Epidemiological Association, this article is part of a series on burden of disease, health indicators and the challenges faced by epidemiologists in bringing their discoveries to provide equitable benefit to the populations in their regions and globally. This report covers the health status and epidemiological capacity in the North American region (USA and Canada).
We assessed data from country-specific sources to identify health priorities and areas of greatest need for modifiable risk factors. We examined inequalities in health as a function of social deprivation. We also reviewed information on epidemiological capacity building and scientific contributions by epidemiologists in the region.
The USA and Canada enjoy technologically advanced healthcare systems that, in principle, prioritize preventive services. Both countries experience a life expectancy at birth that is higher than the global mean. Health indicator measures are consistently worse in the USA than in Canada for many outcomes, although typically by only marginal amounts. Socio-economic and racial/ethnic disparities in indicators exist for many diseases and risk factors in the USA. To a lesser extent, these social inequalities also exist in Canada, particularly among the Aboriginal populations. Epidemiology is a well-established discipline in the region, with many degree-granting schools, societies and job opportunities in the public and private sectors. North American epidemiologists have made important contributions in disease control and prevention and provide nearly a third of the global scientific output via published papers.
Critical challenges for North American epidemiologists include social determinants of disease distribution and the underlying inequalities in access to and benefit from preventive services and healthcare, particularly in the USA. The gains in life expectancy also underscore the need for research on health promotion and prevention of disease and disability in older adults. The diversity in epidemiological subspecialties poses new challenges in training and accreditation and has occurred in parallel with a decrease in research funding.
PubMed ID
22407862 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can deaths in police cells be prevented? Experience from Norway and death rates in other countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276346
Source
J Forensic Leg Med. 2016 Jan;37:61-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Willy Aasebø
Gunnar Orskaug
Jan Erikssen
Source
J Forensic Leg Med. 2016 Jan;37:61-5
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality
Australasia - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Intracranial Hemorrhages - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
North America - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Police
Prisoners
Retrospective Studies
Substance-Related Disorders - mortality
Suicide - statistics & numerical data - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe the changes in death rates and causes of deaths in Norwegian police cells during the last 2 decades. To review reports on death rates in police cells that have been published in medical journals and elsewhere, and discuss the difficulties of comparing death rates between countries.
Data on deaths in Norwegian police cells were collected retrospectively in 2002 and 2012 for two time periods: 1993-2001 (period 1) and 2003-2012 (period 2). Several databases were searched to find reports on deaths in police cells from as many countries as possible.
The death rates in Norwegian police cells reduced significantly from 0.83 deaths per year per million inhabitants (DYM) in period 1 to 0.22 DYM in period 2 (p 
PubMed ID
26595087 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can rheumatoid arthritis (RA) registries provide contextual safety data for modern RA clinical trials? The case for mortality and cardiovascular disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282349
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2016 Oct;75(10):1797-805
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Kaleb Michaud
Niklas Berglind
Stefan Franzén
Thomas Frisell
Christopher Garwood
Jeffrey D Greenberg
Meilien Ho
Marie Holmqvist
Laura Horne
Eisuke Inoue
Fredrik Nyberg
Dimitrios A Pappas
George Reed
Deborah Symmons
Eiichi Tanaka
Trung N Tran
Suzanne M M Verstappen
Eveline Wesby-van Swaay
Hisashi Yamanaka
Johan Askling
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2016 Oct;75(10):1797-805
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - drug therapy
Bias (epidemiology)
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
India - epidemiology
Japan - epidemiology
Latin America - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
North America - epidemiology
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We implemented a novel method for providing contextual adverse event rates for a randomised controlled trial (RCT) programme through coordinated analyses of five RA registries, focusing here on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality.
Each participating registry (Consortium of Rheumatology Researchers of North America (CORRONA) (USA), Swedish Rheumatology Quality of Care Register (SRR) (Sweden), Norfolk Arthritis Register (NOAR) (UK), CORRONA International (East Europe, Latin America, India) and Institute of Rheumatology, Rheumatoid Arthritis (IORRA) (Japan)) defined a main cohort from January 2000 onwards. To address comparability and potential bias, we harmonised event definitions and defined several subcohorts for sensitivity analyses based on disease activity, treatment, calendar time, duration of follow-up and RCT exclusions. Rates were standardised for age, sex and, in one sensitivity analysis, also HAQ.
The combined registry cohorts included 57 251 patients with RA (234 089 person-years)-24.5% men, mean (SD) baseline age 58.2 (13.8) and RA duration 8.2 (11.7) years. Standardised registry mortality rates (per 100 person-years) varied from 0.42 (CORRONA) to 0.80 (NOAR), with 0.60 for RCT patients. Myocardial infarction and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) rates ranged from 0.09 and 0.31 (IORRA) to 0.39 and 0.77 (SRR), with RCT rates intermediate (0.18 and 0.42), respectively. Additional subcohort analyses showed small and mostly consistent changes across registries, retaining reasonable consistency in rates across the Western registries. Additional standardisation for HAQ returned higher mortality and MACE registry rates.
This coordinated approach to contextualising RA RCT safety data demonstrated reasonable differences and consistency in rates for mortality and CVD across registries, and comparable RCT rates, and may serve as a model method to supplement clinical trial analyses for drug development programmes.
PubMed ID
26857699 View in PubMed
Less detail

63 records – page 1 of 7.