Skip header and navigation

Refine By

27 records – page 1 of 3.

An evaluation of reactive filter media for treating landfill leachate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83135
Source
Chemosphere. 2005 Nov;61(7):933-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Kietlinska A.
Renman G.
Author Affiliation
Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology-KTH, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden. agak@kth.se
Source
Chemosphere. 2005 Nov;61(7):933-40
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adsorption
Filtration
Industrial Waste
Metals - chemistry - isolation & purification
Nitrogen - chemistry - isolation & purification
Oxides - chemistry
Refuse Disposal
Silicon Dioxide - chemistry
Soil
Water Pollutants, Chemical - isolation & purification
Water Purification - methods
Abstract
A laboratory bench-scale column study was conducted to evaluate permeable reactive filter materials as a new method for removal of heavy metals and inorganic nitrogen from landfill leachate. Mixtures of sand and peat, blast-furnace slag (BFS) and peat, and Polonite and peat were tested by loading columns with leachate collected from a pond at Tvetaverket Landfill, Sweden. Sand, peat and Polonite represent natural materials. BFS is a by-product from steel-works. The metal treatment efficiencies of the media were assessed and Polonite was found to perform best, where Mn, Fe, Zn and Cu concentrations were removed by 99%, 93%, 86% and 67%, respectively. This material was also able to reduce inorganic N by 18%. The BFS showed good removal efficiency for Cu (66%), Zn (62%), Ni (19%) and Mo (16%). The sand-peat mixture did not demonstrate a promising removal capacity for any of the elements studied with the exception of Cu (25%). The removal of different elements was suggested to be a combination of several factors, i.e. precipitation, ion exchange and adsorption. Prior to full-scale application of reactive filters at a landfill site, matrix selection, filter design and operational procedures must be developed.
PubMed ID
16257316 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bacterial community composition and diversity of five different permafrost-affected soils of Northeast Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257936
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):426-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Lars Ganzert
Felizitas Bajerski
Dirk Wagner
Author Affiliation
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, Germany.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):426-41
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acidobacteria - genetics - growth & development
Bacteroidetes - genetics - growth & development
Biodiversity
Carbon - chemistry
Greenland
Heterotrophic Processes
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Ice
Molecular Sequence Data
Molecular Typing
Nitrogen - chemistry
Phylogeny
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Proteobacteria - genetics - growth & development
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Soil - chemistry
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
Greenland is one of the regions of interest with respect to climate change and global warming in the Northern Hemisphere. Little is known about the structure and diversity of the terrestrial bacterial communities in ice-free areas in northern Greenland. These soils are generally poorly developed and usually carbon- and nitrogen-limited. Our goal was to provide the first insights into the soil bacterial communities from five different sites in Northeast Greenland using culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. The comparison of environmental and biological data showed that the soil bacterial communities are diverse and significantly pH-dependent. The most frequently detected OTUs belonged to the phyla Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes and (Alpha-, Beta-, Delta-) Proteobacteria. Low pH together with higher nitrogen and carbon concentrations seemed to support the occurrence of (Alpha-, Beta-, Delta-) Proteobacteria (at the expense of Acidobacteria), whereas Bacteroidetes were predominant at higher values of soil pH. Our study indicates that pH is the main factor for shaping bacterial community, but carbon and nitrogen concentrations as well may become important, especially for selecting oligotrophic microorganisms.
