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Abnormal cervical cytology is associated with increased nitric oxide release in the uterine cervix.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89757
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(4):417-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Rahkola Paivi
Mikkola Tomi S
Nieminen Pekka
Ylikorkala Olavi
Vaisanen-Tommiska Mervi
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(4):417-21
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Fluids - metabolism
Cervix Uteri - cytology - metabolism
Contraceptives, Oral - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Menstrual Cycle - physiology
Middle Aged
Nitric Oxide - analysis - metabolism
Papillomavirus Infections - metabolism - pathology
Postmenopause
Sweden
Uterine Cervical Dysplasia - metabolism - pathology - virology
Vaginal Smears
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The human uterine cervix is capable of producing nitric oxide (NO). We studied the impact of cytological changes on the release of cervical NO. DESIGN: Population-based case-control study. SETTING: City of Helsinki, Finland. POPULATION: Cervical cytology tests and cervical fluid samples were collected in 297 women. METHODS: Cervical cytology tests, classified according to Bethesda criteria, were specifically analyzed for changes typically seen in human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and the level of NO metabolites (NOx) in cervical fluid was assessed by Griess reaction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The difference in cervical fluid NOx between normal and abnormal cytology. RESULTS: Cervical cytology was normal in 219 women and abnormal in 78 women. Among women with abnormal cytology there was both a higher detection rate (89% vs. 71%) and a higher concentration of NOx (median 22.5 micromol/l, 95% CI 14.6-31.9 vs. 11.0 micromol/l, 95% CI 8.0-16.7) compared to women with normal cytology. Age, parity, use of oral contraceptives, phase of the menstrual cycle, or history of miscarriage or termination of early pregnancy were not linked to an increased cervical NOx level. CONCLUSIONS: Cervical cell changes (suggestive of HPV infection) are accompanied by an increased release of NO in the human cervix. The significance of this finding remains uncertain, but in theory, increased release of NO could modify the outcome of cervical infection.
PubMed ID
19266358 View in PubMed
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Source
Curr Opin Pediatr. 2002 Jun;14(3):298-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Niranjan Kissoon
Author Affiliation
University of Florida Health Sciences Center/Jacksonville, and Wolfson Children's Hospital, 32207-8210, USA. niranjan.kissoon@jax.ufl.edu
Source
Curr Opin Pediatr. 2002 Jun;14(3):298-302
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - physiopathology - prevention & control
Breath Tests
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Nitric Oxide - analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
The burden of asthma (death, disability, and an increasing prevalence) makes it a major public health problem worldwide. In an effort to decrease this burden, investigators are studying many aspects of this disease. The role of race, ethnicity, infections, and pollutants as triggers, as well as the risk factors are now being defined. Research into methods to decrease acute exacerbations and improve emergency and in-hospital management, using standardized protocols and incentives for follow-up care, has yielded valuable information but has met with limited success. Adherence to the national guidelines has been poor and to some extent can be attributed to the lack of a practical method of measuring the degree of lung inflammation and cumbersome treatment protocols. Exhaled nitric oxide is a noninvasive marker of inflammation and may provide a rational method to titrate corticosteroid and leukotriene receptor antagonist therapy. The best route and dosing regimen for corticosteroid administration (oral vs intramuscular vs nebulized) are the subject of several studies, with no clear-cut winner. The burden of asthma in developing countries with limited financial resources has also triggered a search for simpler, cheaper, and practical methods for beta-agonist delivery using indigenous spacers. Recent research in asthma has unveiled our incomplete knowledge of the disease but has also provided a sense of where efforts should be expended. Research into the genetics and pharmacogenetics of asthma and into the societal factors limiting the delivery of optimal care is likely to yield useful and practical information.
