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169 records – page 1 of 17.

24-hour noise dose and risk assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186267
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2003 Apr;18(4):232-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003

[Achievements and prospects in railway transport hygiene].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210051
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1997;(5):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
V A Kaptsov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1997;(5):14-8
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Microclimate
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Railroads
Risk factors
Russia
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
A unique Institute of Railway Hygiene was created 70 years ago in Russia, one of the major railway countries in the world. Since then the Institute's staffers have carried out huge work on improvement of railway workers' health, prevention of their exposure to noise, unfavorable microclimate, vibration and other occupational hazards. Significant contribution into the world occupational hygiene was made by such Institute's professionals as S.F. Kazansky, P.I. Nikitin, A.M. Volkov and others.
PubMed ID
9235211 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A comparison of hearing losses in the workers of a shipyard and in loggers in relation to individual risk factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103534
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1990;(10):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
J. Pekkarinen
J. Starck
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1990;(10):15-8
Date
1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ear Protective Devices
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Risk factors
Ships
Wood
Abstract
It is suggested that, within the same energy level, an impulse noise is more hazardous to hearing than a permanent noise. To justify this hypothesis, a study was performed with groups of wood-cutters and shipyard workers to investigate different characteristics of noise load (noise levels, noise impulsivity from the outside and under the ear-flaps, noise emission levels with regard to the length of work and using ear-flaps), and hearing losses (both real and forecasted on the Robinson model). To avoid individual factors, a computerized assessment of 38 pairs of workers from both teams was performed (with regard to similar noise emission levels, diastolic pressures, smoking habits, their military service backgrounds as to the service in heavy artillery units, absence of otic diseases, low consumption of salicylates). The results showed that, within the same energy level, the noise in the shipyard was three times as impulsive and more otic disorders inducing than the noise in the wood-cutters' working conditions.
PubMed ID
2276660 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acoustics and psychosocial environment in intensive coronary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70774
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Mar;62(3):e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
V. Blomkvist
C A Eriksen
T. Theorell
R. Ulrich
G. Rasmanis
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Stockholm, Sweden. vanja.blomkvist@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Mar;62(3):e1
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics
Adult
Aged
Coronary Care Units
Female
Health Services Research
Hospital Design and Construction
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Occupational Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Principal Component Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Speech Intelligibility
Stress, Psychological - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Stress, strain, and fatigue at the workplace have previously not been studied in relation to acoustic conditions. AIMS: To examine the influence of different acoustic conditions on the work environment and the staff in a coronary critical care unit (CCU). METHOD: Psychosocial work environment data from start and end of each individual shift were obtained from three shifts (morning, afternoon, and night) for a one-week baseline period and for two four-week periods during which either sound reflecting or sound absorbing tiles were installed. RESULTS: Reverberation times and speech intelligibility improved during the study period when the ceiling tiles were changed from sound reflecting tiles to sound absorbing ones of identical appearance. Improved acoustics positively affected the work environment; the afternoon shift staff experienced significantly lower work demands and reported less pressure and strain. CONCLUSIONS: Important gains in the psychosocial work environment of healthcare can be achieved by improving room acoustics. The study points to the importance of further research on possible effects of acoustics in healthcare on staff turnover, quality of patient care, and medical errors.
PubMed ID
15723873 View in PubMed
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Ambient and at-the-ear occupational noise exposure and serum lipid levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284204
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016 Oct;89(7):1087-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Mai C Arlien-Søborg
Astrid S Schmedes
Z A Stokholm
M B Grynderup
J P Bonde
C S Jensen
Å M Hansen
T W Frederiksen
J. Kristiansen
K L Christensen
J M Vestergaard
S P Lund
H A Kolstad
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016 Oct;89(7):1087-93
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Humans
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Manufacturing Industry
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Occupational and residential noise exposure has been related to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Alteration of serum lipid levels has been proposed as a possible causal pathway. The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between ambient and at-the-ear occupational noise exposure and serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglycerides when accounting for well-established predictors of lipid levels.
This cross-sectional study included 424 industrial workers and 84 financial workers to obtain contrast in noise exposure levels. They provided a serum sample and wore portable dosimeters that every 5-s recorded ambient noise exposure levels during a 24-h period. We extracted measurements obtained during work and calculated the full-shift mean ambient noise level. For 331 workers who kept a diary on the use of a hearing protection device (HPD), we subtracted 10 dB from every noise recording obtained during HPD use and estimated the mean full-shift noise exposure level at the ear.
Mean ambient noise level was 79.9 dB (A) [range 55.0-98.9] and the mean estimated level at the ear 77.8 dB (A) [range 55.0-94.2]. Ambient and at-the-ear noise levels were strongly associated with increasing levels of triglycerides, cholesterol-HDL ratio, and decreasing levels of HDL-cholesterol, but only in unadjusted analyses that did not account for HPD use and other risk factors.
No associations between ambient or at-the-ear occupational noise exposure and serum lipid levels were observed. This indicates that a causal pathway between occupational and residential noise exposure and cardiovascular disease does not include alteration of lipid levels.
PubMed ID
27319006 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of audiological examinations of railroad mechanics].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240901
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1984 Feb;(2):48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1984

