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Analysis of newspaper coverage of active aging through the lens of the 2002 World Health Organization Active Ageing Report: A Policy Framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call for Action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257220
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Dec;10(12):6799-819
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Boushra Abdullah
Gregor Wolbring
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary AB T2N 4N1, Canada. gwolbrin@ucalgary.ca.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Dec;10(12):6799-819
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Bibliometrics
Canada
Health Policy
Health promotion
Humans
Motor Activity
Newspapers - statistics & numerical data
Public Health
Socioeconomic Factors
World Health Organization
Abstract
As populations continue to grow older, efforts to support the process of aging well are important goals. Various synonyms are used to cover aging well, such as active aging. The World Health Organization published in 2002 the report Active Ageing: A Policy Framework that according to the call for papers, has brought active ageing to the forefront of international public health awareness. The 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call for Action was singled out in the call for papers as a key document promoting physical activity one goal of the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework. Media are to report to the public topics of importance to them. We investigated the newspaper coverage of aging well and synonymous terms such as active aging through the lens of the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity. As sources we used the following newspapers: China Daily, The Star (Malaysia), two UK newspapers (The Guardian, The Times), a database of 300 Canadian newspapers (Canadian Newsstand) and a US newspaper (The New York Times). The study generated data answering the following four research questions: (1) how often are the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity mentioned; (2) how often is the topic of active aging and terms conveying similar content (aging well, healthy aging, natural aging and successful aging) discussed; (3) which of the issues flagged as important in the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity are covered in the newspaper coverage of active aging and synonymous terms; (4) which social groups were mentioned in the newspapers covered. The study found a total absence of mentioning of the two key documents and a low level of coverage of "active aging" and terms conveying similar content. It found further a lack of engagement with the issues raised in the two key documents and a low level of mentioning of socially disadvantages groups. We posit that reading the newspapers we covered will not expose the reader to the two key documents and the issues linked to aging well including the need to increase physical activity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24317386 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of low back-pain-related content in Canadian newspaper media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157684
Source
J Spinal Disord Tech. 2008 Feb;21(1):1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Douglas P Gross
Jasmine Field
Kurt Shanski
Robert Ferrari
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada. dgross@ualberta.ca
Source
J Spinal Disord Tech. 2008 Feb;21(1):1-3
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Attitude to Health
Bed Rest
Canada
Culture
Exercise
Exercise Therapy
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Low Back Pain - psychology - therapy
Mass Media - statistics & numerical data - trends
Newspapers - statistics & numerical data - trends
Patient Education as Topic
Rest - psychology
Abstract
Review of newspaper articles.
To assess the content of newspaper articles in 2 provinces in Canada to determine if rest or avoidance of activity is being recommended for back pain.
Inaccurate back pain beliefs in the general public may arise due to messages in the mass media. One persisting belief in Canada is that rest or activity avoidance is needed until back pain resolves.
We searched newspapers in 2 Canadian provinces via an electronic database for articles discussing back pain. Two trained raters used an article review template to indicate whether the article's main recommendation was to stay active, rest, was neutral (indicating a balance between rest and activity), or did not provide advice on level of activity during an episode of back pain.
One hundred 29 articles were identified. The primary advice provided related to level of activity during an episode of back pain was stay active in 24% of articles, whereas no articles primarily recommended rest or avoidance of activity. Sixteen percent of articles were rated as neutral, indicating the authors suggested a balance between rest and activity.
Back-pain-related newspaper articles do not carry messages that advocate rest or avoidance of activity, but rather highlight the importance of staying active during an episode or participating in exercise.
