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163 records – page 1 of 17.

24-hour noise dose and risk assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186267
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2003 Apr;18(4):232-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003

Acceptable noise level (ANL) with Danish and non-semantic speech materials in adult hearing-aid users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123124
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Sep;51(9):678-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Steen Østergaard Olsen
Johannes Lantz
Lars Holme Nielsen
K Jonas Brännström
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Research Laboratory, University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. steen.olsen@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Sep;51(9):678-88
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Audiometry, Speech
Auditory Threshold
Correction of Hearing Impairment
Denmark
Female
Hearing Aids
Hearing Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise - adverse effects
Patient satisfaction
Perceptual Masking
Persons With Hearing Impairments - psychology - rehabilitation
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Semantics
Sound Spectrography
Speech Perception
Abstract
The acceptable noise level (ANL) test is used for quantification of the amount of background noise subjects accept when listening to speech. This study investigates Danish hearing-aid users' ANL performance using Danish and non-semantic speech signals, the repeatability of ANL, and the association between ANL and outcome of the international outcome inventory for hearing aids (IOI-HA).
ANL was measured in three conditions in both ears at two test sessions. Subjects completed the IOI-HA and the ANL questionnaire.
Sixty-three Danish hearing-aid users; fifty-seven subjects were full time users and 6 were part time/non users of hearing aids according to the ANL questionnaire.
ANLs were similar to results with American English speech material. The coefficient of repeatability (CR) was 6.5-8.8 dB. IOI-HA scores were not associated to ANL.
Danish and non-semantic ANL versions yield results similar to the American English version. The magnitude of the CR indicates that ANL with Danish and non-semantic speech materials is not suitable for prediction of individual patterns of future hearing-aid use or evaluation of individual benefit from hearing-aid features. The ANL with Danish and non-semantic speech materials is not related to IOI-HA outcome.
PubMed ID
22731922 View in PubMed
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Acceptable noise level: repeatability with Danish and non-semantic speech materials for adults with normal hearing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124904
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Jul;51(7):557-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Steen Østergaard Olsen
Lars Holme Nielsen
Johannes Lantz
K Jonas Brännström
Author Affiliation
Research Laboratory, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. steen.olsen@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Jul;51(7):557-63
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Audiometry, Speech - methods
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise - adverse effects
Perceptual Masking
Predictive value of tests
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Semantics
Speech Perception
Young Adult
Abstract
The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjects using running Danish and non-semantic speech materials as stimuli and modulated speech-spectrum and multi-talker babble noises as competing stimuli.
ANL was measured in both ears at two test sessions separated by a period ranging from 12 to 77 days. At each session the measurements at the first and the second ear were separated in time by 15-30 minutes. Bland-Altman plots and calculation of the coefficient of repeatability (CR) were used to estimate the repeatability.
Thirty nine normal-hearing subjects.
The ANL CR was 6.0-8.9 dB for repeated tests separated by about 15-30 minutes and 7.2-10.2 dB for repeated tests separated by 12 days or more.
The ANL test has poor repeatability when assessed with Danish and non-semantic speech materials on normal-hearing subjects. The same CR among hearing-impaired subjects would imply too poor repeatability to predict individual patterns of future hearing-aid use.
PubMed ID
22537032 View in PubMed
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Acoustic vector sensor beamforming reduces masking from underwater industrial noise during passive monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289717
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2016
Author
Aaron M Thode
Katherine H Kim
Robert G Norman
Susanna B Blackwell
Charles R Greene
Author Affiliation
Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, California 92093-0205, USA athode@ucsd.edu.
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Date
04-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acoustics - instrumentation
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - instrumentation - methods
Equipment Design
Models, Theoretical
Motion
Noise - adverse effects
Oceans and Seas
Oil and Gas Industry
Pressure
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Sound Spectrography
Time Factors
Transducers, Pressure
Vocalization, Animal
Water
Abstract
Masking from industrial noise can hamper the ability to detect marine mammal sounds near industrial operations, whenever conventional (pressure sensor) hydrophones are used for passive acoustic monitoring. Using data collected from an autonomous recorder with directional capabilities (Directional Autonomous Seafloor Acoustic Recorder), deployed 4.1?km from an arctic drilling site in 2012, the authors demonstrate how conventional beamforming on an acoustic vector sensor can be used to suppress noise arriving from a narrow sector of geographic azimuths. Improvements in signal-to-noise ratio of up to 15?dB are demonstrated on bowhead whale calls, which were otherwise undetectable using conventional hydrophones.
