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118 records – page 1 of 12.

10-year prevalence of contact allergy in the general population in Denmark estimated through the CE-DUR method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161367
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2007 Oct;57(4):265-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Jacob Pontoppidan Thyssen
Wolfgang Uter
Axel Schnuch
Allan Linneberg
Jeanne Duus Johansen
Author Affiliation
National Allergy Research Centre, Department of Dermatology, Gentofte University Hospital, 1. 2820 Gentofte, Denmark. jacpth01@geh.regionh.dk
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2007 Oct;57(4):265-72
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allergens - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Balsams - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology
Drug Utilization Review
Humans
Nickel - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Patch Tests - utilization
Perfume - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Prevalence
Abstract
The prevalence of contact allergy in the general population has traditionally been investigated through population-based epidemiological studies. A different approach is the combination of clinical epidemiological (CE) data and the World Health Organization-defined drug utilization research (DUR) method. The CE-DUR method was applied in Denmark to estimate the prevalence of contact allergy in the general population and compare it with the prevalence estimates from the Glostrup allergy studies. Contact allergy prevalence estimates ranging from very liberal ('worst case') to conservative ('best case') assumptions were based on patch test reading data in combination with an estimate of the number of persons eligible for patch testing each year based on sales data of the 'standard series'. The estimated 10-year prevalence of contact allergy ranged between 7.3% and 12.9% for adult Danes older than 18 years. The 10-year prevalence of contact allergy measured by CE-DUR was slightly lower than previous prevalence estimates from the Glostrup allergy studies. This could probably be explained by a decrease in nickel allergy. The CE-DUR approach holds the potential of being an efficient and easy monitoring method of contact allergy prevalence.
PubMed ID
17868221 View in PubMed
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Adverse patient reactions during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159900
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2007 Dec;132(6):789-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Heidi M Kerosuo
Jon E Dahl
Author Affiliation
Nordic Institute of Dental Materials, Senior lecturer, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. heidi.kerosuo@utu.fi
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2007 Dec;132(6):789-95
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Alloys - adverse effects
Finland
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Delayed - etiology
Logistic Models
Nickel - adverse effects
Norway
Orthodontic Appliances - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Our aims in this study were to assess adverse patient reactions during orthodontic treatment with nickel-containing appliances and to investigate the need for and the use of nickel-free devices in orthodontic practices in Finland and Norway.
A questionnaire was mailed to orthodontists and dentists versed in orthodontics in both countries. They were asked to retrospectively assess the number of patients with adverse reactions and to describe the reactions, the appliances used, and any implications on treatment. Previous history of nickel allergy of patients with adverse reactions, and use of and need for nickel-free appliances in clinical practice were also addressed.
Forty-six percent of the respondents (n = 298) reported at least 1 adverse patient reaction during the last 5 years. More than half of the reactions had implications for the treatment. Finnish respondents observed significantly more adverse patient reactions than their Norwegian colleagues, and, in Finland, the adverse reactions were most frequently attributed to headgear treatment. Using nickel-containing fixed appliances in nickel-allergic patients was more common in Finland (77% of the respondents) than in Norway (65%).
Nearly half of the dentists regularly working with fixed appliances had observed at least 1 adverse patient reaction during treatment. Nickel-containing fixed appliances are generally used in most patients-even those with a suspected nickel allergy.
PubMed ID
18068598 View in PubMed
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[Air pollution from the Soviet Union and mortality in Finnmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55411
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Jun 10;109(16):1759-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-1989
Author
E. Lund
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Jun 10;109(16):1759-61
Date
Jun-10-1989
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - chemically induced - mortality
Nickel - adverse effects
Norway
Risk factors
USSR
Abstract
The effect of airborne pollution, especially nickel, from Kola has been studied in 10,612 persons who participated in a cardiovascular screening survey in Finnmark in 1974-75. The age-range was 35-49 years and a follow-up for death was conducted up to 1985. Men living in the community of Sør-Varanger (close to the border) had a relative risk (RR) for death from diseases of 1.2 (95% confidence intervall; 0.9-1.6) compared with the rest of Finnmark, for women RR = 1.1. The increase in mortality for men was due to infactus cordis RR = 1.5 (1.0-2.4), and was not consistent for women (RR = 0.9). The study does not support the view that air pollution in this area has increased the risk of death.
PubMed ID
2749649 View in PubMed
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Allergic contact dermatitis in children: the Ottawa hospital patch-testing clinic experience, 1996 to 2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157726
Source
Dermatitis. 2008 Mar-Apr;19(2):86-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marcia Hogeling
Melanie Pratt
Author Affiliation
Division of Dermatology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Dermatitis. 2008 Mar-Apr;19(2):86-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Allergens - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Cobalt - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Nickel - adverse effects
Ontario - epidemiology
Patch Tests
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Allergic contact dermatitis in children is a significant clinical problem. Patch testing is a diagnostic tool for the evaluation of patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis.
