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Acute respiratory symptoms in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in other subjects living near a coal-fired plant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240980
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1984 Jan-Feb;39(1):27-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
G. Pershagen
Z. Hrubec
U. Lorich
P. Rönnqvist
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1984 Jan-Feb;39(1):27-33
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Coal - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects - analysis
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - epidemiology
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Daily symptom rates in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in other subjects with presumed high sensitivity to air pollution who lived near a coal-fired plant were compared with 24-hr ambient air concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, soot, and suspended particles as well as with emissions from the plant. The mean concentrations of each of the pollutants during the 4-month study period were below 30 micrograms/m3, and no single 24-hr concentration exceeded 100 micrograms/m3. There were no consistent associations between plant emissions and pollutant levels or between these two variables and daily symptom rates. The results indicate that the coal-fired plant was not of major importance for the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms in the surrounding population.
PubMed ID
6712282 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and daily mortality in a city with low levels of pollution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187142
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jan;111(1):45-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Sverre Vedal
Michael Brauer
Richard White
John Petkau
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, Colorado, USA. vedals@njc.org
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jan;111(1):45-52
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - classification - poisoning
Air Pollution - adverse effects
British Columbia - epidemiology
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Carbon monoxide poisoning
Cardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Cause of Death
Databases as Topic
Humans
Linear Models
Meteorological Concepts
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - poisoning
Ozone - analysis - poisoning
Particle Size
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Seasons
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis - poisoning
Urban health
Abstract
The concentration-response relationship between daily ambient inhalable particle (particulate matter less than or equal to 10 micro m; PM(10)) concentrations and daily mortality typically shows no evidence of a threshold concentration below which no relationship is observed. However, the power to assess a relationship at very low concentrations of PM(10) has been limited in studies to date. The concentrations of PM(10) and other air pollutants in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, from January 1994 through December 1996 were very low: the 50th and 90th percentiles of daily average PM(10) concentrations were 13 and 23 micro g/m(3), respectively, and 27 and 39 ppb, respectively, for 1-hr maximum ozone. Analyses of 3 years of daily pollution (PM(10), ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon monoxide) concentrations and mortality counts showed that the dominant associations were between ozone and total mortality and respiratory and cardiovascular mortality in the summer, and between nitrogen dioxide and total mortality in the winter, although some association with PM(10) may also have been present. We conclude that increases in low concentrations of air pollution are associated with increased daily mortality. These findings may support the notion that no threshold pollutant concentrations are present, but they also raise concern that these effects may not be effects of the measured pollutants themselves, but rather of some other factor(s) present in the air pollution-meteorology mix.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12515678 View in PubMed
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Air Pollution and Dispensed Medications for Asthma, and Possible Effect Modifiers Related to Mental Health and Socio-Economy: A Longitudinal Cohort Study of Swedish Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291426
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 11 16; 14(11):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-16-2017
Author
Anna Oudin
Lennart Bråbäck
Daniel Oudin Åström
Bertil Forsberg
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå, Sweden. anna.oudin@umu.se.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 11 16; 14(11):
Date
11-16-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - analysis
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental health
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Odds Ratio
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
It has been suggested that children that are exposed to a stressful environment at home have an increased susceptibility for air pollution-related asthma. The aim here was to investigate the association between air pollution exposure and asthma, and effect modification by mental health and by socio-economic status (as markers of a stressful environment). All individuals under 18 years of age in four Swedish counties during 2007 to 2010 (1.2 million people) were included. The outcome was defined as dispensing at least two asthma medications during follow up. We linked data on NO2 from an empirical land use regression to data from national registers on outcome and potential confounders. Data was analyzed with logistic regression. There was an odds ratio (OR) of 1.02 (95% Confidence Interval (CI: 1.01-1.03) for asthma associated with a 10 µg·m-3 increase in NO2. The association only seemed to be present in areas where NO2 was higher than 15 µg·m-3 with an OR of 1.09 (95% CI: 1.07-1.12), and the association seemed stronger in children with parents with a high education, OR = 1.05 (95% CI: 1.02-1.09) and OR = 1.04 (95% CI: 1.01-1.07) in children to mothers and father with a high education, respectively. The association did not seem to depend on medication history of psychiatric disorders. There was weak evidence for the association between air pollution and asthma to be stronger in neighborhoods with higher education levels. In conclusion, air pollution was associated with dispensed asthma medications, especially in areas with comparatively higher levels of air pollution, and in children to parents with high education. We did not observe support for our hypothesis that stressors linked to socio-economy or mental health problems would increase susceptibility to the effects of air pollution on the development of asthma.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29144419 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for ischemic heart disease in Montreal, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162394
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(2):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Research Section, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(2):167-73
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Carbon Monoxide - analysis - toxicity
Cluster analysis
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
We examined the associations between emergency department (ED) visits for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and short-term elevations in ambient air pollutants (CO and NO(2)).
