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558 records – page 1 of 56.

Aboriginal youth in Canada: a profile based upon 1981 census data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39493
Source
Can Stat Rev. 1985 Sep;60(9):vi-
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1985
Author
G E Priest
Source
Can Stat Rev. 1985 Sep;60(9):vi-
Date
Sep-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas
Canada
Censuses
Comparative Study
Culture
Demography
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Employment
Ethnic Groups
Family Characteristics
Income
Indians, North American
Industry
North America
Occupations
Population
Population Characteristics
Research
Unemployment
Abstract
An analysis of the data from the 1981 census of Canada is presented concerning the aboriginal population aged 15 to 24, defined as including the Inuit, status Indian, non-status Indian, and Metis populations. Comparisons are made with the non-aboriginal population. Factors considered include geographic location, migration, family status, dependent children, educational status, labor force participation, unemployment, income, and industry.
PubMed ID
12340640 View in PubMed
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Abortion, 1973: some recent world events in relation to pregnancy termination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66364
Source
Trans Aust Med Congr. 1974 Jun 1;1(5):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1974
Source
Trans Aust Med Congr. 1974 Jun 1;1(5):27-30
Date
Jun-1-1974
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Americas
Developed Countries
Europe
Europe, Eastern
Family Planning Services
France
Germany, East
Germany, West
Great Britain
Italy
Netherlands
North America
Norway
Scandinavia
Sweden
United States
Abstract
This selective report notes recent events relating to pregnancy termination in the U.S., France, England, Italy, East and West Germany, Norway, Sweden, and the Netherlands. Due to the Supreme Court decision in January 1973, abortion is now legal in the U.S. Although abortions is illegal in France, an estimated 400,000-1,000,000 clandestine abortions occur each year. Although abortions are legal in Britain, the ease with which they can be obtained varies regionally. As of March 1973, contraceptives are part of Britain's National Health Service. In Italy, a bill to legalize abortion has been introduced in Parliament, though there is little likelihood of its passing. In East Germany, abortion can be granted for medical or social reasons, while in West Germany, the governmental policies are more conservative, resulting in an abundance of illegal abortions performed by physicians. There is a trend toward easier abortion laws in Norway and Sweden. Little is happening in the Netherlands as far as liberalizing the abortion laws. Rather liberal grounds for pregnancy termination exist in China (though emphasis is on contraception), India, Russia, and Eastern Europe (with the exception of Romania). Abortion is frowned upon in Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East resulting in a large number of illegal abortions. It is concluded that there is liberalized abortion in communist bloc countries, there is trend toward liberalizing abortion in a large group of western countries, and tradition and religion are responsible for conservative abortion laws in a third group of countries.
PubMed ID
12333737 View in PubMed
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Access 360 : Your guide to services and opportunity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301470
Source
CIRI - Cook Inlet Tribal Council. Annual issue. Issue 08.
Date
Spring 2014
  1 document  
Source
CIRI - Cook Inlet Tribal Council. Annual issue. Issue 08.
Date
Spring 2014
Geographic Location
U.S.
File Size
6186471
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Indians of North America
Notes
A directory for Alaska Native and American Indian families in the Cook Inlet region of Alaska
2014 NYO Games Alaska Program & Event Guide.
Documents
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Access to care: crisis for Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290926
Source
Anchorage : Alaska Native Health Board. 54 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1991
Author
Task Force on Patient Travel
Alaska Native Health Board
Source
Anchorage : Alaska Native Health Board. 54 pages.
Date
1991
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Statistics
Medical carae
Eskimos
Indians of North America
Notes
ALASKA RA448.5.I5A32 1991
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Accident and injury: comparison of statistics recorded during ambulatory patient care visits, FY1976 - FY1972.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288844
Source
Anchorage : Office of Systems Development, Dept. of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, Health Services admin., Indian Health Service, Alaska Area Native Health Service. 51 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1977
Source
Anchorage : Office of Systems Development, Dept. of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, Health Services admin., Indian Health Service, Alaska Area Native Health Service. 51 pages.
Date
1977
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Accidents
Alaska
Statistics
Wounds and Injuries
Eskimos
Medical care
Indians of North America
Aleuts
Notes
ALASKA RA407.4.A4A22 1977
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Accident and injury: comparison of statistics recorded through inpatient admissions to Aslka Native Health Service facilities, FY1976 - FY1972.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288845
Source
Anchorage : Office of Systems development, Dept. of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, Health Services Admin., Indian Health Service, Alaska Area Native Health Service. 48 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1977
Source
Anchorage : Office of Systems development, Dept. of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, Health Services Admin., Indian Health Service, Alaska Area Native Health Service. 48 pages.