PubMed ID
18418128 View in PubMed
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Cancer coverage in newspapers serving large and small communities in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192575
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Sep-Oct;92(5):372-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. MacDonald
L. Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Sep-Oct;92(5):372-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Resources
Humans
Journalism
Marketing of Health Services
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Newspapers - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Abstract
Local newspapers are an important source of health news, especially in small communities. We describe the amount and type of cancer information in Ontario daily newspapers dichotomized by circulation size (> 400,000 or 250,000 or
PubMed ID
11702493 View in PubMed
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Chronic disease coverage in Canadian aboriginal newspapers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2973
Source
J Health Commun. 2003 Sep-Oct;8(5):475-88
Publication Type
Article
Author
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Charlene Shannon
Juanne N Clarke
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. lhgoetz@healthy.uwaterloo.ca
Source
J Health Commun. 2003 Sep-Oct;8(5):475-88
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bibliometrics
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology
HIV Infections - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - ethnology
Newspapers - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine the volume and focus of articles on four chronic diseases in newspapers targeting First Nations, Métis, and Inuit in Canada. METHODS: From a sampling frame of 31 Aboriginal newspapers published in English from 1996-2000, 14 newspapers were randomly selected allowing for national and regional representation. Newspaper archives were searched at the National Library of Canada and articles selected if the disease terms cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or HIV/AIDS appeared in the headline, or in the first or last paragraph of the article. Articles were coded for inclusion of mobilizing information (local, distant, unrestricted, not specified, none) and content focus (scientific, human interest, commercial, other). Cancer articles were categorized by tumor site specificity. Data were analyzed by frequency, cross tabulations, and chi-square analysis. RESULTS: Of 400 chronic disease articles, there were significantly more articles on HIV/AIDS (167 or 41.8%) and diabetes (135 or 33.8%) and few articles on cancer (56 or 14%) and cardiovascular disease (30 articles or 7.5%) (p
PubMed ID
14530149 View in PubMed
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Critiquing fetal alcohol syndrome health communication campaigns targeted to American Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129995
Source
J Health Commun. 2012;17(1):6-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Terry L Rentner
Lynda Dee Dixon
Lara Lengel
Author Affiliation
School of Media and Communication, Bowling Green State University, 302 West Hall, Bowling Green, OH 43403, USA. trentne@bgsu.edu
Source
J Health Commun. 2012;17(1):6-21
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - prevention & control
Health Promotion - methods
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Newspapers - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
United States
Abstract
It is widely recognized American Indians and Alaska Natives have suffered from far worse health status than that of other Americans. Health communication campaigns directed to American Indians and Alaska Natives and their outcomes must be grounded in an understanding of the historical and ongoing marginalization and cultural dislocation of these groups. The authors draw upon the specific case of health communication campaigns to reduce cases of fetal alcohol syndrome among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Counteracting stereotyping of American Indians and alcohol consumption by mainstream American popular culture and mediated discourses, coverage of fetal alcohol syndrome in the media is assessed. The study analyzes 429 American Indian news articles from 1990 to 2010. Mainstream American and American Indian media should cover health concerns such as fetal alcohol syndrome more extensively. Researchers, health communication campaign developers, health policy makers, and mainstream media must be knowledgeable about American Indian and Alaskan Native identity, cultures, and history, and diversity across Nations. Last, and most important, health communication strategists and health policy makers must welcome American Indians and Alaska Natives to take leadership roles in communicating culture- and Nation-specific health campaign strategies to eliminate health disparities.
PubMed ID
22044046 View in PubMed
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Exploring the mutual constitution of racializing and medicalizing discourses of immigrant tuberculosis in the Canadian press.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126068
Source
Qual Health Res. 2012 Jul;22(7):911-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Sylvia Reitmanova
Diana L Gustafson
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2012 Jul;22(7):911-20
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Newspapers - statistics & numerical data - trends
Politics
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Social Perception
Socioeconomic Factors
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Abstract
Drawing on critical discourse analysis of Canadian press coverage of the immigrant tuberculosis problem, we expose the complex relationship between press-constructed discourses of immigrant health and current tuberculosis control policies in Canada. The focus of these policies is on screening and surveillance of immigrants rather than addressing social inequalities underlying the problem of immigrant tuberculosis. The biomedical focus and racializing character of current policies were reinforced in the Canadian press by depicting tuberculosis as a biomedical (rather than a social) disease imported to Canada by immigrants. The status of the immigrant body as health threat was produced by and through preexisting and mutually constitutive racializing and medicalizing discourses materialized in press coverage and tuberculosis control policies. Deracialization and demedicalization of health information disseminated in the press are potentially important factors to be considered when revising health policies that would address the socioeconomic and political factors that determine the health status of Canadian immigrants.