To determine the frequency and relevance of positive patch-test results in children and to identify the most common allergens in children at our clinic.
Retrospective chart review of 100 children and adolescents, aged 4 to 18 years, who were patch-tested at the Ottawa Hospital patch-testing clinic between 1996 and 2006. The children were patch-tested with the North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) standard series, supplementary series if indicated, and their own products if available.
Seventy percent of children had at least one positive patch-test reaction; 55.8% of positive patch-test reactions were relevant. The ratio of females to males was 62:38. The most common allergens were nickel sulfate (26%), cobalt (14%), fragrance mix (7%), neomycin (7%), colophony (6%), formaldehyde (4%), lanolin (4%), quaternium-15 (4%), and para-phenylenediamine (4%). Nickel co-reacted with cobalt (68%) and palladium (100%). Of children tested, 41% had a history of atopic dermatitis.
The frequency of positive and relevant allergens in children is similar to that in adults as compared with data from the NACDG 2001-2002 study period. Differences between the top 10 allergens in children and adults were seen. Nickel and cobalt were more common allergens in children, and colophony, lanolin, and para-phenylenediamine ranked in the top 10 allergens among children.
PubMed ID
18413109 View in PubMed
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Allergic contact dermatitis in Danish children referred for patch testing - a nationwide multicentre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256968
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2014 Feb;70(2):104-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Anne Birgitte Simonsen
Mette Deleuran
Charlotte Gotthard Mortz
Jeanne Duus Johansen
Mette Sommerlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2014 Feb;70(2):104-11
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Allergens - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - etiology
Facial Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hair Dyes - adverse effects
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Nickel - adverse effects
Patch Tests
Perfume - adverse effects
Prevalence
Referral and Consultation
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Abstract
Although contact allergy among children was previously considered to be rare, data from the past decade have shown that it is common among children and that the prevalence may be increasing.
To describe the demographics of all children referred for patch testing in Denmark during 2003-2011, to examine the frequency and relevance of positive patch test reactions, and to assess the most common allergens.
A retrospective analysis of the patch test data from the Danish National Database of Contact Allergy was performed.
Of 2594 children and adolescents aged 1-17?years, 25.1% had one or more positive patch test reactions. The associated relevance was 66.4%. The most common sensitizers were metals, fragrances, and hair dyes. The frequency of positive patch test reactions and allergic contact dermatitis was significantly higher among girls.
Allergic contact dermatitis in children is a significant clinical problem. Contact allergy should always be considered when children with recalcitrant eczema are encountered, and special attention should be paid to girls. Patch testing is important, and children may be tested with the same patch test concentrations as adults.
PubMed ID
24102181 View in PubMed
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Allergic patch test reactions to palladium chloride in schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213396
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1996 Jan;34(1):39-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
L. Kanerva
H. Kerosuo
A. Kullaa
E. Kerosuo
Author Affiliation
Section of Dermatology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1996 Jan;34(1):39-42
Date
Jan-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cross Reactions
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Nickel - adverse effects
Palladium - adverse effects
Patch Tests
Prevalence
Schools
Students
Abstract
A study of the prevalence of allergic patch test reactions to palladium chloride compared to nickel sulfate was performed in a group of Finnish schoolchildren. All adolescents 14-18 years of age in a Finnish town with 40,000 inhabitants, who had received orthodontic treatment with metallic appliances at a municipal dental clinic, were included in the study. The selection of patients was based on patient records. A non-treatment control group was randomly selected from the same age groups of the town population. A total of 700 subjects (77% of those invited), 417 (60%) girls and 283 (40%) boys, participated. The majority (91%) of the girls had pierced ears. Orthodontic treatment was equally common (67-70%) in the boys and the girls. The girls had a much higher frequency of allergic patch test reactions to both nickel sulfate and palladium chloride. Of the 700 adolescents tested, 48 (7%) had an allergic patch test reaction to palladium chloride. Of the 417 girls, 44 (11%) were palladium-chloride-positive, whereas only 4 of the 283 boys tested (1%) had an allergic patch test reaction to palladium chloride. 3 patients reacted to palladium chloride only, whereas all other patients with allergic patch test reactions to palladium chloride also had an allergic patch test reaction to nickel sulfate. The results support the concept of cross-reactivity between nickel sulfate and palladium chloride. The clinical significance of the allergic patch test reactions caused by palladium chloride remains unclear.