PubMed ID
24819653 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bacterial community structure and soil properties of a subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257928
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):465-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Hye Min Kim
Ji Young Jung
Etienne Yergeau
Chung Yeon Hwang
Larry Hinzman
Sungjin Nam
Soon Gyu Hong
Ok-Sun Kim
Jongsik Chun
Yoo Kyung Lee
Author Affiliation
Korea Polar Research Institute, KIOST, Incheon, Korea; School of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):465-75
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacteria - genetics
Alaska
Biomass
Carbon - chemistry
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Molecular Sequence Data
Molecular Typing
Nitrogen - chemistry
Phylogeny
Proteobacteria - genetics
RNA, Bacterial - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Soil - chemistry
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
The subarctic region is highly responsive and vulnerable to climate change. Understanding the structure of subarctic soil microbial communities is essential for predicting the response of the subarctic soil environment to climate change. To determine the composition of the bacterial community and its relationship with soil properties, we investigated the bacterial community structure and properties of surface soil from the moist acidic tussock tundra in Council, Alaska. We collected 70 soil samples with 25-m intervals between sampling points from 0-10 cm to 10-20 cm depths. The bacterial community was analyzed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and the following soil properties were analyzed: soil moisture content (MC), pH, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-). The community compositions of the two different depths showed that Alphaproteobacteria decreased with soil depth. Among the soil properties measured, soil pH was the most significant factor correlating with bacterial community in both upper and lower-layer soils. Bacterial community similarity based on jackknifed unweighted unifrac distance showed greater similarity across horizontal layers than through the vertical depth. This study showed that soil depth and pH were the most important soil properties determining bacterial community structure of the subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.
Notes
Cites: Nature. 2011 Dec 15;480(7377):368-7122056985
Cites: ISME J. 2012 Jan;6(1):94-10321716311
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2006 Mar;72(3):1719-2816517615
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Jan 17;103(3):626-3116407148
Cites: Science. 2005 Oct 28;310(5748):657-6016179434
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2011 Aug;13(8):2299-31421554513
Cites: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2012 Mar;62(Pt 3):716-2122140171
Cites: ISME J. 2012 May;6(5):1007-1722134642
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2012 Nov;82(2):303-1522404643
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e5189723284808
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(9):e7644024086740
Cites: PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e8476124416279
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Feb;87(2):403-1524117982
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2006 Jul 1;34(Web Server issue):W394-916845035
Cites: BMC Bioinformatics. 2006;7:37116893466
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2007 Feb;59(2):428-3517313585
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2007 Feb;59(2):513-2317313587
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2007 Feb;59(2):452-6517328122
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2007 Aug;73(16):5261-717586664
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2008 Mar;74(5):1620-3318192411
Cites: ISME J. 2008 Aug;2(8):805-1418615117
Cites: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2008 Sep;58(Pt 9):2215-2318768632
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2009 Feb;67(2):208-1819049494
Cites: ISME J. 2009 Apr;3(4):442-5319129864
Cites: Nature. 2009 May 28;459(7246):556-919478781
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2009 Aug;75(15):5111-2019502440
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2004 Oct 1;50(1):13-2319712373
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2010 Jan 15;26(2):266-719914921
Cites: Microb Ecol. 2010 Feb;59(2):335-4319705192
Cites: PLoS One. 2010;5(3):e949020224823
Cites: Extremophiles. 2010 Mar;14(2):205-1220066448
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2010 Mar;19 Suppl 1:54-6620331770
Cites: Nat Methods. 2010 May;7(5):335-620383131
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2010 May;12(5):1132-4320132284
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2010 Jul;12(7):1842-5420236166
Cites: ISME J. 2010 Sep;4(9):1206-1420393573
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2010 Oct 1;26(19):2460-120709691
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2010 Oct;76(20):6751-920729324
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2010 Nov;12(11):2998-300620561020
Cites: BMC Bioinformatics. 2011;12:3821276213
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 May 10;108(19):7850-421518859
Cites: Microbiology. 2011 Jun;157(Pt 6):1551-6421511765
Cites: Microbiology. 1997 Dec;143 ( Pt 12):3913-99421915
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2005 Oct;71(10):5710-816204479
PubMed ID
24893754 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biogeochemical probing of microbial communities in a basalt-hosted hot spring at Kverkfjöll volcano, Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296592
Source
Geobiology. 2018 09; 16(5):507-521
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
09-2018
Author
Claire R Cousins
Marilyn Fogel
Roxane Bowden
Ian Crawford
Adrian Boyce
Charles Cockell
Matthew Gunn
Author Affiliation
School of Earth and Environmental Science, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, UK.