A hierarchical clusters design was used to study ED visits (n = 4979) for ischemic heart disease (ICD-9: 410-414) that occurred at a Montreal hospital between 1997 and 2002. The generalized linear mixed models technique was applied to create Poisson models for the clustered counts of ED visits for IHD. The analysis was done by gender for two age categories, all patients and patients aged over 64 years.
The results are presented as an excess risk increase associated with the interquartile range (IQR) of daily average of the pollutant concentration. The results for NO(2) (IQR = 9.5 ppb) were 5.9% (95% CI: 2.1-9.9) for all patients and 6.2% (95% CI: 1.2-11.4) for males; for patients aged over 64: 7.1% (95% CI: 2.5-11.9) for all patients, 9.1% (95% CI: 2.8-15.7) for males, and 6.5% (95% CI: 0.7-12.7) for females (for exposure lagged by 1-day). The results for CO (IQR = 0.2 ppm): 5.4% (95% CI: 2.3-8.5) for all patients, and 7.5% (95% CI: 3.6-11.6) for males. For patients aged over 64 years, 4.9% (95% CI: 1.3-8.7) for all patients, and 7.5% (95% CI: 2.6-12.6) for males. The results show the associations for the same day exposures.
The short-term effects of nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide are associated significantly with daily ED visits for ischemic heart disease. For NO(2) the associations are stronger for patients aged over 64 years. As indicated by our results, it is likely that vehicular traffic, a producer of NO(2) and CO, contributes to an increased number of ED visits for IHD.
PubMed ID
17638683 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for otitis media: a case-crossover study in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141881
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Nov;118(11):1631-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Roger Zemek
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Brian H Rowe
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario and University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Nov;118(11):1631-6
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Alberta
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Child, Preschool
Cross-Over Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Infant
Inhalation Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Odds Ratio
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Ozone - analysis
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - analysis
Risk factors
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Weather
Abstract
Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common early childhood infections, resulting in an enormous economic burden to the health care system through unscheduled doctor visits and antibiotic prescriptions.
The objective of this study was to investigate the potential association between ambient air pollution exposure and emergency department (ED) visits for OM.
Ten years of ED data were obtained from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and linked to levels of air pollution: carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter (PM) of median aerometric diameter
Notes
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PubMed ID
20663739 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and general practitioner access and utilization: a population based study in Sarnia, 'Chemical Valley,' Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132343
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Tor H Oiamo
Isaac N Luginaah
Dominic O Atari
Kevin M Gorey
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. thoiamo@uwo.ca
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:71
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Female
General Practitioners - utilization
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis - toxicity
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Ontario
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Urban Health Services - utilization
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis - toxicity
Young Adult
Abstract
Health impacts of poor environmental quality have been identified in studies around the world and in Canada. While many of the studies have identified associations between air pollution and mortality or morbidity, few have focused on the role of health care as a potential moderator of impacts. This study assessed the determinants of health care access and utilization in the context of ambient air pollution in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada.
Residents of Sarnia participated in a Community Health Study administered by phone, while several ambient air pollutants including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and the volatile organic compounds benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, mp- and o-xylene (BTEX) were monitored across the city. Land Use Regression models were used to estimate individual exposures to the measured pollutants and logistic regression models were utilized to assess the relative influence of environmental, socioeconomic and health related covariates on general practitioner access and utilization outcomes.
The results show that general practitioner use increased with levels of exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2- Odds Ratio [OR]: 1.16, p 0.05).
This study provides evidence for inequitable health care access and utilization in Sarnia, with particular relevance to its situation as a sentinel high exposure environment. Levels of exposure to pollution appears to influence utilization of health care services, but poor access to primary health care services additionally burden certain groups in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21827645 View in PubMed
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Alternate approaches for assessing impacts of oil sands development on air quality: A case study using the First Nation Community of Fort McKay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300093
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2018 04; 68(4):308-328
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Carla Davidson
David Spink
Author Affiliation
a Endeavour Scientific , Calgary , Alberta , Canada.
