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Aircraft noise annoyance and average versus maximum noise levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223180
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1992 Sep-Oct;47(5):326-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Björkman
U. Ahrlin
R. Rylander
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1992 Sep-Oct;47(5):326-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aircraft
Humans
Middle Aged
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
A questionnaire study was performed in seven areas located around the airports of Landvetter and Save, Gothenburg, in an attempt to elucidate the extent of annoyance in populations exposed to aircraft noise. Noise exposure was estimated as the energy equivalent level (Aircraft Noise Level--FBN) or as the number of aircraft with levels that exceeded 70 dBA, combined with the maximum noise level. The results were compared with data obtained from the earlier Scandinavian Aircraft Noise Investigation. The results supported the conclusion that the annoyance reaction is better related to the number of aircraft and the maximum noise level than to energy equivalent levels for noise exposure.
PubMed ID
1444593 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aircraft noise annoyance in recreational areas after changes in noise exposure: comments on Krog and Engdahl (2004).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172319
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2005 Sep;118(3 Pt 1):1265-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Ronny Klaeboe
Author Affiliation
Institute of Transport Economics, Oslo, Norway. rk@toi.no
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2005 Sep;118(3 Pt 1):1265-7
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Norway
Quality of Life
Recreation
Regression Analysis
Abstract
When Gardermoen replaced Fornebu as the main airport for Oslo, aircraft noise levels increased in recreational areas near Gardermoen and decreased in areas near Fornebu. Krog and Engdahl [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 323-333 (2004)] estimate that recreationists' annoyance from aircraft noise in these areas changed more than would be anticipated from the actual noise changes. However, the sizes of their estimated "situation" effects are not credible. One possible reason for the anomalous results is that standard regression assumptions become violated when motivational factors are inserted into the regression model. Standardized regression coefficients (beta values) should also not be utilized for comparisons across equations.
Notes
Comment On: J Acoust Soc Am. 2004 Jul;116(1):323-3315295993
PubMed ID
16240785 View in PubMed
Less detail

Air traffic noise and hypertension in Stockholm County.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192549
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2001 Dec;58(12):761
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
S. Pattenden
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2001 Dec;58(12):761
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Confidence Intervals
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - etiology
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Occup Environ Med. 2001 Dec;58(12):769-7311706142
PubMed ID
11706140 View in PubMed
Less detail

Annoyance and disturbance of daily activities from road traffic noise in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158995
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2008 Feb;123(2):784-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
David S Michaud
Stephen E Keith
Dale McMurchy
Author Affiliation
Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. dmichaud@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2008 Feb;123(2):784-92
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude
Canada - epidemiology
Dyssomnias - etiology - psychology
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Loudness Perception
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Vehicles
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Psychoacoustics
Questionnaires
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This study evaluated road traffic noise annoyance in Canada in relation to activity interference, subject concerns about noise and self-reported distance to a major road. Random digit dialing was employed to survey a representative sample of 2565 Canadians 15 years of age and older. Respondents highly annoyed by traffic noise were significantly more likely to perceive annoyance to negatively impact health, live closer to a heavily traveled road and report that traffic noise often interfered with daily activities. Sex, age, education level, community size and province had statistically significant associations with traffic noise annoyance. High noise annoyance consistently correlated with frequent interference of activities. Reducing noise at night (10 pm-7 am) was more important than during the rest of the day.
PubMed ID
18247883 View in PubMed
Less detail

Annoyance, sleep and concentration problems due to combined traffic noise and the benefit of quiet side.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272613
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Feb;12(2):1612-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Theo Bodin
Jonas Björk
Jonas Ardö
Maria Albin
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Feb;12(2):1612-28
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anger
Attention
Female
Geographic Information Systems
Health Surveys
Housing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects - prevention & control
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sleep
Sweden
Abstract
Access to a quiet side in one's dwelling is thought to compensate for higher noise levels at the most exposed façade. It has also been indicated that noise from combined traffic sources causes more noise annoyance than equal average levels from either road traffic or railway noise separately.
