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225 records – page 1 of 23.

Acute pain management in burn patients: appraisal and thematic analysis of four clinical guidelines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265210
Source
Burns. 2014 Dec;40(8):1463-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Hejdi Gamst-Jensen
Pernille Nygaard Vedel
Viktoria Oline Lindberg-Larsen
Ingrid Egerod
Source
Burns. 2014 Dec;40(8):1463-9
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Pain - etiology - psychology - therapy
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Anxiety - drug therapy - psychology
Burn Units
Burns - complications - psychology - therapy
Child
Denmark
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Hypnosis, Anesthetic
New Zealand
Pain Management - psychology - standards
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - psychology - therapy
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Burn patients suffer excruciating pain due to their injuries and procedures related to surgery, wound care, and mobilization. Acute Stress Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, chronic pain and depression are highly prevalent among survivors of severe burns. Evidence-based pain management addresses and alleviates these complications. The aim of our study was to compare clinical guidelines for pain management in burn patients in selected European and non-European countries. We included pediatric guidelines due to the high rate of children in burn units.
The study had a comparative retrospective design using combined methodology of instrument appraisal and thematic analysis. Three investigators appraised guidelines from burn units in Denmark (DK), Sweden (SE), New Zealand (NZ), and USA using the AGREE Instrument (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation), version II, and identified core themes in the guidelines.
The overall scores expressing quality in six domains of the AGREE instrument were variable at 22% (DK), 44% (SE), 100% (NZ), and 78% (USA). The guidelines from NZ and USA were highly recommended, the Swedish was recommended, whereas the Danish was not recommended. The identified core themes were: continuous pain, procedural pain, postoperative pain, pain assessment, anxiety, and non-pharmacological interventions.
The study demonstrated variability in quality, transparency, and core content in clinical guidelines on pain management in burn patients. The most highly recommended guidelines provided clear and accurate recommendations for the nursing and medical staff on pain management in burn patients. We recommend the use of a validated appraisal tool such as the AGREE instrument to provide more consistent and evidence-based care to burn patients in the clinic, to unify guideline construction, and to enable interdepartmental comparison of treatment and outcomes.
PubMed ID
25277698 View in PubMed
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Adoption of information technology in primary care physician offices in New Zealand and Denmark, Part 3: Medical record environment comparisons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90150
Source
Inform Prim Care. 2008;16(4):285-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Protti Denis
Bowden Tom
Johansen Ib
Author Affiliation
Health Informatics, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. dprotti@uvic.ca
Source
Inform Prim Care. 2008;16(4):285-90
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Diffusion of Innovation
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - utilization
New Zealand
Physicians' Offices
Physicians, Family
Abstract
This is the third in a series of five papers about the use of computing technology in general practitioner (GP) practices in Denmark and New Zealand. This paper looks at the environments within which electronic medical records (EMRs) operate, including their functionality and the extent to which electronic communications are used to send and receive clinical information. It also introduces the notion of a longitudinal electronic health record (versus an EMR).