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2018 04; 68(4):308-328
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Air Pollutants - chemistry - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Alberta
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Hydrocarbons - analysis
Indians, North American
Nitric Oxide - analysis
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Nitrogen Oxides - analysis
Oil and Gas Fields
Ozone - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Abstract
Previous analyses of continuously measured compounds in Fort McKay, an indigenous community in the Athabasca Oil Sands, have detected increasing concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and total hydrocarbons (THC), but not of sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), total reduced sulfur compounds (TRS), or particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter
PubMed ID
28945508 View in PubMed
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Ambient air levels and the exposure of children to benzene, toluene, and xylenes in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34102
Source
Environ Res. 1997 Nov;75(2):149-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
C. Lohse
B L Thomsen
H. Skov
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Division for Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Environ Res. 1997 Nov;75(2):149-59
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - analysis - toxicity
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Benzene - analysis - toxicity
Child
Denmark
Environmental Exposure
Environmental health
Female
Humans
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Health
Toluene - analysis - toxicity
Urban health
Xylenes - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
The aims of the study were to evaluate if the front-door concentrations of benzene, toluene, and xylenes can be used to classify the personal exposures of Danish children and to identify factors that affect their personal exposure. Average concentrations were measured over 1 week with diffusive samplers, and the personal exposures of 98 children and the concentrations outside the front doors of their homes were measured simultaneously. Time and activity patterns were noted in diaries. The front-door concentrations were significantly higher in Copenhagen than in rural areas (all P
PubMed ID
9417846 View in PubMed
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Ambient air pollution exposures and risk of rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Swedish EIRA case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122271
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2013 Jun;72(6):888-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jaime E Hart
Henrik Källberg
Francine Laden
Tom Bellander
Karen H Costenbader
Marie Holmqvist
Lars Klareskog
Lars Alfredsson
Elizabeth W Karlson
Author Affiliation
Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. Jaime.hart@channing.harvard.edu
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2013 Jun;72(6):888-94
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Educational Status
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Odds Ratio
Particulate Matter - analysis
Risk factors
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Environmental factors may play a role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We examined whether long-term exposures to air pollution were associated with the risk of RA in the Swedish Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis Study.
We studied 1497 incident RA cases and 2536 controls. Local levels of particulate matter (PM10) and gaseous pollutants (sulphur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2)) from traffic and home heating were predicted for all residential addresses. We examined the association of an IQR increase (2 µg/m3 for PM10, 8 µg/m3 for SO2 and 9 µg/m3 for NO2) in each pollutant at different time points before symptom onset and average exposure with the risk of all RA and the risk of the rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) RA phenotypes.
There was no evidence of an increased risk of RA with PM10. Total RA risks were modestly elevated for the gaseous pollutants, but were not statistically significant after adjustment for smoking and education (OR 1.18, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.43 and OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.19 for SO2 and NO2 in the 10th year before onset). Stronger elevated risks were observed for individuals with less than a university education and with the ACPA-negative RA phenotype.
No consistent overall associations between air pollution in the Stockholm area and the risk of RA were observed. However, there was a suggestion of increased risks of RA incidence with increases in NO2 from local traffic and SO2 from home heating sources with stronger associations for the ACPA-negative phenotype.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22833374 View in PubMed
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Ambient air pollution triggers wheezing symptoms in infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93640
Source
Thorax. 2008 Aug;63(8):710-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Andersen Z J
Loft S.
Ketzel M.
Stage M.
Scheike T.
Hermansen M N
Bisgaard H.
Author Affiliation
Department of Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen University, Øster Farimagsgade 5 Entr. B, P O Box 2099, 1014 Copenhagen K, Denmark. zorana@cancer.dk
Source
Thorax. 2008 Aug;63(8):710-6
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - genetics
Carbon Monoxide - toxicity
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Infant
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Nitrogen Oxides - analysis - toxicity
Particulate Matter - analysis - toxicity
Pedigree
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Time Factors
Vehicle Emissions - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is limited evidence for the role of air pollution in the development and triggering of wheezing symptoms in young children. A study was undertaken to examine the effect of exposure to air pollution on wheezing symptoms in children under the age of 3 years with genetic susceptibility to asthma. METHODS: Daily recordings of symptoms were obtained for 205 children participating in the birth cohort study Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Children and living in Copenhagen for the first 3 years of life. Daily air pollution levels for particulate matter
PubMed ID
18267985 View in PubMed
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