2612 persons in Malmö, Sweden, answered to a residential environment survey including questions on outdoor environment, noise sensitivity, noise annoyance, sleep quality and concentration problems. Road traffic and railway noise was modeled using Geographic Information System.
Access to a quiet side, i.e., at least one window facing yard, water or green space, was associated with reduced risk of annoyance OR (95%CI) 0.47 (0.38-0.59), and concentration problems 0.76 (0.61-0.95). Bedroom window facing the same environment was associated to reduced risk of reporting of poor sleep quality 0.78 (0.64-1.00). Railway noise was associated with reduced risk of annoyance below 55 dB(A) but not at higher levels of exposure.
Having a window facing a yard, water or green space was associated to a substantially reduced risk of noise annoyance and concentration problems. If this window was the bedroom window, sleeping problems were less likely.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25642690 View in PubMed
Less detail

Annoyance with aircraft noise in local recreational areas, contingent on changes in exposure and other context variables.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178931
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2004 Jul;116(1):323-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Norun Hjertager Krog
Bo Engdahl
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Environmental Medicine, P.O. Box 4404 Nydalen, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway. norun.krog@fhi.no
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2004 Jul;116(1):323-33
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aircraft
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Norway
Quality of Life
Recreation - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
Few socioacoustic studies have examined the effect of noise on outdoor recreationists. The areas studied have been mountain and wilderness areas that people typically travel for a distance to visit. In this article we examine the reactions to aircraft noise in local recreational areas experiencing either decreased (1930 survey respondents), or increased noise exposure (1001 survey respondents). Field studies were conducted before and after the relocation the main airport of Norway in 1998 in one area near each airport. The relationship between individual noise exposure (LAeq for the aircraft events, percentage of time aircraft were audible, and LAsel) for the aircraft events. The analyses included the "situation" in which data were collected (before or after the relocation), and variables describing the recreational context. A strong effect of the "situation" was found in both cases, but the size of the effect was influenced by the choice of exposure variable in one of the study areas. Other context variables were also influencing annoyance. The effect of the situation (before/after a change in exposure) on the dose-response relationship may be influenced by the initial noise levels, the amount of change, and the time elapsed since the change at the time of the second survey. Further research should investigate the significance of these variables.
Notes
Comment In: J Acoust Soc Am. 2005 Sep;118(3 Pt 1):1265-716240785
PubMed ID
15295993 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Assessment of a risk from aviation noise exposure to the population's health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146283
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Sep-Oct;(5):29-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Fokin
S M Novikov
M S Bespalov
A Iu Reteium
E Iu Oseledets
L V Prokopenko
Iu P Pal'tsev
T M Uspenskaia
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Sep-Oct;(5):29-31
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - prevention & control
Guidelines as Topic
Health status
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Incidence
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The paper gives an algorithm, a procedure for calculation of aircraft noise, and its spread modeling. The performed investigations have provided guidelines that will become the first Russian official guiding document for assessing a risk from aviation noise to human health.
PubMed ID
20050061 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between nighttime traffic noise and sleep: the Finnish public sector study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121869
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):1391-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Jaana I Halonen
Jussi Vahtera
Stephen Stansfeld
Tarja Yli-Tuomi
Paula Salo
Jaana Pentti
Mika Kivimäki
Timo Lanki
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. jaana.halonen@ttl.fi
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):1391-6
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cities - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Sleep
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Associations between traffic noise and sleep problems have been detected in experimental studies, but population-level evidence is scarce.
We studied the relationship between the levels of nighttime traffic noise and sleep disturbances and identified vulnerable population groups.