Source
Geobiology. 2018 09; 16(5):507-521
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Archaea - genetics
Bacteria - genetics
Carbon - chemistry
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Geologic Sediments - microbiology
Hot Springs - microbiology
Iceland
Nitrogen - chemistry
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Silicates - chemistry
Abstract
We investigated bacterial and archaeal communities along an ice-fed surficial hot spring at Kverkfjöll volcano-a partially ice-covered basaltic volcano at Vatnajökull glacier, Iceland, using biomolecular (16S rRNA, apsA, mcrA, amoA, nifH genes) and stable isotope techniques. The hot spring environment is characterized by high temperatures and low dissolved oxygen concentrations at the source (68°C and
PubMed ID
29856116 View in PubMed
Less detail

Complexation of zinc in organic soils--EXAFS evidence for sulfur associations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78952
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2007 Jan 1;41(1):119-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2007
Author
Karlsson Torbjörn
Skyllberg Ulf
Author Affiliation
Department of Forest Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2007 Jan 1;41(1):119-24
Date
Jan-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Complex Mixtures - chemistry
Models, Chemical
Nitrogen - chemistry
Norway
Oxygen - chemistry
Soil - analysis
Spectrum Analysis - methods
Sulfur Compounds - chemistry
Zinc - chemistry
Abstract
Even if it is generally accepted that associations with natural organic matter (NOM) to a great extent determine the bioavailability and mobility of trace metals in soils and waters, the knowledge about the identity of NOM functional groups involved is still limited. In this study, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was used to determine the coordination chemistry of zinc (Zn) in two organic soils (500-10,000 microg Zn g(-), pH 5.6-7.3). In both soils Zn was coordinated by a mixture of oxygen/nitrogen (O/N) and sulfur (S) ligands in the first coordination shell. In average, 0.4-0.9 S atoms were located at a distance of 2.29-2.33 angstom, well in agreement with a 4-fold coordination with thiolates (RS-) in proteins. In addition 2.7-3.7 O/N atoms were located at 1.99-2.04 angstrom. The improved merit of fit by inclusion of S atoms was shown to be significant after adjusting for the improvement caused merely by increasing the number of fitting parameters. Two second shell Zn-C distances were used in our model: 3.0-4.2 carbon (C) atoms, associated to first shell O/N, were encountered at an average distance of 2.84 amgstrom, and 0.4-0.9 C atoms, associated to first shell S, were encountered at an average distance of 3.32 angstrom. These Zn-C distances are well in agreement with distances determined in well-defined organic molecules. It is concluded that Zn forms mainly inner-sphere complexes with a mixture of 4-fold coordination with S and O/N ligands and 6-fold coordination with O ligands in organic soils.
PubMed ID
17265936 View in PubMed
Less detail

Continuous summer export of nitrogen-rich organic matter from the Greenland Ice Sheet inferred by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264617
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Dec 16;48(24):14248-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-2014
Author
Emily C Lawson
Maya P Bhatia
Jemma L Wadham
Elizabeth B Kujawinski
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Dec 16;48(24):14248-57
Date
Dec-16-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon
Climate change
Ecosystem
Fourier Analysis
Greenland
Ice Cover - chemistry
Mass Spectrometry - methods
Nitrogen - chemistry
Seasons
Time Factors
Abstract
Runoff from glaciers and ice sheets has been acknowledged as a potential source of bioavailable dissolved organic matter (DOM) to downstream ecosystems. This source may become increasingly significant as glacial melt rates increase in response to future climate change. Recent work has identified significant concentrations of bioavailable carbon and iron in Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) runoff. The flux characteristics and export of N-rich DOM are poorly understood. Here, we employed electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) to determine the elemental compositions of DOM molecules in supraglacial water and subglacial runoff from a large GrIS outlet glacier. We provide the first detailed temporal analysis of the molecular composition of DOM exported over a full melt season. We find that DOM pools in supraglacial and subglacial runoff are compositionally diverse and that N-rich material is continuously exported throughout the melt season, as the snowline retreats further inland. Identification of protein-like compounds and a high proportion of N-rich DOM, accounting for 27-41% of the DOM molecules identified by ESI FT-ICR MS, may suggest a microbial provenance and high bioavailability of glacially exported DOM to downstream microbial communities.