PubMed ID
12011668 View in PubMed
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Airway inflammation in probiotic-treated children at 5 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136906
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2011 Mar;22(2):249-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Anna K Kukkonen
Mikael Kuitunen
Erkki Savilahti
Anna Pelkonen
Pekka Malmberg
Mika Mäkelä
Author Affiliation
The Skin and Allergy Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. kaarina.kukkonen@hus.fi
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2011 Mar;22(2):249-51
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Nitric Oxide - analysis
Prebiotics
Prevalence
Probiotics - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
Early treatment of new-born high-risk children with certain probiotic strains has reduced the risk of atopic eczema. Whether probiotics reduce risk for airway inflammation in long term is not known. We aimed at studying the effect of probiotic treatment during the six first months of life on airway inflammation at age 5 yr. In a randomized double-blind allergy prevention trial between 2000 and 2007 in Helsinki, Finland, we gave a probiotic combination, plus pre-biotics, or placebo, to 1018 children during 6 months from birth. At age 5, we measured exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO) ) in a randomized sub-population of 160 children. Allergic diseases and IgE-sensitization were assessed in all infants. FE(NO) did not differ between probiotic and placebo groups, median (interquartile range, IQR) 5.45 (4.3-7.3) vs. 5.70 (3.9-6.8) ppb, p = 0.22. FE(NO) was elevated among those suffering from asthma during the first 5 yr than in healthy non-sensitized children (p = 0.009). FE(NO) correlated positively with serum total and allergen-specific IgE concentrations. Early intervention with probiotics and pre-biotics does not affect airway inflammation later in childhood.
PubMed ID
21332798 View in PubMed
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Alternate approaches for assessing impacts of oil sands development on air quality: A case study using the First Nation Community of Fort McKay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300093
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2018 04; 68(4):308-328
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Carla Davidson
David Spink
Author Affiliation
a Endeavour Scientific , Calgary , Alberta , Canada.
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2018 04; 68(4):308-328
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Air Pollutants - chemistry - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Alberta
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Hydrocarbons - analysis
Indians, North American
Nitric Oxide - analysis
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Nitrogen Oxides - analysis
Oil and Gas Fields
Ozone - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Abstract
Previous analyses of continuously measured compounds in Fort McKay, an indigenous community in the Athabasca Oil Sands, have detected increasing concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and total hydrocarbons (THC), but not of sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), total reduced sulfur compounds (TRS), or particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter
PubMed ID
28945508 View in PubMed
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Are asthma-like symptoms in elite athletes associated with classical features of asthma?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152734
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2009 Dec;43(14):1131-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
T K Lund
L. Pedersen
S D Anderson
A. Sverrild
V. Backer
Author Affiliation
Respiratory and Allergy Research Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. tclund@dadlnet.dk
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2009 Dec;43(14):1131-5
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Breath Tests
Bronchi - drug effects
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchodilator Agents - pharmacology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Male
Mannitol - pharmacology
Nitric Oxide - analysis
Sports - statistics & numerical data
Sputum - cytology
Vital Capacity - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Asthma is frequent in elite athletes and clinical studies in athletes have found increased airway inflammation.
To investigate asthma-like symptoms, airway inflammation, airway reactivity (AR) to mannitol and use of asthma medication in Danish elite athletes.
The study group consisted of 54 elite athletes (19 with doctor-diagnosed asthma), 22 non-athletes with doctor-diagnosed asthma (steroid naive for 4 weeks before the examination) and 35 non-athletes without asthma; all aged 18-35 years. Examinations (1 day): questionnaires, exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) in parts per billion, spirometry, skin prick test, AR to mannitol and blood samples. Induced sputum was done in subjects with asthma.