PubMed ID
27106345 View in PubMed
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Acoustic vector sensor beamforming reduces masking from underwater industrial noise during passive monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289559
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2016
Author
Aaron M Thode
Katherine H Kim
Robert G Norman
Susanna B Blackwell
Charles R Greene
Author Affiliation
Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, California 92093-0205, USA athode@ucsd.edu.
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Date
04-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acoustics - instrumentation
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - instrumentation - methods
Equipment Design
Models, Theoretical
Motion
Noise - adverse effects
Oceans and Seas
Oil and Gas Industry
Pressure
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Sound Spectrography
Time Factors
Transducers, Pressure
Vocalization, Animal
Water
Abstract
Masking from industrial noise can hamper the ability to detect marine mammal sounds near industrial operations, whenever conventional (pressure sensor) hydrophones are used for passive acoustic monitoring. Using data collected from an autonomous recorder with directional capabilities (Directional Autonomous Seafloor Acoustic Recorder), deployed 4.1?km from an arctic drilling site in 2012, the authors demonstrate how conventional beamforming on an acoustic vector sensor can be used to suppress noise arriving from a narrow sector of geographic azimuths. Improvements in signal-to-noise ratio of up to 15?dB are demonstrated on bowhead whale calls, which were otherwise undetectable using conventional hydrophones.
PubMed ID
27106345 View in PubMed
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Acute effects on heart rate variability when exposed to hand transmitted vibration and noise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163243
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2007 Nov;81(2):193-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Bodil Björ
Lage Burström
Marcus Karlsson
Tohr Nilsson
Ulf Näslund
Urban Wiklund
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational Medicine, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden. bodil.bjor@envmed.umu.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2007 Nov;81(2):193-9
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Electrocardiography
Female
Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome - physiopathology
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Monitoring, Physiologic
Noise - adverse effects
Sweden
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
This study investigates possible acute effects on heart rate variability (HRV) when people are exposed to hand transmitted vibration and noise individually and simultaneously.
Ten male and 10 female subjects were recruited by advertisement. Subjects completed a questionnaire concerning their work environment, general health, medication, hearing, and physical activity level. The test started with the subject resting for 15 min while sitting down. After resting, they were exposed to one of four exposure conditions: (1) only vibration; (2) only noise; (3) both noise and vibration; or (4) a control condition of exposure to the static load only. All four exposures lasted 15 min and the resting time between the exposures was 30 min. A continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) signal was recorded and the following HRV parameters were calculated: total spectral power (P(TOT)); the spectral power of the very low frequency component (P(VLF)); the low frequency component (P(LF)); the high frequency component (P(HF)); and the ratio LF/HF.
Exposure to only vibration resulted in a lower P(TOT) compared to static load, whereas exposure to only noise resulted in a higher P(TOT). The mean values of P(TOT), P(VLF), P(LF), and P(HF) were lowest during exposure to vibration and simultaneous exposure to vibration and noise.
Exposure to vibration and/or noise acutely affects HRV compared to standing without these exposures. Being exposed to vibration only and being exposed to noise only seem to generate opposite effects. Compared to no exposure, P(TOT) was reduced during vibration exposure and increased during noise exposure.
