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20 years of health promotion research in the Nordic countries: Health, wellbeing and physical activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301447
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 2018; 46(Suppl 20): 3–6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
Network (NHPRN) has organised the Nordic Health Promotion Research Conferences (NHPRC). The most recent NHPRC in 2016 was a celebration of its twenty years anniversary, whereby the 8th NHPRC theme was named accordingly ‘20 years of Health Promotion Research in the Nordic countries: health, wellbeing
  1 document  
Author
Sami Kokko
Anne Liveng
Steffen Torp
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 2018; 46(Suppl 20): 3–6
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
73179
Keywords
Nordic countries
Health promotion
Documents
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Addressing individual behaviours and living conditions: Four Nordic public health policies

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101197
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(6 suppl):6-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Vallgårda, S
Author Affiliation
Unit of Health Services Research, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(6 suppl):6-10
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Health Policy
Health promotion
Liberalism
Nordic countries
Public Health
Responsibility
Social Conditions
Social democracy
Abstract
AIMS: To identify characteristics of the public health policies of four Nordic countries concerning how they present the causes of ill health, the best ways to deal with these causes, and where to place responsibility; additionally, to investigate whether there is a common Nordic policy. METHODS: Analyses of recent public health programs in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. RESULTS: Focus is on either, or both, individual behavior and living conditions as causes of ill health; the remedies are classical liberal as well as social democratic policies. None of the programs is consistent with either ideological strand; each has its peculiar combination of interpretations and policies. The Danish program is the most liberal focusing on behaviors and individual's choices; the Norwegian program is the most social democratic or social liberal focusing mostly on the social and physical environment and the politicians' responsibility to improve the population's health. The Swedish and the Finnish programs lie between those of Denmark and Norway. The Finnish and Norwegian governments stress their responsibility for the health of the population. CONCLUSIONS: No common Nordic political approach to public health exists. All programs contain contradictory policies and ideological statements with differences regarding the emphasis on individual behavior versus choice and living conditions and political responsibility. The policies are not entirely predictable from the political stance of the government; national differences seem to play a role.
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Adherence to a Healthy Nordic Diet and Risk of Stroke: A Danish Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282576
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):259-264
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Kim Overvad
Cecilie Kyrø
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Søren Paaske Johnsen
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):259-264
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Healthy Diet - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries - epidemiology
Stroke - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Abstract
Specific dietary patterns, including the Mediterranean diet, have been associated with stroke prevention. Our aim was to investigate whether adherence to a healthy Nordic diet, including fish, apples and pears, cabbages, root vegetables, rye bread, and oatmeal, was associated with risk of stroke.
Incident cases of stroke among 55?338 men and women from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort were identified from the Danish National Patient Register and verified by review of records. Cases of ischemic stroke were further subclassified based on etiology according to the TOAST classification system (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment). Information on diet was collected at baseline (1993-1997) using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazards ratios of total stroke and subtypes of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.
During a median follow-up of 13.5 years, 2283 cases of incident stroke were verified, including 1879 ischemic strokes. Adherence to a healthy Nordic diet, as reflected by a higher Healthy Nordic Food Index score, was associated with a lower risk of stroke. The hazards ratio comparing an index score of 4 to 6 (high adherence) with an index score of 0 to 1 (low adherence) was 0.86 (95% confidence interval 0.76-0.98) for total stroke. Inverse associations were observed for ischemic stroke, including large-artery atherosclerosis. No trend was observed for hemorrhagic stroke; however, a statistically insignificant trend was observed for intracerebral hemorrhage.
Our findings suggest that a healthy Nordic diet may be recommended for the prevention of stroke.
