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The Ability of Posters to Enhance the Comfort Level with Breastfeeding in a Public Venue in Rural Newfoundland and Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279830
Source
J Hum Lact. 2016 Feb;32(1):174-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Alissa Vieth
Janine Woodrow
Janet Murphy-Goodridge
Courtney O'Neil
Barbara Roebothan
Source
J Hum Lact. 2016 Feb;32(1):174-81
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Audiovisual Aids
Breast Feeding - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Public Opinion
Rural Population
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The acceptance and support of breastfeeding in public venues can influence breastfeeding practices and, ultimately, the health of the population.
The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether posters targeted at the general public could improve acceptability of breastfeeding in public places.
A convenience sample of 255 participants was surveyed at shopping centers in 2 rural communities of Newfoundland and Labrador. Experimentally, questions were posed to 117 participants pre- and post-exposure to 2 specific posters designed to promote public acceptance of breastfeeding in public.
Initially, we surveyed that only 51.9% of participants indicated that they were comfortable with a woman breastfeeding anywhere in public. However, context played a role, whereby a doctor's office (84.5%) or park (81.4%) were the most acceptable public places for breastfeeding, but least acceptable was a business office environment (66.7%). Of participants, 35.4% indicated previously viewing specific posters. We used a visual analog scale to test poster viewing on the acceptability of public breastfeeding in the context of a doctor's office and a restaurant. Results of pre- versus post-viewing of the promotional posters indicated significant improvements in both scenarios: in a doctor's office (P = .035) and in a restaurant (P = .021).
Nearly 50% of the surveyed population indicated discomfort with a mother breastfeeding in public. Both cross-sectional and interventional evidence showed that posters significantly improved the reported level of comfort toward seeing breastfeeding in public.
PubMed ID
26151965 View in PubMed
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The abortion issue in Newfoundland: a province divided.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235319
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Apr 15;136(8):865-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1987

Accounting for vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage in pandemic critical care triage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96997
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Chris Kaposy
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. christopher.kaposy@med.mun.ca
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Critical Care
Cultural Characteristics
Disaster Planning - trends
Disease Outbreaks
Health Care Rationing - ethics
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - ethnology - mortality - virology
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - standards
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Patient Selection - ethics
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Social Class
Triage - methods - organization & administration - standards - trends
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
In a pandemic situation, resources in intensive care units may be stretched to the breaking point, and critical care triage may become necessary. In such a situation, I argue that a patient's combined vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage should be a justification for giving that patient some priority for critical care. In this article I present an example of a critical care triage protocol that recognizes the moral relevance of vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage, from the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.
PubMed ID
20465071 View in PubMed
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Actionable nuggets: knowledge translation tool for the needs of patients with spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269783
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2015 May;61(5):e240-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Mary Ann McColl
Alice Aiken
Karen Smith
Alexander McColl
Michael Green
Marshall Godwin
Richard Birtwhistle
Kathleen Norman
Gabrielle Brankston
Michael Schaub
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2015 May;61(5):e240-8
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia
Family Practice - education
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Newfoundland and Labrador
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Primary Health Care
Spinal Cord Injuries
Translational Medical Research - methods
Abstract
To present the results of a pilot study of an innovative methodology for translating best evidence about spinal cord injury (SCI) for family practice.
Review of Canadian and international peer-reviewed literature to develop SCI Actionable Nuggets, and a mixed qualitative-quantitative evaluation to determine Nuggets' effect on physician knowledge of and attitudes toward patients with SCI, as well as practice accessibility.
Ontario, Newfoundland, and Australia.
Forty-nine primary care physicians.
Twenty Actionable Nuggets (pertaining to key health issues associated with long-term SCI) were developed. Nugget postcards were mailed weekly for 20 weeks to participating physicians. Prior knowledge of SCI was self-rated by participants; they also completed an online posttest to assess the information they gained from the Nugget postcards. Participants' opinions about practice accessibility and accommodations for patients with SCI, as well as the acceptability and usefulness of Nuggets, were assessed in interviews.
With Actionable Nuggets, participants' knowledge of the health needs of patients with SCI improved, as knowledge increased from a self-rating of fair (58%) to very good (75%) based on posttest quiz results. The mean overall score for accessibility and accommodations in physicians' practices was 72%. Participants' awareness of the need for screening and disease prevention among this population also increased. The usefulness and acceptability of SCI Nugget postcards were rated as excellent.
Actionable Nuggets are a knowledge translation tool designed to provide family physicians with concise, practical information about the most prevalent and pressing primary care needs of patients with SCI. This evidence-based resource has been shown to be an excellent fit with information consumption processes in primary care. They were updated and adapted for distribution by the Canadian Medical Association to approximately 50,000 primary care physicians in Canada, in both English and French.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26167564 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Nov;53(11):1961-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Graham J Worrall
Author Affiliation
Dr William H. Newhook Memorial Health Centre, Whitbourne, NL. gworrall@mun.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Nov;53(11):1961-2
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Family Practice - methods
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Pharyngitis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Streptococcal Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Streptococcus agalactiae - drug effects - isolation & purification
Treatment Outcome
Notes
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 Mar 20;134(6):506-811255529
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2006;(4):CD00002317054126
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Jan 13;158(1):75-839475915
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Jul 15;35(2):113-2512087516
PubMed ID
18000276 View in PubMed
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Adaptation strategies of forage soybeans cultivated on acidic soils under cool climate to produce high quality forage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302007
Source
Plant Sci. 2019 Jun; 283:278-289
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2019
Author
Muhammad Nadeem
Thu Huong Pham
Ashley Nieuwenhuis
Waqas Ali
Muhammad Zaeem
Waqar Ashiq
Syed Shah Mohioudin Gillani
Charles Manful
Oludoyin Adeseun Adigun
Lakshman Galagedara
Mumtaz Cheema
Raymond Thomas
Author Affiliation
School of Science and the Environment, Grenfell Campus, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Corner Brook, A2H 5G4, Canada; Department of Environmental Sciences, COMSATS University of Islamabad, Vehari 61100, Pakistan. Electronic address: mnadeem@grenfell.mun.ca.