PubMed ID
17541625 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of the HINT (hearing in noise test) for adult Canadian Francophone populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173487
Source
Int J Audiol. 2005 Jun;44(6):358-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Véronique Vaillancourt
Chantal Laroche
Chantal Mayer
Cynthia Basque
Madeleine Nali
Alice Eriks-Brophy
Sigfrid D Soli
Christian Giguère
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Room 1117, Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Program, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Rd., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K 1H 8M5. vaillancourt@mail.health.uottawa.ca
Source
Int J Audiol. 2005 Jun;44(6):358-69
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Female
Hearing Tests
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Noise - adverse effects
Phonetics
Reproducibility of Results
Speech Intelligibility
Speech Perception - physiology
Speech Reception Threshold Test
Abstract
The HINT provides an efficient and reliable method of assessing speech intelligibility in quiet and in noise by using an adaptive strategy to measure speech reception thresholds for sentences, thus avoiding ceiling and floor effects that plague traditional measures performed at fixed presentation levels A strong need for such a test within the Canadian Francophone population, led us to develop a French version of the HINT. Here we describe the development of this test. The Canadian French version is composed of 240-recorded sentences, equated for intelligibility, and cast into 12 phonemically balanced 20-sentence lists. Average headphone SRTs, measured with 36 adult Canadian Francophone native speakers with normal hearing, were 16.4 dBA in quiet, -3.0 dBA SNR in a 65 dBA noise front condition and -11.4 dBA SNR in a 65 dBA noise side condition. Reliability was established by means of within-subjects standard deviation of repeated SRT measurements over different lists and yielded values of 2.2 and 1.1 dB for the quiet and noise conditions, respectively.
PubMed ID
16078731 View in PubMed
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Adverse health effects among women living with heavy snorers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72163
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2000 Mar;21(2):81-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J. Ulfberg
N. Carter
M. Talbäck
C. Edling
Author Affiliation
Sleep Disorders Center, Avesta Hospital, Sweden. jan.ulfberg@ltdalarna.se
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2000 Mar;21(2):81-90
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Family Health
Fatigue - etiology - psychology
Female
Headache - etiology - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Noise - adverse effects
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sleep Disorders - etiology - psychology
Sleep Stages
Snoring - physiopathology
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
Women living with heavy snorers were more frequently affected by symptoms of insomnia, morning headache, daytime sleepiness, and fatigue than women living with non-snorers. Questionnaire data were collected from 1,032 women 30 to 64 years of age residing in Dalarna county, in mid-Sweden. There were indications of a "dose-response relationship" between the conjectured sound exposure and reported symptoms, regardless of whether the female herself snored. Sleeping in separate bedrooms did not seem to give the women any alleviation. The results point to a possible contributory cause of disturbed sleep, morning headache, and daytime sleepiness among women living with a snoring spouse. The results also indicate that prevention and treatment of snoring are important issues for the couple as well as for the snorer.
PubMed ID
10818830 View in PubMed
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Adverse health effects of industrial wind turbines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113884
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 May;59(5):473-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Roy D Jeffery
Carmen Krogh
Brett Horner
Author Affiliation
Northeastern Manitoulin Family Health Team, Box 549, Little Current, ON P0P 1K0, Canada. jeffery_07@sympatico.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 May;59(5):473-5
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Family Practice
Humans
Noise - adverse effects
Power Plants - statistics & numerical data
Public Health
Wind
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 2012;344:e152722403264
Cites: J Acoust Soc Am. 2009 Aug;126(2):634-4319640029
Cites: J Acoust Soc Am. 2011 Jun;129(6):3727-4421682397
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2007 Jul;64(7):480-617332136
Cites: Noise Health. 2012 Sep-Oct;14(60):237-4323117539
Cites: Noise Health. 2005 Apr-Jun;7(27):39-4716105248
Cites: Noise Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;13(54):333-921959113
PubMed ID
23673580 View in PubMed
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Amplitude modulation of sound from wind turbines under various meteorological conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264950
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Jan;135(1):67-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Conny Larsson
Olof Öhlund
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Jan;135(1):67-73
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics
Atmospheric Pressure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humidity
Motion
Noise - adverse effects
Power Plants
Renewable Energy
Sound Spectrography
Sweden
Temperature
Time Factors
Wind
Abstract
Wind turbine (WT) sound annoys some people even though the sound levels are relatively low. This could be because of the amplitude modulated "swishing" characteristic of the turbine sound, which is not taken into account by standard procedures for measuring average sound levels. Studies of sound immission from WTs were conducted continually between 19 August 2011 and 19 August 2012 at two sites in Sweden. A method for quantifying the degree and strength of amplitude modulation (AM) is introduced here. The method reveals that AM at the immission points occur under specific meteorological conditions. For WT sound immission, the wind direction and sound speed gradient are crucial for the occurrence of AM. Interference between two or more WTs could probably enhance AM. The mechanisms by which WT sound is amplitude modulated are not fully understood.
PubMed ID
24437746 View in PubMed
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163 records – page 1 of 17.