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Accelerated recovery of ischemic canine myocardium induced by AMP. Preliminary report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55698
Source
Adv Myocardiol. 1985;6:483-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
H M Sami
J R Koke
N. Bittar
Source
Adv Myocardiol. 1985;6:483-90
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenosine Diphosphate - metabolism
Adenosine Monophosphate - metabolism - pharmacology
Adenosine Triphosphate - metabolism
Animals
Coronary Disease - drug therapy
Creatine - metabolism
Dogs
Energy Metabolism - drug effects
Female
Male
Myocardial Contraction - drug effects
Nitroprusside - pharmacology
Phosphocreatine - metabolism
Abstract
Experiments were conducted on 18 dogs using an in situ blood-perfused canine heart model. Intracoronary infusion of AMP resulted in increased ATP and total adenine nucleotide levels. On reperfusion following a 15-min period of ischemia, ATP and total adenine nucleotide levels were significantly higher than control. Most important, contractile function recovered more rapidly in the AMP-treated dogs. It is therefore concluded that the delayed functional recovery noted after periods of ischemia is likely to be a direct result of delayed ATP resynthesis.
PubMed ID
3992046 View in PubMed
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Consomic strategies to localize genomic regions related to vascular reactivity in the Dahl salt-sensitive rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83403
Source
Physiol Genomics. 2006 Aug 16;26(3):218-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-16-2006
Author
Kunert Mary Pat
Drenjancevic-Peric Ines
Dwinell Melinda R
Lombard Julian H
Cowley Allen W
Greene Andrew S
Kwitek Anne E
Jacob Howard J
Author Affiliation
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, College of Nursing, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211, USA. mpkunert@uwm.edu
Source
Physiol Genomics. 2006 Aug 16;26(3):218-25
Date
Aug-16-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetylcholine - pharmacology
Animals
Aorta - drug effects - metabolism - physiology
Blood Pressure - drug effects - genetics - physiology
Blood Vessels - drug effects - metabolism - physiology
Chromosome Mapping - methods
Chromosomes, Mammalian - genetics
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Male
Nitroprusside - pharmacology
Oxygen - pharmacology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Dahl
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - administration & dosage
Vasoconstriction - drug effects
Abstract
Chromosomal substitution strains afford the opportunity to discover regions of the rat genome that contain genes related to cardiovascular traits with the long-range goal of linking these genes to physiological function. PhysGen (Programs for Genomic Applications) created a consomic panel of rats derived from the introgression of a single chromosome (> or =95% of the BN chromosome, one at a time) of the Brown Norway (BN/NHsdMcwi) rat onto the homogeneous genetic background of the Dahl salt-sensitive rat (SS/JrHsdMcwi). For 3 wk before the experiment, the rats were maintained on a low-salt diet (0.4% NaCl). The dose response of aortic rings from each strain of rat to phenylephrine, acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, and three different levels of tissue bath hypoxia (10, 5, and 0% O2) was measured and compared with the parental SS rat. To maximize the possibility that differences among the strains would become apparent, each strain of rat including the parental SS and BN was also studied after being maintained on a high-salt diet (4.0% NaCl) for 3 wk. If the response of the aortic ring from a consomic strain to these vasoactive substances was different from that of the SS parental strain, it was concluded that the introgressed chromosome contained a gene or genes that contributed to that difference. Because the BN chromosome is removed from its native background and the SS rat loses a native chromosome, it is also necessary to consider the contribution of changes in gene-to-gene interaction.
PubMed ID
16772359 View in PubMed
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[Effect of nitric oxide donors on myocardial contractile activity]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10245
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2001;47(1):34-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
T S Lagodych
Author Affiliation
A. A. Bogomoletz National Medical University, Kiev.
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2001;47(1):34-8
Date
2001
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Coronary Circulation - drug effects
English Abstract
Guanylate Cyclase - metabolism
Guinea Pigs
In Vitro
Myocardial Contraction - drug effects - physiology
Nitric Oxide - physiology
Nitric Oxide Donors - pharmacology
Nitroglycerin - pharmacology
Nitroprusside - pharmacology
Perfusion
Vasodilator Agents - pharmacology
Abstract
On the isolated guinea--pig heart perfused under Langendorff preparation influence of the NO was studied. Donators of NO were nitroglycerinum and sodium nitroprusside. The myocardium contractive activity indeces and the coronary flow were studied before and after introduction of the guanilatcyclase blockade by methylene blue. The received results show that after introduction of nitroglycerinum and sodium nitroprusside myocardium contractive activity indeces decrease, and the coronary flow increases. After introduction of methylene blue myocardium contractive activity indeces almost do not change--that confirms the guanilatcyclase mechanism of NO effect.