Source
Plant Sci. 2019 Jun; 283:278-289
Date
Jun-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animal Feed
Climate
Crop Production - methods
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Newfoundland and Labrador
Plant Roots - growth & development - metabolism
Soil
Soybeans - growth & development - metabolism
Abstract
Boreal soils tend to be podzols characterized by acidic pH, which can further limit forage crop growth and production. It is unclear, how forage soybeans adopt to produce forage with high nutritional quality when cultivated on podzols in boreal climate. To answer this question, we cultivated forage soybeans on agricultural podzols at 3 farm sites with varied soil pH (6.8, 6.0 or 5.1), and assessed the root membrane lipidome remodeling response to such climatic conditions. Contrary to our expectations, significantly lower biomass was observed at pH 6.8 compared to 6.0 and 5.1. However, surprisingly the plants produced similar forage quality at 6.8 and 5.1?pH. Three major lipid classes including phospholipids, glycolipids and phytosterols were observed in roots irrespective of soil pH. Phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidic acid (PA), and acylated glucosyl betasitosterol ester (AGlcSiE) accounted for 95% of the root lipidome, and expressed significant changes in response to cultivation across the three soil pH levels. These lipids were also observed to have strong correlations with forage production, and forage quality. Therefore, soybean genotypes with higher abilities to remodel PC, PE, PA, and AGlcSiE could be better suited for producing higher quality forage in acid podzolic soils characteristics of boreal ecosystems.
PubMed ID
31128698 View in PubMed
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Adapting the Hamilton Health Sciences critical care pandemic triage protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144550
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13(2):60-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Chris Kaposy
Natalie Bandrauk
Daryl Pullman
Rick Singleton
Fern Brunger
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Division of Community Health and Humanities, at Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland. christopher.kaposy@med.mun.ca
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13(2):60-3
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Disease Outbreaks
Emergency Service, Hospital
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - therapy
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Organizational Case Studies
Triage - methods - organization & administration
PubMed ID
20357547 View in PubMed
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Adequacy of niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 intakes from foods among Newfoundland and Labrador adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113239
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):63-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jennifer Colbourne
Natasha Baker
Peter Wang
Lin Liu
Christina Tucker
Barbara Roebothan
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):63-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cereals
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Food, Fortified
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Niacin - administration & dosage - blood
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Recommended dietary allowances
Risk factors
Vitamin B 12 - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Adequacy of intake for niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 from food was estimated in an adult population in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). Also considered was whether study findings support current Canadian food fortification policies.
Four hundred randomly selected adult NL residents were surveyed by telephone. Secondary analysis was performed on two 24-hour food recalls for each participant. Mean daily intakes of niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 were estimated from foods only and compared by sex/age subgroup. Adequacy of intakes was estimated. Contributions of folate by ready-to-eat cereal and bread products were also estimated.
Intakes of all three nutrients were higher in men. In comparison with recommendations, daily niacin intakes were as follows: excessive for 21.9% of all participants (and for 56.8% of men aged 28 to 54), within the recommended range for 73.6%, and less than adequate for 4.5%. In comparison with recommendations, daily folate intakes were as follows: within the recommended range for 18.1% of participants and less than adequate for 81.9%. In comparison with recommendations, daily vitamin B12 intakes were less than adequate for 36.3% of participants.
More than 20% of those surveyed were consuming, from food alone, niacin at levels above the maximum recommended. Food fortification policies pertaining to niacin should be revisited. In addition, despite fortification, NL adults may be consuming inadequate amounts of folate from foods.
PubMed ID
23750977 View in PubMed
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Adolescent and pre-adolescent suicide in Newfoundland and Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225937
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1991 Aug;36(6):432-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
D. Aldridge
K. St John
Author Affiliation
Lakehead Regional Family Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1991 Aug;36(6):432-6
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Cause of Death
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Periodicity
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study investigated suicides by people aged ten to 19 in Newfoundland and Labrador from 1977 to 1988. It is the first study of suicide in the province to use the records of death from all eight hospital pathology departments in the province and from the office of the Chief Forensic Pathologist. Cases were selected for the study using standardized criteria, independent of the manner of death recorded on the death certificate. A suicide rate of 4.37 per 100,000 was found. This rate and the age- and sex-specific suicide rates are lower than the official figures for Canada but higher than those reported in earlier Newfoundland studies. The rate for males was nearly five times the female rate, and the rate for people aged 15 to 19 was nearly six times that of people aged ten to 14. Suicide rates for Labrador were higher than for the island portion of the province for both Native and for non Native adolescents. Extremely high rates of suicide were found only among the Native population living in Northern Labrador, while none were recorded for Native people elsewhere. Firearms accounted for 54% and hanging for 33% of all suicides. Thirty percent of suicides occurred on a Saturday. Only 36 of the 63 deaths included in this study were designated as suicide on death certificates. The higher rate of under-reporting of suicide than in other jurisdictions suggests that official rates may not be useful for comparisons. The reasons for the high rate of under-reporting are discussed.
PubMed ID
1933747 View in PubMed
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794 records – page 1 of 80.