[Analysis of changes in characteristics of arterial hypertension occupational risk in workers of nonferrous metallurgy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268147
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2015;(8):10-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
E M Vlasova
D M Shliapnikov
T M Lebedeva
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2015;(8):10-3
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Metallurgy
Models, Theoretical
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Occupational Health - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Risk assessment
Russia
Workplace - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The article covers changes in occupational cardiovascular risk for workers of nonferrous,metallurgy. Findings are that exposure to noise up to 94 dB with length of service increases possible atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. With 5 years of service, risk of the predicted conditions increases by 40.5%. When occupational exposure lasts over 5 years, risk of arterial hypertension increases. A group of workers without exposure to occupational factors appeared to have no connection between length of service and metabolic syndrome and arterial hypertension. Risk evolution modelling proved that risk of functional disorders in nonferrous metallurgy workers becomes unacceptable after 5 years of service (cardiovascular disorders are critical).
PubMed ID
26596109 View in PubMed
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An approach to the development of hearing standards for hearing-critical jobs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181513
Source
Noise Health. 2003 Oct-Dec;6(21):17-37
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Laroche
S. Soli
C. Giguère
J. Lagacé
V. Vaillancourt
M. Fortin
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Program, Ontario, Canada. claroche@uottawa.ca
Source
Noise Health. 2003 Oct-Dec;6(21):17-37
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Fisheries
Hearing Loss - diagnosis - etiology
Humans
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Psychometrics
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Speech Perception - classification
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
Many jobs at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) have several features in common: they are often performed in noisy environments and involve a number of auditory skills and abilities, such as speech communication, sound localization, and sound detection. If an individual lacks these skills and abilities, it may constitute a safety risk for this individual, as well as for fellow workers and the general public. A number of scientific models have been developed to predict performance on these auditory skills based on diagnostic measures of hearing such as pure-tone audiograms. While these models have significant scientific and research value, they are unable to provide accurate predictions of real life performance on auditory skills necessary to perform hearing-critical jobs. An alternative and more accurate approach has been developed in this research project. A direct measure of functional speech perception in noise (Hearing in Noise Test: HINT) has been identified and validated for use in screening applicants for hearing-critical jobs in DFO. This screening tool has adequate and well-defined psychometric properties (e.g. reliability, sensitivity, and validity) so that screening test results can be used to predict an individual's ability to perform critical auditory skills in noisy environments, with a known degree of prediction error. Important issues must be considered when setting screening criteria. First, the concept of hearing-critical tasks must be reviewed, since these tasks are often performed in high noise levels where normally-hearing people cannot hear adequately. Second, noise-induced hearing loss is frequent in these noisy environments, and workers who acquire a hearing loss might not continue to meet the minimal auditory screening criteria throughout their career. Other senses (e.g., vision, touch) also play an important role in these environments. Third, adaptation strategies have to be considered when recruits or incumbents fail the screening test.
PubMed ID
14965451 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological perspective of the causes of hearing loss among industrial workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103238
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1990 Feb;19(1):31-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
R. Phaneuf
R. Hétu
Author Affiliation
Département de santé communautaire de Lanaudière, Joliette, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1990 Feb;19(1):31-40
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ear Diseases - complications
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Noise - adverse effects
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
An etiologic paradigm of hearing loss for industrial workers is introduced as having two major components, one being occupational and the other extra-occupational. The extra-occupational factors include age, noise exposure outside the work place, trauma, ear disease and ototoxic drugs. The work-related factors include occupational noise, whole body vibration, work-related diseases and toxic exposures. Within this framework, a review of the epidemiology of hearing loss examines the possible relationships between hearing loss and these factors.
PubMed ID
2179575 View in PubMed
Less detail

An investigation of noise levels in Alberta sawmills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186942
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Feb;43(2):156-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Niels Koehncke
Maurice Taylor
Chris Taylor
Lloyd Harman
Patrick A Hessel
Paul Beaulne
Tee Guidotti
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada. niels.koehncke@usask.ca
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Feb;43(2):156-64
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Ear Protective Devices
Humans
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - prevention & control
Seasons
Wood
Abstract
Noise exposure in the sawmill industry is an area of concern. This study documents the level of noise exposure in nine sawmills in the province of Alberta, Canada.
Personal noise monitoring data were collected in nine Alberta sawmills, in winter and in summer (n = 213). Exposures were considered in light of an estimated "real world" noise reduction rating (NRR) calculation assuming use of conventional hearing protection. Limited comparisons were made with spot area monitoring data.
Only 10% of the personal monitoring measurements were below the Alberta 8-hr exposure limit of 85 dBA. Twenty-seven percent of the personal monitoring measurements were 95 dBA or higher. Worker enclosures played a large role in reducing noise exposure. There were no significant differences between seasons in noise category distributions (P = 0.61). The planermen and planer infeed operators had the highest percentage of personal monitoring measurements 95 dBA or higher (62% and 82%, respectively).
Based on a conservative formula, a risk of excess noise exposure could exist even when wearing required hearing protection due to very high noise levels found in planing operations in sawmills.
PubMed ID
12541270 View in PubMed
Less detail

169 records – page 1 of 17.