PubMed ID
28049735 View in PubMed
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Admixture and gene flow from Russia in the recovering Northern European brown bear (Ursus arctos).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259339
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(5):e97558
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Alexander Kopatz
Hans Geir Eiken
Jouni Aspi
Ilpo Kojola
Camilla Tobiassen
Konstantin F Tirronen
Pjotr I Danilov
Snorre B Hagen
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(5):e97558
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Finland
Gene Flow - genetics
Genetic Variation
Microsatellite Repeats
Norway
Russia
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Sweden
Ursidae - genetics
Abstract
Large carnivores were persecuted to near extinction during the last centuries, but have now recovered in some countries. It has been proposed earlier that the recovery of the Northern European brown bear is supported by migration from Russia. We tested this hypothesis by obtaining for the first time continuous sampling of the whole Finnish bear population, which is located centrally between the Russian and Scandinavian bear populations. The Finnish population is assumed to experience high gene flow from Russian Karelia. If so, no or a low degree of genetic differentiation between Finnish and Russian bears could be expected. We have genotyped bears extensively from all over Finland using 12 validated microsatellite markers and compared their genetic composition to bears from Russian Karelia, Sweden, and Norway. Our fine masked investigation identified two overlapping genetic clusters structured by isolation-by-distance in Finland (pairwise FST = 0.025). One cluster included Russian bears, and migration analyses showed a high number of migrants from Russia into Finland, providing evidence of eastern gene flow as an important driver during recovery. In comparison, both clusters excluded bears from Sweden and Norway, and we found no migrants from Finland in either country, indicating that eastern gene flow was probably not important for the population recovery in Scandinavia. Our analyses on different spatial scales suggest a continuous bear population in Finland and Russian Karelia, separated from Scandinavia.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24839968 View in PubMed
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Amphibian recovery after a decrease in acidic precipitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295731
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(3):355-367
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Dag Dolmen
Anders Gravbrøt Finstad
Jon Kristian Skei
Author Affiliation
Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU University Museum, 7491, Trondheim, Norway. dag.dolmen@ntnu.no.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(3):355-367
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Amphibians
Animals
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Norway
Population Dynamics
Rain
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Abstract
We here report the first sign of amphibian recovery after a strong decline due to acidic precipitation over many decades and peaking around 1980-90. In 2010, the pH level of ponds and small lakes in two heavily acidified areas in southwestern Scandinavia (Aust-Agder and Østfold in Norway) had risen significantly at an (arithmetic) average of 0.14 since 1988-89. Parallel with the general rise in pH, amphibians (Rana temporaria, R. arvalis, Bufo bufo, Lissotriton vulgaris, and Triturus cristatus) had become significantly more common: the frequency of amphibian localities rose from 33% to 49% (n = 115), and the average number of amphibian species per locality had risen from 0.51 to 0.88. In two other (reference) areas, one with better buffering capacity (Telemark, n = 21) and the other with much less input of acidic precipitation (Nord-Trøndelag, n = 106), there were no significant changes in pH or amphibians.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29164539 View in PubMed
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Analysis of stimulant drugs in the wastewater of five Nordic capitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295878
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Jun 15; 627:1039-1047
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-15-2018
Author
Arndís Sue Ching Löve
Jose Antonio Baz-Lomba
Malcolm J Reid
Aino Kankaanpää
Teemu Gunnar
Maria Dam
Kristín Ólafsdóttir
Kevin V Thomas
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Hofsvallagata 53, 107 Reykjavik, Iceland. Electronic address: asl2@hi.is.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Jun 15; 627:1039-1047
Date
Jun-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cities
Denmark
Environmental monitoring
Europe
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Street Drugs - analysis
Substance Abuse Detection
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Waste Water - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Wastewater-based epidemiology is an efficient way to assess illicit drug use, complementing currently used methods retrieved from different data sources. The aim of this study is to compare stimulant drug use in five Nordic capital cities that include for the first time wastewater samples from Torshavn in the Faroe Islands. Currently there are no published reports that compare stimulant drug use in these Nordic capitals. All wastewater samples were analyzed using solid phase extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The results were compared with data published by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction based on illicit drugs in wastewater from over 50 European cities. Confirming previous reports, the results showed high amphetamine loads compared with other European countries. Very little apparent abuse of stimulant drugs was detected in Torshavn. Methamphetamine loads were the highest from Helsinki of the Nordic countries, indicating substantial fluctuations in the availability of the drug compared with previous studies. Methamphetamine loads from Oslo confirmed that the use continues to be high. Estimated cocaine use was found to be in the lower range compared with other cities in the southern and western part of Europe. Ecstasy and cocaine showed clear variations between weekdays and weekends, indicating recreational use. This study further demonstrates geographical trends in the stimulant drug market in five Nordic capitals, which enables a better comparison with other areas of the continent.
PubMed ID
29426122 View in PubMed
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Assessing the role of GPs in Nordic health care systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290285
Source
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl). 2016 May 03; 29(2):122-35
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-03-2016
Author
Randolph K Quaye
Author Affiliation
World Studies Department, Ohio Wesleyan University , Delaware, Ohio, USA.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl). 2016 May 03; 29(2):122-35
Date
May-03-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care
Denmark
Finland
General practitioners
Humans
Norway
Physician's Role
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Sweden
Abstract
Purpose This paper examines the changing role of general practitioners (GPs) in Nordic countries of Sweden, Norway and Denmark. It aims to explore the "gate keeping" role of GPs in the face of current changes in the health care delivery systems in these countries. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected from existing literature, interviews with GPs, hospital specialists and representatives of Danish regions and Norwegian Medical Association. Findings The paper contends that in all these changes, the position of the GPs in the medical division of labor has been strengthened, and patients now have increased and broadened access to choice. Research limitations/implications Health care cost and high cancer mortality rates have forced Nordic countries of Sweden, Norway and Denmark to rethink their health care systems. Several attempts have been made to reduce health care cost through market reform and by strenghtening the position of GPs. The evidence suggests that in Norway and Denmark, right incentives are in place to achieve this goal. Sweden is not far behind. The paper has limitations of a small sample size and an exclusive focus on GPs. Practical implications Anecdotal evidence suggests that physicians are becoming extremely unhappy. Understanding the changing status of primary care physicians will yield valuable information for assessing the effectiveness of Nordic health care delivery systems. Social implications This study has wider implications of how GPs see their role as potential gatekeepers in the Nordic health care systems. The role of GPs is changing as a result of recent health care reforms. Originality/value This paper contends that in Norway and Denmark, right incentives are in place to strengthen the position of GPs.