Date
1977
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Accidents
Alaska
Statistics
Wounds and Injuries
Eskimos
Medical care
Indians of North America
Aleuts
Notes
ALASKA RA407.4.A4A23 1977
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ACTN3 R577X and other polymorphisms are not associated with elite endurance athlete status in the Genathlete study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140771
Source
J Sports Sci. 2010 Oct;28(12):1355-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Frank E Döring
Simone Onur
Ulf Geisen
Marcel R Boulay
Louis Pérusse
Tuomo Rankinen
Rainer Rauramaa
Bernd Wolfahrt
C. Bouchard
Author Affiliation
Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kiel, Germany. vgoyrgoy@phyed.duth.gr
Source
J Sports Sci. 2010 Oct;28(12):1355-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinin - genetics
Athletes
Athletic Performance
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Germany
Homozygote
Humans
Male
North America
Odds Ratio
Physical Endurance - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Abstract
Homozygosity for a premature stop codon at amino acid position 577 in the alpha-actinin-3 (ACTN3) gene leads to a-actinin-3 deficiency. This genotype is observed in approximately 18% of Caucasians. The ACTN3 R577X polymorphism has been previously associated with indicators of physical performance in several, but not all, studies. We examined the prevalence of R577X (rs1815739) and two additional haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (htSNPs) of the ACTN3 gene (rs1791690 and rs2275998) in the Genathlete study comprising 316 male elite endurance athletes (VO2max 79.0+3.5 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1); mean +/- s) from North America, Finland, and Germany and 304 sedentary controls (VO2max 40.1+7.0 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1) matched by country of origin. The distribution of genotype and allele frequencies between the two groups was tested by Pearson chi-square and/or Fischer exact test. The prevalence of the 577X homozygote genotype was similar in endurance athletes and controls (20% and 17.5%, respectively). The resulting odds ratio for endurance performance in 577X homozygotes compared with 577R-allele carriers was 1.24 (95%CI 0.82-1.87, P = 0.3). The genotype distribution of the two htSNPs and haplotype frequencies did not differ significantly between athletes and controls. In conclusion, our findings indicate that ACTN3 R577X and other SNPs in ACTN3 are not genetic determinants of endurance performance in Caucasian males.
PubMed ID
20845221 View in PubMed
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Acute myeloid leukemia following Hodgkin lymphoma: a population-based study of 35,511 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16487
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Feb 1;98(3):215-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2006
Author
Sara J Schonfeld
Ethel S Gilbert
Graça M Dores
Charles F Lynch
David C Hodgson
Per Hall
Hans Storm
Aage Andersen
Eero Pukkala
Eric Holowaty
Magnus Kaijser
Michael Andersson
Heikki Joensuu
Sophie D Fosså
James M Allan
Lois B Travis
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892-7238, USA.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Feb 1;98(3):215-8
Date
Feb-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hodgkin Disease - drug therapy - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Second Primary - chemically induced - epidemiology
North America - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Research Design
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Risk assessment
SEER Program
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
Treatments for Hodgkin lymphoma are associated with large relative risks of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but there are few estimates of the excess absolute risk (EAR), a useful measure of disease burden. One-year Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (N = 35,511) were identified within 14 population-based cancer registries in Nordic countries and North America from January 1, 1970, through December 31, 2001. We used Poisson regression analysis to model the EAR of AML, per 10,000 person-years. A total of 217 Hodgkin lymphoma survivors were diagnosed with AML (10.8 expected; unadjusted EAR = 6.2; 95% confidence interval = 5.4 to 7.1). Excess absolute risk for AML was highest during the first 10 years after Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis but remained elevated thereafter. In subsequent analyses, adjusted for time since Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis and presented for the 5-9 year interval, the EAR was statistically significantly (P or = 35 age groups, respectively), which may be associated with modifications in chemotherapy.
PubMed ID
16449681 View in PubMed
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Source
Evolution. 2004 Aug;58(8):1748-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Bradshaw William E
Zani Peter A
Holzapfel Christina M
Author Affiliation
Center for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403-5289, USA. bradshaw@darkwing.uoregon.edu
Source
Evolution. 2004 Aug;58(8):1748-62
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Climate
Culicidae - genetics - physiology
Environment, Controlled
Evolution
Geography
North America
Photoperiod
Reproduction - physiology
Selection (Genetics)
Temperature
Abstract
Only model organisms live in a world of endless summer. Fitness at temperate latitudes reflects the ability of organisms in nature to exploit the favorable season, to mitigate the effects of the unfavorable season, and to make the timely switch from one life style to the other. Herein, we define fitness as Ry, the year-long cohort replacement rate across all four seasons, of the mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii, reared in its natural microhabitat in processor-controlled environment rooms. First, we exposed cohorts of W. smithii, from southern, midlatitude, and northern populations (30-50 degrees N) to southern and northern thermal years during which we factored out evolved differences in photoperiodic response. We found clear evidence of evolved differences in heat and cold tolerance among populations. Relative cold tolerance of northern populations became apparent when populations were stressed to the brink of extinction; relative heat tolerance of southern populations became apparent when the adverse effects of heat could accumulate over several generations. Second, we exposed southern, midlatitude, and northern populations to natural, midlatitude day lengths in a thermally benign midlatitude thermal year. We found that evolved differences in photoperiodic response (1) prevented the timely entry of southern populations into diapause resulting in a 74% decline in fitness, and (2) forced northern populations to endure a warm-season diapause resulting in an 88% decline in fitness. We argue that reciprocal transplants across latitudes in nature always confound the effects of the thermal and photic environment on fitness. Yet, to our knowledge, no one has previously held the thermal year constant while varying the photic year. This distinction is crucial in evaluating the potential impact of climate change. Because global warming in the Northern Hemisphere is proceeding faster at northern than at southern latitudes and because this change represents an amelioration of the thermal environment and a concomitant increase in the duration of the growing season, we conclude that there should be more rapid evolution of photoperiodic response than of thermal tolerance as a consequence of global warming among northern, temperate ectotherms.
PubMed ID
15446427 View in PubMed
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558 records – page 1 of 56.