Skip header and navigation

Refine By

24 records – page 1 of 3.

Age, sleep and irregular workhours: A field study with electroencephalographic recordings, catecholamine excretion and self-ratings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99134
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1981 Sep;7(3):196-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1981
Author
L. Torsvall
T. Akerstedt
M. Gillberg
Author Affiliation
The Laboratory for Clinical Stress Research, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1981 Sep;7(3):196-203
Date
Sep-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Catecholamines - urine
Epinephrine - urine
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norepinephrine - urine
Polysomnography
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm - diagnosis - physiopathology
Sleep Stages
Sweden
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Abstract
Day sleep (after night work) and night sleep (after day work) were studied in two groups of locomotive engineers aged 25-35 and 50-60 a, respectively. All recordings were made in the homes of the subjects. For both groups day sleep was reduced by approximately 3.3 h, mainly affecting rapid eye movement sleep and stage 2 sleep. Diuresis and the excretion of noradrenaline were increased during day sleep. The ratings of sleepiness were higher after night work than after day work. Several indices of disturbed daytime sleep correlated significantly with catecholamine excretion. The age groups differed mainly in that the older subjects had relatively more stage shifts, awakenings, stage 1 sleep, a higher diuresis, and a higher noradrenaline excretion during day sleep. It was concluded that night work is detrimental to sleep and that negative effects are exacerbated by increasing age.
PubMed ID
20120585 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood pressure response to treatment of obese vs non-obese adults with sleep apnea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308967
Source
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2019 10; 21(10):1580-1590
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2019
Author
Samuel T Kuna
Raymond R Townsend
Brendan T Keenan
David Maislin
Thorarinn Gislason
Bryndís Benediktsdóttir
Sigrun Gudmundsdóttir
Erna Sif Arnardóttir
Andrea Sifferman
Beth Staley
Frances M Pack
Xiaofeng Guo
Richard J Schwab
Greg Maislin
Julio A Chirinos
Allan I Pack
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
Source
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2019 10; 21(10):1580-1590
Date
10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arterial Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - methods
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Intra-Abdominal Fat - growth & development
Male
Middle Aged
Norepinephrine - urine
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - metabolism - physiopathology - therapy
Sympathetic Nervous System - physiopathology
Waist Circumference - physiology
Abstract
Many patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but not all, have a reduction in blood pressure (BP) with positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment. Our objective was to determine whether the BP response following PAP treatment is related to obesity. A total of 188 adults with OSA underwent 24-hour BP monitoring and 24-hour urinary norepinephrine collection at baseline. Obesity was assessed by waist circumference, body mass index, and abdominal visceral fat volume. Participants adherent to PAP treatment were reassessed after 4 months. Primary outcomes were 24-hour mean arterial pressure (MAP) and 24-hour urinary norepinephrine level. Obstructive sleep apnea participants had a significant reduction in 24-hour MAP following PAP treatment (-1.22 [95% CI: -2.38, -0.06] mm Hg; P = .039). No significant correlations were present with any of the 3 obesity measures for BP or urinary norepinephrine measures at baseline in all OSA participants or for changes in BP measures in participants adherent to PAP treatment. Changes in BP measures following treatment were not correlated with baseline or change in urinary norepinephrine. Similar results were obtained when BP or urinary norepinephrine measures were compared between participants dichotomized using the sex-specific median of each obesity measure. Greater reductions in urinary norepinephrine were correlated with higher waist circumference (rho = -0.21, P = .037), with a greater decrease from baseline in obese compared to non-obese participants (-6.26 [-8.82, -3.69] vs -2.14 [-4.63, 0.35] ng/mg creatinine; P = .027). The results indicate that the BP response to PAP treatment in adults with OSA is not related to obesity or urinary norepinephrine levels.
Notes
CommentIn: J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2019 Oct;21(10):1591-1593 PMID 31532571
PubMed ID
31532580 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Catecholamine excretion in children born in a state of asphyxia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13407
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1973;3:41-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973

[Catecholemine excretion in young children with acute gastrointestinal diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13440
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1972 May-Jun;3:7-8
Publication Type
Article

[Dynamics of the changes in metabolic and endocrine processes in helicopter crews on commercial flights]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12813
Source
Kosm Biol Aviakosm Med. 1984 Mar-Apr;18(2):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
I M Nosova
T A Drobyshevskaia
N A Osadchieva
Source
Kosm Biol Aviakosm Med. 1984 Mar-Apr;18(2):43-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Epinephrine - urine
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Humans
Hydrocortisone - analysis
Insulin - blood
Lactates - blood
Lactic Acid
Middle Aged
Norepinephrine - urine
Time Factors
Tropical Climate
USSR
Abstract
Metabolic and hormonal variations of crewmembers of MI-6 and MI-8 helicopters were investigated. The investigation was performed on 61 pilots, including 18 in the hot and 43 in the cold climate. The following parameters were measured before and after flight: nonesterified fatty acids, lactic acid, insulin, and cortisol in blood, and catecholamines and cortisol in urine. In the hot climate the content of nonesterified fatty acids, lactic acid and insulin increased. The renal excretion of catecholamines and cortisol grew drastically. In the cold climate nonesterified fatty acids increased postflight. Insulin, catecholamines and cortisol tended to grow.
PubMed ID
6371373 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of cold exposure on urinary catecholamines in arctic lemmings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13188
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol C. 1977;58(2C):133-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977

Hormone response of normal and intermittent cold-preadapted humans to continuous cold.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12930
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1982 Sep;53(3):610-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1982
Author
M W Radomski
C. Boutelier
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1982 Sep;53(3):610-6
Date
Sep-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
17-Hydroxycorticosteroids - urine
Acclimatization
Adult
Cold
Comparative Study
Diuresis
Epinephrine - urine
Hormones - physiology
Humans
Male
Norepinephrine - urine
Time Factors
Abstract
This study examined the hormonal and thermal responses of two groups of subjects during 16 days in the Arctic (mean temperature -26.8 degrees C). One group (NPA) received no prior cold exposure, whereas the second group (PA) was subjected to nine daily immersions (20-40 min) in cold water (15 degrees C) 20 days before the Arctic exposure. Nude cold tolerance tests (cold air at 10 degrees C) were administered to both groups before and after the Arctic exposure. The NPA group showed an increase in metabolism and rectal temperature, whereas the PA group showed no elevation in metabolism and a decrease in rectal temperature. In the Arctic significant daily increases over the control period of urine volume (+86%), urinary norepinephrine (+48%), epinephrine (+84%), and 17-hydroxycorticosteroids (+34%) occurred in the NPA group. Only epinephrine (+65%) increased in the PA group. The hormonal and thermal responses of the NPA group in the Arctic were characteristic of metabolic adaption, whereas those in the PA group were suggestive of a hypothermic type of adaptation or habituation with no evidence of sympathetic or adrenocortical stimulation. The hormonal and thermal responses observed in this study indicate that a degree of cold resistance can be induced rapidly in humans by short intermittent exposures to an intense cold stress, which persists for a significant period of time after the last exposure.
PubMed ID
7129981 View in PubMed
Less detail

24 records – page 1 of 3.