PubMed ID
27198702 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence in northern Finland: a registry and autopsy study

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76551
Source
Pages 256-260 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Ci:paumpo1.ar dtK1Zth 84:256-260 CANCER INCJDENCE IN NORTHERN FilK./\ND: FREJ STENBACIC Reports of cancer incidence in the Nordic countries are regarded as being among the most reliable owing to long clinical experience. extensive reporting systems, and the high sta~dard of medical
  1 document  
Author
Stenbäck, F.
Author Affiliation
Nordic Council for Arctic Medical Research, Finland
Source
Pages 256-260 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Date
1985
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Clinical confirmation rate
Clinical detection rate
Latitude gradient
Nordic countries
Registry data
Tumor incidence
Documents
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Cancer in immigrants as a pointer to the causes of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262730
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Aug;24 Suppl 1:64-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Kari Hemminki
Asta Försti
Meriem Khyatti
Wagida A Anwar
Mohsen Mousavi
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Aug;24 Suppl 1:64-71
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Causality
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Finland - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries - ethnology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The early cancer studies on immigrants, which started to appear some 50 years ago, showed that the incidence in cancers changes to the level of the new host country in one or two generations. These findings were fundamental to the understanding of the environmental etiology of human cancer. Many immigrant groups originate from countries with no cancer registration, and, hence, the immigrant studies may provide estimates on the indigenous cancer rates. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database has been an important source of data for immigrant studies on various diseases. The Database covers the Swedish population of the past 100 years, and it records the country of birth for each subject. A total of 1.79 million individuals were foreign born, Finns and other Scandinavians being the largest immigrant groups. Over the course of years, some 30 publications have appeared relating to cancer in immigrants. In the present article, we will review more recent immigrant studies, mainly among Swedish immigrants, on all cancers and emphasize the differences between ethnic groups. In the second part, we discuss the problem of reliable registration of cancer and compare cancer incidence among non-European immigrants with cancer incidence in countries of origin, as these have now active cancer registries. We discuss the experiences in cancer registration in Morocco and Egypt. We show the usefulness and limitations in predicting cancer incidence in the countries of origin.
PubMed ID
25108000 View in PubMed
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Can interprofessional teamwork reduce patient throughput times? A longitudinal single-centre study of three different triage processes at a Swedish emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298608
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 04 19; 8(4):e019744
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-19-2018
Author
Jenny Liu
Italo Masiello
Sari Ponzer
Nasim Farrokhnia
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 04 19; 8(4):e019744
Date
04-19-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Patient care team
Retrospective Studies
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Sweden
Time Factors
Triage
Abstract
To determine the impact on emergency department (ED) throughput times and proportion of patients who leave without being seen by a physician (LWBS) of two triage interventions, where comprehensive nurse-led triage was first replaced by senior physician-led triage and then by interprofessional teamwork.
Single-centre before-and-after study.
Adult ED of a Swedish urban hospital.
Patients arriving on weekdays 08:00 to 21:00 during three 1-year periods in the interval May 2012 to November 2015. A total of 185 806 arrivals were included.
Senior physicians replaced triage nurses May 2013 to May 2014. Interprofessional teamwork replaced the triage process on weekdays 08:00 to 21:00 November 2014 to November 2015.
Primary outcomes were the median time to physician (TTP) and the median length of stay (LOS). Secondary outcome was the LWBS rate.
The crude median LOS was shortest for teamwork, 228?min (95%?CI 226.4 to 230.5) compared with 232?min (95%?CI 230.8 to 233.9) for nurse-led and 250?min (95%?CI 248.5 to 252.6) for physician-led triage. The adjusted LOS for the teamwork period was 16?min shorter than for nurse-led triage and 23?min shorter than for physician-led triage. The median TTP was shortest for physician-led triage, 56?min (95%?CI 54.5 to 56.6) compared with 116?min (95%?CI 114.4 to 117.5) for nurse-led triage and 74?min (95%?CI 72.7 to 74.8) for teamwork. The LWBS rate was 1.9% for nurse-led triage, 1.2% for physician-led triage and 3.2% for teamwork. All outcome measure differences had two-tailed p values
PubMed ID
29674366 View in PubMed
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64 records – page 1 of 7.