PubMed ID
22427457 View in PubMed
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For the patient. Do Canadian newspapers print readable, timely cancer stories?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175291
Source
Ethn Dis. 2005;15(2):354
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005

Front page or "buried" beneath the fold? Media coverage of carbon capture and storage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112493
Source
Public Underst Sci. 2014 May;23(4):411-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Amanda D Boyd
Travis B Paveglio
Author Affiliation
Washington State University, USA.
Source
Public Underst Sci. 2014 May;23(4):411-27
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Canada
Carbon Sequestration
Climate change
Dissent and Disputes
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Mass Media
Newspapers - statistics & numerical data
Public Opinion
Abstract
Media can affect public views and opinions on science, policy and risk issues. This is especially true of a controversial emerging technology that is relatively unknown. The study presented here employs a media content analysis of carbon capture and storage (CCS), one potential strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The authors analyzed all mentions of CCS in two leading Canadian national newspapers and two major western regional newspapers from the first article that discussed CCS in 2004 to the end of 2009 (825 articles). An in-depth content analysis was conducted to examine factors relating to risk from CCS, how the technology was portrayed and if coverage was negatively or positively biased. We conclude by discussing the possible impact of media coverage on support or opposition to CCS adoption.
PubMed ID
23825250 View in PubMed
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Gendered portraits of depression in Swedish newspapers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92995
Source
Qual Health Res. 2008 Jul;18(7):962-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Bengs Carita
Johansson Eva
Danielsson Ulla
Lehti Arja
Hammarström Anne
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2008 Jul;18(7):962-73
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depressive Disorder
Female
Gender Identity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Newspapers - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Self Efficacy
Stereotyping
Sweden
Abstract
Mass media are influential mediators of information, knowledge, and narratives of health and illness. In this article, we report on an examination of personal accounts of illness as presented in three Swedish newspapers, focusing on the gendered representation of laypersons' experiences of depression. A database search identified all articles mentioning depression during the year 2002. Twenty six articles focusing on personal experiences of depression were then subjected to a qualitative content analysis. We identified four themes: displaying a successful facade, experiencing a cracking facade, losing and regaining control, and explaining the illness. We found both similarities and differences with regard to gendered experiences. The mediated accounts of depression both upheld and challenged traditional gender stereotypes. The women's stories were more detailed, relational, emotionally oriented, and embodied. The portrayal of men was less emotional and expressive, and described a more dramatic onset of depression, reflecting hegemonic patterns of masculinity.
PubMed ID
18552322 View in PubMed
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Get the news on physical activity research: a content analysis of physical activity research in the Canadian print media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162994
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2007 Apr;4(2):180-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Guy Faulkner
Sara-Jane Finlay
Stephannie C Roy
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2007 Apr;4(2):180-92
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bibliometrics
Canada
Exercise
Health status
Humans
Motor Activity
Newspapers - statistics & numerical data
Periodicals as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Research - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
News media may play a critical role in disseminating research about physical activity and health. This study examined how much physical activity research gets reported in the media and its prominence and credibility.
A content analysis was conducted of the reporting of physical activity research in Canadian national and local newspapers from November 2004 to April 2005.
Physical activity research was given some prominence and treated as news through the use of several devices to infer credibility. However, newspapers appeared to invest little in the production of physical activity research as news and information about research methodology was infrequent.
While stories reporting physical activity research were given some prominence and credibility, the lack of significant investment and the limited reporting on research methodology suggests that important aspects of research related to physical activity may not be well represented in newspaper coverage.
PubMed ID
17570887 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.