PubMed ID
25375225 View in PubMed
Less detail

Denitrification rate and carbon source consumption in full-scale wastewater filtration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9327
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2004;50(7):105-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
L. Jonsson
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Water Co, SE-106 36 Stockholm, Sweden. lena.jonsson@stockholmvatten.se
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2004;50(7):105-12
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetates - chemistry
Bioreactors
Carbon - chemistry
Ethanol - chemistry
Filtration - methods
Kinetics
Methanol - chemistry
Nitrates - chemistry
Nitrogen - chemistry
Oxygen - chemistry
Phosphorus - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sewage
Stainless Steel
Sweden
Time Factors
Waste Disposal, Fluid - economics - instrumentation - methods
Water Purification - economics - instrumentation - methods
Abstract
In response to new demands for increased removal of nitrogen and phosphorus, the Henriksdal and Bromma treatment plants, with hydraulic loads of 283,000 and 148,000 m3/d, respectively, built filtration steps as a final process step in the plants. The denitrification rates in a full-scale and in a pilot plant filter are calculated to 13.1 and 21.3 g (NO3+NO2)-N/(m3 x h), respectively, in the total filter bed after 2.5-24.2 and 16.0-28.0 h of operational time, and 6.4 and 18.7 g (NO3+NO2)-N/(m3 x h), respectively, after 1.0 and 0.1-0.9 h of operational time. In composite samples, the denitrification rate in the total filter bed is 10-20 g (NO3+NO2)-N/(m3 x h) in the full-scale filter. The average values for k = deltaCODf/deltaC(T) are 1.6 and around 3 in the total filter bed in steady state and in the beginning of the experiments, respectively, both in the full-scale and in the pilot plant study. The carbon source costs for reducing the concentration of nitrate nitrogen in the Bromma plant from 12 to 8 mg/l in the effluent are 117,400 EUR and 147,400 EUR with methanol and ethanol, respectively, as a carbon source.
PubMed ID
15553465 View in PubMed
Less detail

Disentangling effects of growth and nutritional status on seabird stable isotope ratios.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91430
Source
Oecologia. 2009 Feb;159(1):41-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Sears Justine
Hatch Scott A
O'Brien Diane M
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Wildlife, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA. ftjss1@uaf.edu
Source
Oecologia. 2009 Feb;159(1):41-8
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Animals
Carbon - chemistry - metabolism
Carbon Isotopes - chemistry - metabolism
Charadriiformes - growth & development - physiology
Erythrocytes - chemistry
Feathers - chemistry
Food Deprivation
Nitrogen - chemistry - metabolism
Nitrogen Isotopes - chemistry - metabolism
Nutritional Status - physiology
Abstract
A growing number of studies suggest that an individual's physiology affects its carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures, obscuring a signal often assumed to be only a reflection of diet and foraging location. We examined effects of growth and moderate food restriction on red blood cell (RBC) and feather delta(15)N and delta(13)C in rhinoceros auklet chicks (Cerorhinca monocerata), a piscivorous seabird. Chicks were reared in captivity and fed either control (75 g/day; n = 7) or ~40% restricted (40 g/day; n = 6) amounts of high quality forage fish. We quantified effects of growth on isotopic fractionation by comparing delta(15)N and delta(13)C in control chicks to those of captive, non-growing subadult auklets (n = 11) fed the same diet. To estimate natural levels of isotopic variation, we also collected blood from a random sample of free-living rhinoceros auklet adults and chicks in the Gulf of Alaska (n = 15 for each), as well as adult feather samples (n = 13). In the captive experiment, moderate food restriction caused significant depletion in delta(15)N of both RBCs and feathers in treatment chicks compared to control chicks. Growth also induced depletion in RBC delta(15)N, with chicks exhibiting lower delta(15)N when they were growing the fastest. As growth slowed, delta(15)N increased, resulting in an overall pattern of enrichment over the course of the nestling period. Combined effects of growth and restriction depleted delta(15)N in chick RBCs by 0.92 per thousand. We propose that increased nitrogen-use efficiency is responsible for (15)N depletion in both growing and food-restricted chicks. delta(15)N values in RBCs of free-ranging auklets fell within a range of only 1.03 per thousand, while feather delta(15)N varied widely. Together, our captive and field results suggest that both growth and moderate food restriction can affect stable isotope ratios in an ecologically meaningful way in RBCs although not feathers due to greater natural variability in this tissue.