No significant difference was found in values for eNO, AR and atopy between 42 elite athletes with and 12 without asthma-like symptoms. Elite athletes with doctor-diagnosed asthma had less AR (response dose ratio 0.02 (0.004) vs 0.08 (0.018) p
PubMed ID
19201767 View in PubMed
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Are exhaled nitric oxide measurements using the portable NIOX MINO repeatable?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97218
Source
Respir Res. 2010;11:43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Anna Selby
Bernie Clayton
Jane Grundy
Katy Pike
Kirsty Drew
Abid Raza
Ramesh Kurukulaaratchy
S Hasan Arshad
Graham Roberts
Author Affiliation
School of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. acs404@soton.ac.uk
Source
Respir Res. 2010;11:43
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - diagnosis - drug therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
Breath Tests - instrumentation
Child
Clinical Trials as Topic
Cohort Studies
Equipment Design
Exhalation
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Nitric Oxide - analysis
Observer Variation
Predictive value of tests
Reproducibility of Results
Respiratory Function Tests
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Exhaled nitric oxide is a non-invasive marker of airway inflammation and a portable analyser, the NIOX MINO (Aerocrine AB, Solna, Sweden), is now available. This study aimed to assess the reproducibility of the NIOX MINO measurements across age, sex and lung function for both absolute and categorical exhaled nitric oxide values in two distinct groups of children and teenagers. METHODS: Paired exhaled nitric oxide readings were obtained from 494 teenagers, aged 16-18 years, enrolled in an unselected birth cohort and 65 young people, aged 6-17 years, with asthma enrolled in an interventional asthma management study. RESULTS: The birth cohort participants showed a high degree of variability between first and second exhaled nitric oxide readings (mean intra-participant difference 1.37 ppb, 95% limits of agreement -7.61 to 10.34 ppb), although there was very close agreement when values were categorised as low, normal, intermediate or high (kappa = 0.907, p
PubMed ID
20416092 View in PubMed
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Both allergic and nonallergic asthma are associated with increased FE(NO) levels, but only in never-smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90849
Source
Allergy. 2009 Jan;64(1):55-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Malinovschi A.
Janson C.
Högman M.
Rolla G.
Torén K.
Norbäck D.
Olin A-C
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Cell Biology: Integrative Physiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 2009 Jan;64(1):55-61
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Europe
Exhalation
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity
Inflammation
Male
Nitric Oxide - analysis
Respiratory Transport
Smoking
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Allergic asthma is consistently associated with increased FE(NO) levels whereas divergence exists regarding the use of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) as marker of inflammation in nonallergic asthma and in asthmatic smokers. The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of having allergic or nonallergic asthma on exhaled nitric oxide levels, with special regard to smoking history. METHODS: Exhaled NO measurements were performed in 695 subjects from Turin (Italy), Gothenburg and Uppsala (both Sweden). Current asthma was defined as self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma with at least one asthma symptom or attack recorded during the last year. Allergic status was defined by using measurements of specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). Smoking history was questionnaire-assessed. RESULTS: Allergic asthma was associated with 91 (60, 128) % [mean (95% CI)] increase of FE(NO) while no significant association was found for nonallergic asthma [6 (-17, 35) %] in univariate analysis, when compared to nonatopic healthy subjects. In a multivariate analysis for never-smokers, subjects with allergic asthma had 77 (27, 145) % higher FE(NO) levels than atopic healthy subjects while subjects with nonallergic asthma had 97 (46, 166) % higher FE(NO) levels than nonatopic healthy subjects. No significant asthma-related FE(NO) increases were noted for ex- and current smokers in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Both allergic and nonallergic asthma are related to increased FE(NO) levels, but only in never-smoking subjects. The limited value of FE(NO) to detect subjects with asthma among ex- and current smokers suggests the predominance of a noneosinophilic inflammatory phenotype of asthma among ever-smokers.
PubMed ID
19076545 View in PubMed
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Bronchial and peripheral airway nitric oxide in primary ciliary dyskinesia and bronchiectasis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99059
Source
Respir Med. 2009 May;103(5):700-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
A. Shoemark
R. Wilson
Author Affiliation
Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney Street, London, SW3 6NP, UK.