PubMed ID
11296554 View in PubMed
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Effect of nitro derivatives on electromechanical coupling in ureteral smooth muscle cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10385
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2000 May;129(5):455-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
I V Kovalev
A G Popov
A A Panov
Y L Borodin
L V Kapilevich
Y D Anfinogenova
M B Baskakov
M A Medvedev
Author Affiliation
Department of Biophysics, Siberian Medical University, Tomsk.
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2000 May;129(5):455-7
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Female
Guinea Pigs
Muscle Contraction - drug effects - physiology
Muscle, Smooth - physiology
Nitroglycerin - pharmacology
Nitroprusside - pharmacology
Uterus - physiology
Vasodilator Agents - pharmacology
Abstract
Double sucrose gap experiments revealed differences in the effect of nitroglycerin and sodium nitroprusside on action potential and contraction of ureteral smooth muscle cells. Unlike sodium nitroprusside, nitroglycerin inhibited voltage-dependent Ca(2+) membrane permeability. It was concluded that cGMP-independent mechanisms of the effects of nitro derivative reflect the peculiarities of excitation-contraction coupling in smooth muscles.
PubMed ID
10977949 View in PubMed
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Endothelium-dependent vasodilation, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome in an elderly cohort: the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87459
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2008 Feb;196(2):795-802
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Lind Lars
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. lars.lind@medsci.uu.se
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2008 Feb;196(2):795-802
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetylcholine - pharmacology
Aged
Blood Flow Velocity - drug effects
Brachial Artery - ultrasonography
Cohort Studies
Diagnostic Techniques, Cardiovascular
Endothelium, Vascular - physiopathology
Female
Forearm - blood supply
Humans
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - physiopathology
Nitroprusside - pharmacology
Plethysmography - methods
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Vasodilation - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Only a few previous studies have investigated endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the metabolic syndrome (MetS). In the Prospective Study of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study, different techniques to assess vasodilation in conduit and resistance arteries were evaluated in relation to the MetS and insulin resistance. METHODS: In this population-based study, 1016 subjects aged 70 were evaluated by the invasive forearm technique with acetylcholine (EDV), brachial artery ultrasound to assess flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) and pulse wave analysis with a beta-2 receptor agonist challenge, terbutaline. RESULTS: EDV was lower in subjects with the MetS (NECP/ATP III-criteria, prevalence 23%) compared to those without (p
PubMed ID
17335830 View in PubMed
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Hypothalamic monoamines in cold stress on the background of changes in the activity of the nitric oxide system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9262
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2005 Feb;35(2):171-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
M A Gilinskii
G M Petrakova
T G Amstislavskaya
L N Maslova
V V Bulygina
Author Affiliation
State Science Research Institute of Physiology, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 4 Timakov Street, 630117 Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2005 Feb;35(2):171-5
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic Acid - metabolism
Animals
Biogenic Monoamines - metabolism
Body Temperature - drug effects
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid - methods
Cold - adverse effects
Comparative Study
Corticosterone - blood
Dopamine - metabolism
Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology
Hypothalamus - drug effects - metabolism
Male
Nitric Oxide - physiology
Nitric Oxide Donors - pharmacology
Nitroarginine - pharmacology
Nitroprusside - pharmacology
Norepinephrine - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Radioimmunoassay - methods
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Stress - metabolism
Time Factors
Abstract
The effects of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside and the NO synthase blocker L-omega-N-nitroarginine (LNA) on body temperature, hypothalamic monoamines, and plasma corticosterone in conditions of cooling were studied in Male Wistar rats. Reductions in body temperature on cooling, both after administration of sodium nitroprusside and LNA, were no different from those seen without treatment. The basal corticosterone level after treatment with sodium nitroprusside increased from 5.3 +/- 2.2 to 29.1 +/- 1.8 microg%. Cooling led to a multiple increase in corticosterone levels in all animals, both in control conditions and after treatment with sodium nitroprusside and LNA. Sodium nitroprusside significantly decreased the basal hypothalamic noradrenaline level, by 37%. Cooling of the animals in these conditions led to an additional drop in the noradrenaline level. Noradrenaline levels 48 h after cold stress applied to animals cooled after treatment with LNA or sodium nitroprusside were significantly higher than in those cooled without treatment. No changes in serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels were seen in these experiments. The basal dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and dopamine levels increased after treatment with sodium nitroprusside, by 379% and 239% respectively. No dopamine response to cold was observed, though the dihydroxyphenylacetic acid level in the control group and animals treated with LNA increased. Thus, cold stress did not reveal differently directed directions for the actions of the NO donor and the NO synthase blocker, as seen with other types of stress.