PubMed ID
8789224 View in PubMed
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Assessment of historical exposures in a nickel refinery in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20245
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Aug;26(4):338-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
T K Grimsrud
S R Berge
F. Resmann
T. Norseth
A. Andersen
Author Affiliation
The Cancer Registry of Norway, Montebello, Oslo. tom.grimsrud@kreftreg.no
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Aug;26(4):338-45
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Cohort Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Metallurgy
Nickel - adverse effects - analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was, on the basis of new information on nickel species and exposure levels, to generate a specific exposure matrix for epidemiologic analyses in a cohort of Norwegian nickel-refinery workers with a known excess of respiratory cancer. METHODS: A department-time-exposure matrix was constructed with average exposure to total nickel estimated as the arithmetic mean of personal measurements for periods between 1973 and 1994. From 1972 back to the start of production in 1910, exposure concentrations were estimated through retrograde calculation with multiplication factors developed on the basis of reported changes in the metallurgical process and work environment. The relative distribution of water-soluble nickel salts (sulfates and chlorides), metallic nickel, and particulates with limited solubility (sulfides and oxides) was mainly derived from speciation analyses conducted in the 1990s. RESULTS: The average concentration of nickel in the breathing zone was
PubMed ID
10994800 View in PubMed
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The association between metal allergy, total hip arthroplasty, and revision.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146844
Source
Acta Orthop. 2009 Dec;80(6):646-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Jacob Pontoppidan Thyssen
Stig Storgaard Jakobsen
Kåre Engkilde
Jeanne Duus Johansen
Kjeld Søballe
Torkil Menné
Author Affiliation
National Allergy Research Centre, Department of Dermato-allergology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen. jacpth01@geh.regionh.dk
Source
Acta Orthop. 2009 Dec;80(6):646-52
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Child
Chromium - adverse effects
Cobalt - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Hip Prosthesis - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Metals - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Nickel - adverse effects
Patch Tests
Prevalence
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Registries
Reoperation
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
It has been speculated that the prevalence of metal allergy may be higher in patients with implant failure. We compared the prevalence and cause of revisions following total hip arthroplasty (THA) in dermatitis patients suspected to have contact allergy and in patients in general with THA. Furthermore, we compared the prevalence of metal allergy in dermatitis patients with and without THA.
The Danish Hip Arthroplasty Registry (DHAR) contained detailed information on 90,697 operations. The Gentofte patch-test database contained test results for patients suspected of having allergic contact dermatitis (n = 18,794). Cases (n = 356) were defined as patch-tested dermatitis patients who also had primary THA performed. Two age- and sex-matched controls (n = 712) from the patch-test database were sought for each case.
The prevalence of revision was similar in cases (12%) and in patients from the DHAR (13%). The prevalence of metal allergy was similar in cases and controls. However, the prevalence of metal allergy was lower in cases who were patch-tested after operation (6%) than in those who were patch-tested before operation (16%) (OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1-8).
We found that the risk of surgical revision was not increased in patients with metal allergies and that the risk of metal allergy was not increased in cases who were operated, in comparison to controls. Despite some important study limitations, our observations add to the evidence that the risk of complications in metal allergic patients seems limited.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19995314 View in PubMed
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[Bronchopulmonary diseases features in miners of Kolsky Transpolar area].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150420
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2009;(4):35-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
S A Siurin
A N Nikanov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2009;(4):35-9
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Bronchial Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Copper - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Mining
Nickel - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prevalence
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
Miners engaged into open-cast and underground extraction of copper-nickel ores in Kolsky Transpolar area have chronic bronchitis as a main nosologic entity among chronic bronchopulmonary diseases (19.1% of the workers). Considerably lower (4.0% of the workers) occurrence concerns chronic obstructive lung disease and bronchial asthma, both developed before the occupational involvement (1.3% of the workers). Complex of occupational and nonoccupational risk factors is connected mostly with smoking that increases COLD/CB risk 10.7-15.8-fold.
PubMed ID
19514169 View in PubMed
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[Bronchopulmonary diseases in workers engaged in carbonyl production of nickel in the Kola Arctic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134326
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 Mar-Apr;(2):45-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
S A Siurin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 Mar-Apr;(2):45-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Dust
Extraction and Processing Industry
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Nickel - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
The paper gives data on the prevalence and pattern of chronic bronchopulmonary diseases (CBPD) in 188 workers engaged in carbonyl production of nickel versus 162 auxiliary process workers. Chronic bronchitis was the most common disease in both groups (11.2 and 5.6%, respectively). 9.6% of the carbonyl production workers were found to have toxic pneumofibrosis developing mainly in those having a service length of more than 20 years. As compared with auxiliary process workers, the nickel production process workers had a higher risk of CBPD (odds ratio 1.80; 95% confidence interval 1.00-3.22; p = 0.04496) who also came to the front in the pattern of occupational diseases (73.2% of all cases).
PubMed ID
21598645 View in PubMed
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118 records – page 1 of 12.