PubMed ID
18975007 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Effect of sulfate-reducing bacteria on steel corrosion in the presence of inhibitors]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9768
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 2002 Nov-Dec;64(6):67-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
L M Purish
I S Pogrebova
I A Kozlova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Microbiology and Virology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 154 Zabolotny St., Kyiv, 03143, Ukraine.
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 2002 Nov-Dec;64(6):67-72
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benzoates - pharmacology
Corrosion
Desulfovibrio - metabolism
English Abstract
Nitrogen - chemistry
Oxygen - chemistry
Polyethylene Glycols - pharmacology
Steel - chemistry
Sulfates - metabolism
Sulfur - chemistry
Sulfur-Reducing Bacteria - drug effects - physiology
Surface-Active Agents - chemistry - pharmacology
Abstract
Steel 08KP corrosion was studied as affected by inhibitors in presence of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Organic compounds, containing functional groups with nitrogen, oxygen and sulphur atoms, were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. It is shown that the studied inhibitors may be divided into three groups as to the mechanism of protective action. It has been established that cation-active nitrogen-containing surfactants ([symbol: see text] X, [symbol: see text]-1, [symbol: see text]-1M, catapin M, [symbol: see text]-2M) are the most efficient steel corrosion inhibitors. Such inhibitors, when adsorbed on metal surface, can affect the process of hydrogen precipitation on its surface, and thus inhibit catalytic function of SRB as the depolarizer of cathode process.
PubMed ID
12664553 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of a gradually increased load of fish waste silage in co-digestion with cow manure on methane production.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260079
Source
Waste Manag. 2014 Aug;34(8):1553-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Linn Solli
Ove Bergersen
Roald Sørheim
Tormod Briseid
Source
Waste Manag. 2014 Aug;34(8):1553-9
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ammonia - chemistry
Anaerobiosis
Animals
Biodegradation, Environmental
Biofuels
Bioreactors
Cattle
Fatty Acids - chemistry
Fatty Acids, Volatile - chemistry
Fisheries
Fishes
Gases
Manure
Methane - chemistry
Nitrogen - chemistry
Norway
Refuse Disposal - methods
Silage
Abstract
This study examined the effects of an increased load of nitrogen-rich organic material on anaerobic digestion and methane production. Co-digestion of fish waste silage (FWS) and cow manure (CM) was studied in two parallel laboratory-scale (8L effective volume) semi-continuous stirred tank reactors (designated R1 and R2). A reactor fed with CM only (R0) was used as control. The reactors were operated in the mesophilic range (37°C) with a hydraulic retention time of 30 days, and the entire experiment lasted for 450 days. The rate of organic loading was raised by increasing the content of FWS in the feed stock. During the experiment, the amount (volume%) of FWS was increased stepwise in the following order: 3% - 6% - 13% - 16%, and 19%. Measurements of methane production, and analysis of volatile fatty acids, ammonium and pH in the effluents were carried out. The highest methane production from co-digestion of FWS and CM was 0.400 L CH4 gVS(-1), obtained during the period with loading of 16% FWS in R2. Compared to anaerobic digestion of CM only, the methane production was increased by 100% at most, when FWS was added to the feed stock. The biogas processes failed in R1 and R2 during the periods, with loadings of 16% and 19% FWS, respectively. In both reactors, the biogas processes failed due to overloading and accumulation of ammonia and volatile fatty acids.
PubMed ID
24820663 View in PubMed
Less detail

27 records – page 1 of 3.