Noise levels of nighttime-outdoor traffic were modeled based on the traffic intensities in the cities of Helsinki and Vantaa, Finland. In these cities, 7,019 public sector employees (81% women) responded to postal surveys on sleep and health. We linked modeled outdoor noise levels to the residences of the employees who responded to the postal survey. We used logistic regression models to estimate associations of noise levels with subjectively assessed duration of sleep and symptoms of insomnia (i.e., difficulties falling asleep, waking up frequently during the night, waking up too early in the morning, nonrestorative sleep). We also used stratified models to investigate the possibility of vulnerable subgroups.
For the total study population, exposure to levels of nighttime-outside (L(night, outside)) traffic noise > 55 dB was associated with any insomnia symptom = 2 nights per week [odds ratio (OR) = 1.32; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05, 1.65]. Among participants with higher trait anxiety scores, which we hypothesized were a proxy for noise sensitivity, the ORs for any insomnia symptom at exposures to L(night, outside) traffic noises 50.1-55 dB and > 55 dB versus = 45 dB were 1.34 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.80) and 1.61 (95% CI: 1.07, 2.42), respectively.
Nighttime traffic noise levels > 50 dB L(night, outside) was associated with insomnia symptoms among persons with higher scores for trait anxiety. For the total study population, L(night, outside) > 55 dB was positively associated with any symptoms.
Notes
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Erratum In: Environ Health Perspect. 2013 May;121(5):A147
PubMed ID
22871637 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise: research in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101718
Source
Noise Health. 2011 May-Jun;13(52):212-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gösta Bluhm
Charlotta Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Nobels väg 13, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. gosta.bluhm@ki.se
Source
Noise Health. 2011 May-Jun;13(52):212-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Automobiles
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
City Planning
Humans
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Public Policy
Railroads
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In Sweden, as in many other European countries, traffic noise is an important environmental health issue. At present, almost two million people are exposed to average noise levels exceeding the outdoor national guideline value (55 dB(A)). Despite efforts to reduce the noise burden, noise-related health effects, such as annoyance and sleep disturbances, are increasing. The scientific interest regarding more serious health effects related to the cardiovascular system is growing, and several experimental and epidemiological studies have been performed or are ongoing. Most of the studies on cardiovascular outcomes have been related to noise from road or aircraft traffic. Few studies have included railway noise. The outcomes under study include morning saliva cortisol, treatment for hypertension, self-reported hypertension, and myocardial infarction. The Swedish studies on road traffic noise support the hypothesis of an association between long-term noise exposure and cardiovascular disease. However, the magnitude of effect varies between the studies and has been shown to depend on factors such as sex, number of years at residence, and noise annoyance. Two national studies have been performed on the cardiovascular effects of aircraft noise exposure. The first one, a cross-sectional study assessing self-reported hypertension, has shown a 30% risk increase per 5 dB(A) noise increase. The second one, which to our knowledge is the first longitudinal study assessing the cumulative incidence of hypertension, found a relative risk (RR) of 1.10 (95% CI 1.01 - 1.19) per 5 dB(A) noise increase. No associations have been found between railway noise and cardiovascular diseases. The findings regarding noise-related health effects and their economic consequences should be taken into account in future noise abatement policies and community planning.
PubMed ID
21537104 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Conceptual model for assessment and management of human risk from transport pollution].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132179
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 May-Jun;(3):20-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
K B Fridman
T E Lim
S N Shustalov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 May-Jun;(3):20-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Incidence
Models, Theoretical
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Transportation
Abstract
The existing methodology for human health risk assessment allows one to appreciably study cause-and-effect relationships between environmental factors and human health. Risk management is a logic continuation of the assessment of human health risk and it is aimed at substantiating the choice of decisions that are best in a specific situation to eliminate or minimize it, to make follow-up monitoring of exposures and a risk, to evaluate the efficiency of health-improving measures and to correct the latter. Risk management involves technical, technological, organizational, social, legal, economic, normative, political, and other decisions made on the conclusions and estimates obtained when characterizing the risk.
PubMed ID
21842731 View in PubMed
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71 records – page 1 of 8.