PubMed ID
15779330 View in PubMed
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[Mechanism of nitric oxide's effect on the sensitivity of smooth muscle contractions to calcium]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10082
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2001;47(5):41-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
O Ia Andrukhov
V F Sahach
Author Affiliation
A.A. Bogomoletz Institute Physiology, Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kiev.
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2001;47(5):41-6
Date
2001
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Calcium - pharmacology
Contractile Proteins - chemistry - physiology
Dithiothreitol - pharmacology
English Abstract
Muscle Contraction - drug effects
Muscle, Smooth, Vascular - drug effects - physiology
Nitric Oxide - pharmacology
Nitric Oxide Donors - pharmacology
Nitroprusside - pharmacology
Portal Vein - drug effects
Rats
Sulfhydryl Compounds - chemistry
Abstract
It was investigated whether the SH-groups of contractile proteins are involved in NO-induced relaxation of saponin-skinned smooth muscle strips. Both, the thiol-specific alkylating agent N-ethylmaleamide (NEM), and thiol-reducing agent dithiotreitol (DTT) induced relaxation of maximally activated skinned rat portal vein preparations. The relaxing effects of DTT and nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside were not additive. After the relaxation, induced by one of this agent, the effect of the other one was negligible. We suggest that NO-induced smooth muscle relaxation be due to decreasing of force sensitivity to Ca2+. This effect of nitric oxide is realized by its interaction with critical thiol groups of smooth muscle contractile proteins.
PubMed ID
11758467 View in PubMed
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[Mechanisms of NO-dependent relaxation in smooth muscles of the rat aorta with nitro compounds]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10146
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 2001 May-Jun;64(3):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
I V Kovalev
A G Popov
A A Panov
Iu L Borodin
Ia D Afinogenova
L V Kapilevich
M B Baskakov
M A Medvedev
Author Affiliation
Department of Biophysics, Department of Normal Physiology, Siberian Medical University, Moskovskii trakt 2, Tomsk, 634050 Russia.
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 2001 May-Jun;64(3):33-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Aorta - drug effects - physiology
Calcium - physiology
Cyclic GMP - physiology
English Abstract
Homeostasis
In Vitro
Male
Membrane Potentials
Muscle Relaxation
Muscle Tonus
Muscle, Smooth, Vascular - drug effects - physiology
Nitric Oxide - physiology
Nitro Compounds - pharmacology
Nitroglycerin - pharmacology
Nitroprusside - pharmacology
Rats
Vasodilator Agents - pharmacology
Abstract
The membrane potential and smooth muscle tension in rat aorta were studied by the method of sucrose gap junction. It was found that sodium nitroprusside and nitroglycerin produced a dose-dependent membrane repolarization and smooth muscle cell relaxation in rat aorta preliminarily contracted and depolarized by hyperpotassium (40 mM) or phenylephrine solutions. The relaxation effect of sodium nitroprusside was more pronounced on the phenylephrine background. The effect of nitroglycerin showed a different kinetics in time and led to the tolerance development. The effects of both nitro compounds were inhibited by pretreatment with Methylene Blue or potassium channel blockers. It is suggested that nitro vasodilators are involved in the NO-dependent processes in smooth muscle cells of aorta through cGMP-mediated activation of the potassium conductivity and by changing the efficiency of operation of the protein kinase C branch of the Ca2+ signal system.
PubMed ID
11558436 View in PubMed
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[Myogenic effects of cyclic guanosine monophosphate in smooth muscle cells. Role of protein kinase C]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9635
Source
Ross Fiziol Zh Im I M Sechenova. 2003 Apr;89(4):436-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
I V Kovalev
M B Baskakov
M A Medvedev
Iu L Borodin
A A Popov
I L Minochenko
Ia D Anfinogenova
L V Kapilevich
Author Affiliation
Medical University of Siberia, 2 Moscow Tract, 634050, Tomsk, Russia.