Source
Respir Med. 2009 May;103(5):700-6
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis
Breath Tests - methods
Bronchiectasis - etiology - metabolism - physiopathology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Kartagener Syndrome - complications - metabolism - physiopathology
London
Male
Middle Aged
Nitric Oxide - analysis
Sputum - microbiology
Abstract
Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic condition resulting in bronchiectasis. Exhaled gas nitric oxide (FE(NO)) is reduced in PCD. A model of pulmonary NO exchange dynamics can be used to demonstrate relative contributions of bronchial (J'aw(NO)) and peripheral airway (Calv(NO)) NO to the final FE(NO) concentration. The aim of this study was to compare bronchial and peripheral airway contribution to FE(NO) in patients with PCD, non-PCD bronchiectasis and healthy controls in order to establish the source of present FE(NO) in these conditions and to compare these with severity of disease. NO was measured at 50, 100, and 200 ml/s using an NO analyser (NiOx Sweden). J'aw(NO) and Calv(NO) were calculated according to a model of pulmonary exchange dynamics. PCD patients had reduced levels of J'aw(NO) compared to healthy controls whereas patients with non-PCD bronchiectasis had elevated J'aw(NO) levels. There was no difference in Calv(NO) between the three groups. In the disease groups Calv(NO) correlated negatively with FEV(1). In conclusion patients with PCD had significantly reduced FE(NO) at all expiratory flow rates. This was due to a significantly low bronchial NO. In contrast, peripheral airway NO was increased with more severe disease.
PubMed ID
19117740 View in PubMed
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[Changes of nitric oxide level at different stages of primary open-angle glaucoma]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50658
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2003 Sep-Oct;75(5):85-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
N M Gulaia
G D Zhaboedov
O V Petrenko
E I Kurilina
G V Kosiakova
A G Berdyshev
Author Affiliation
Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv.
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2003 Sep-Oct;75(5):85-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
English Abstract
Female
Glaucoma, Open-Angle - blood - metabolism - physiopathology
Humans
Intraocular Pressure - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrates - analysis - blood
Nitric Oxide - analysis - blood - metabolism
Tears - chemistry
Vision Tests
Abstract
The contents of NO stable metabolites in tears, and blood serum of the patients with different stages of open-angle glaucoma have been studied. The increasing of NO stable metabolite contents was found in tears, aqueous humor and blood serum during glaucoma progression. The depletion of glaucoma pathogenesis oxidative link was found at the terminal stage of the disease. The results of our investigation are proposed to be used for glaucoma diagnostic.
PubMed ID
14681997 View in PubMed
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Coarse Fraction Particle Matter and Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Non-Asthmatic Children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283704
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jun 22;13(6)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-22-2016
Author
Hanne Krage Carlsen
Peter Boman
Bodil Björ
Anna-Carin Olin
Bertil Forsberg
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jun 22;13(6)
Date
Jun-22-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Child
Exhalation - physiology
Female
Humans
Inflammation - etiology - physiopathology
Male
Models, Theoretical
Nitric Oxide - analysis
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Coarse particle matter, PMcoarse, is associated with increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between short-term changes in PMcoarse and sub-clininal airway inflammation in children. Healthy children aged 11 years from two northern Swedish elementary schools underwent fraction of exhaled nitrogen oxide (FENO) measurements to determine levels of airway inflammation twice weekly during the study period from 11 April-6 June 2011. Daily exposure to PMcoarse, PM2.5, NO2, NOx, NO and O3 and birch pollen was estimated. Multiple linear regression was used. Personal covariates were included as fixed effects and subjects were included as a random effect. In total, 95 children participated in the study, and in all 493 FENO measurements were made. The mean level of PMcoarse was 16.1 µg/m³ (range 4.1-42.3), and that of O3 was 75.0 µg/m³ (range: 51.3-106.3). That of NO2 was 17.0 µg/m³ (range: 4.7-31.3), NOx was 82.1 µg/m³ (range: 13.3-165.3), and NO was 65 µg/m³ (range: 8.7-138.4) during the study period. In multi-pollutant models an interquartile range increase in 24 h PMcoarse was associated with increases in FENO by between 6.9 ppb (95% confidence interval 0.0-14) and 7.3 ppb (95% confidence interval 0.4-14.9). PMcoarse was associated with an increase in FENO, indicating sub-clinical airway inflammation in healthy children.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27338437 View in PubMed
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46 records – page 1 of 5.