Source
Ross Fiziol Zh Im I M Sechenova. 2003 Apr;89(4):436-46
Date
Apr-2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Action Potentials - drug effects - physiology
Animals
Colon - drug effects - enzymology - physiology
Cyclic GMP - physiology
Electric Stimulation
English Abstract
Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology
Guinea Pigs
In Vitro
Muscle Contraction - drug effects - physiology
Muscle, Smooth - drug effects - enzymology - physiology
Nitroglycerin - pharmacology
Nitroprusside - pharmacology
Protein Kinase C - antagonists & inhibitors - physiology
Ureter - drug effects - enzymology - physiology
Abstract
Heterogeneity of the cGMP-dependent contractility effects of the smooth cells (SMC) was shown in guinea pig ureter by the methods of the double sucrose gap junction. Sodium nitroprusside (SN, 0.1-100 microM) relaxed the high-K+ depolarisationprecontracted SMC but strengthened the SMC constriction triggered by electrical stimulation. In taenia coli, SN or nitroglycerin in the same concentration ranges depressed the electrical or mechanical activity of the SMC and relaxed the SMC, precontracted by depolarization in high-K+ medium. The inhibitor of the phosphodiesterases vinpocetine (1 microM) contributed to the activating effect of SN; the inhibitor of the soluble guanilatcyclase Methilen Blue (10 microM) depressed it. Histamine and mesotone (1-10 microM) increased the action potential and constriction of the SMC triggered by electrical stimulation but decreased the effect of SN. The activator of the protein kinase C (PK-C) phorbol miristoyl-13-acetyl (0.5 microM) changed direction of the SN effects inhibiting both the parameters of an action potential and of the SMC constriction. The pre-treatment with the inhibitor of PK-C calphostin C (0.1 microM) additionally depressed the effects of SN, increasing SMC constriction, especially in the presence of histamine and mesatone. We suggest that c-GMP depressed activity of the PK-C by independent mechanisms operating in SMC.
PubMed ID
12966721 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sex-specific differences in chromosome-dependent regulation of vascular reactivity in female consomic rat strains from a SSxBN cross.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93104
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2008 Aug;295(2):R516-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kunert Mary Pat
Dwinell Melinda R
Drenjancevic Peric Ines
Lombard Julian H
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211, USA. mpkunert@uwm.edu
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2008 Aug;295(2):R516-27
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetylcholine - pharmacology
Animals
Aorta - drug effects
Cell Hypoxia
Chromosomes, Mammalian
Crosses, Genetic
Female
Genotype
Male
Nitroprusside - pharmacology
Phenotype
Phenylephrine - pharmacology
Quantitative Trait Loci
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Dahl
Sex Factors
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - administration & dosage
Vasoconstriction - drug effects - genetics
Vasoconstrictor Agents - pharmacology
Vasodilation - drug effects - genetics
Vasodilator Agents - pharmacology
Abstract
High-throughput studies in the Medical College of Wisconsin Program for Genomic Applications (Physgen) were designed to link chromosomes with physiological function in consomic strains derived from a cross between Dahl salt-sensitive SS/JrHsdMcwi (SS) and Brown Norway normotensive BN/NHsdMcwi (BN) rats. The specific goal of the vascular protocol was to characterize the responses of aortic rings from these strains to vasoconstrictor and vasodilator stimuli (phenylephrine, acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, and bath hypoxia) to identify chromosomes that either increase or decrease vascular reactivity to these vasoactive stimuli. Because previous studies demonstrated sex-specific quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to regulation of cardiovascular phenotypes in an F2 cross between the parental strains, males and females of each consomic strain were included in all experiments. As there were significant sex-specific differences in aortic sensitivity to vasoconstrictor and vasodilator stimuli compared with the parental SS strain, we report the results of the females separately from the males. There were also sex-specific differences in aortic ring sensitivity to these vasoactive stimuli in consomic strains that were fed a high-salt diet (4% NaCl) for 3 wk to evaluate salt-induced changes in vascular reactivity. Differences in genetic architecture could contribute to sex-specific differences in the development and expression of cardiovascular diseases via differential regulation and expression of genes. Our findings are the first to link physiological traits with specific chromosomes in female SS rats and support the idea that sex is an important environmental variable that plays a role in the expression and regulation of genes.
PubMed ID
18509103 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.