PubMed ID
19192330 View in PubMed
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Airway basement membrane perimeter distensibility and airway smooth muscle area in asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158069
Source
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2008 Jun;104(6):1703-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Alan L James
Francis H Green
Michael J Abramson
Tony R Bai
Marisa Dolhnikoff
Thais Mauad
Karen O McKay
John G Elliot
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonary Physiology, West Australian Sleep Disorders Research Institute, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. alj@westnet.com.au
Source
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2008 Jun;104(6):1703-8
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - mortality - pathology - physiopathology
Australia
Basement Membrane - pathology - physiopathology
Brazil
British Columbia
Case-Control Studies
Child
Female
Humans
Lung - pathology - physiopathology
Lung Compliance
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Smooth - pathology - physiopathology
New Zealand
Abstract
The perimeter of the basement membrane (Pbm) of an airway viewed in cross section is used as a marker of airway size because in normal lungs it is relatively constant, despite variations in airway smooth muscle (ASM) shortening and airway collapse. In vitro studies (McParland BE, Pare PD, Johnson PR, Armour CL, Black JL. J Appl Physiol 97: 556-563, 2004; Noble PB, Sharma A, McFawn PK, Mitchell HW. J Appl Physiol 99: 2061-2066, 2005) have suggested that differential stretch of the Pbm between asthmatic and nonasthmatic airways fixed in inflation may occur and lead to an overestimation of ASM thickness in asthma. The relationships between the Pbm and the area of ASM were compared in transverse sections of airways from cases of fatal asthma (F) and from nonasthmatic control (C) cases where the lung tissue had been fixed inflated (Fi; Ci) or uninflated (Fu; Cu). When all available airways were used, the regression slopes were increased in Fu and Cu, compared with Fi and Ci, and increased in Fu and Fi, compared with Cu and Ci, suggesting effects of both inflation and asthma group, respectively. When analyses were limited to airway sizes that were available for all groups (Pbm
PubMed ID
18369095 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking, social class and cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11116
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1997;(138):251-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
H. Møller
H. Tønnesen
Author Affiliation
Center for Research in Health and Social Statistics, Danish National Research Foundation, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1997;(138):251-63
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Brazil - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Food Habits
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
New Zealand - epidemiology
Population
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Abstract
This chapter reviews the data on occurrence of cancers that are potentially caused by alcohol drinking (cancers of the upper gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, and liver cancer) in relation to social class. In order to assess the role of alcohol drinking in the observed social class gradients of these cancers, we have particularly looked for consistency in the gradients of different alcohol-related cancers, and used lung cancer occurrence to judge the role of tobacco smoking, which is the major other determinant of these diseases. Additional data on levels of alcohol drinking and on the occurrence of other alcohol-related morbidity are brought into the discussion where available. A role of alcohol drinking in the observed negative social class gradients for alcohol-related cancers is very likely in men in France, Italy and New Zealand. Evidence that is less strong, but is suggestive of a role of alcohol drinking, is seen for men in Brazil, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and Denmark. Although a role of alcohol drinking is likely or possible in certain populations, other factors may contribute as well, most notably tobacco smoking and dietary habits. Additional data on the frequency of complications after surgical procedures in alcohol drinkers are reviewed briefly.
PubMed ID
9353668 View in PubMed
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An evaluation and comparison of three commonly used statistical models for automatic detection of outbreaks in epidemiological data of communicable diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82991
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2006 Aug;134(4):863-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Rolfhamre P.
Ekdahl K.
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control (SMI), Solna, Sweden. per.rolfhamre@smi.ki.se
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2006 Aug;134(4):863-71
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia - epidemiology
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
England - epidemiology
Hepatitis A - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Models, Statistical
New Zealand - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Tularemia - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
We evaluated three established statistical models for automated 'early warnings' of disease outbreaks; counted data Poisson CuSums (used in New Zealand), the England and Wales model (used in England and Wales) and SPOTv2 (used in Australia). In the evaluation we used national Swedish notification data from 1992 to 2003 on campylobacteriosis, hepatitis A and tularemia. The average sensitivity and positive predictive value for CuSums were 71 and 53%, for the England and Wales model 87 and 82% and for SPOTv2 95 and 49% respectively. The England and Wales model and the SPOTv2 model were superior to CuSums in our setting. Although, it was more difficult to rank the former two, we recommend the SPOTv2 model over the England and Wales model, mainly because of a better sensitivity. However, the impact of previous outbreaks on baseline levels was less in the England and Wales model. The CuSums model did not adjust for previous outbreaks.
PubMed ID
16371181 View in PubMed
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An international look at school-based children's dental services

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41650
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1978 Jul;68(7):664-668
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1978
  1 website  
Author
Dunning, JM
Dunning, N
Author Affiliation
Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Department of DentalEcology
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1978 Jul;68(7):664-668
Date
Jul-1978
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Australia
Child
Child, Preschool
Costs and Cost Analysis
Delivery of Health Care
Dental Assistants - utilization
Dental Clinics - utilization
Dental Equipment - economics
Humans
New Zealand
School Dentistry - economics
Sweden
Abstract
School-based dental clinics, when well-managed, can bring good quality care to children where they normally congregate, thus avoiding many of the problems found where children must be taken to private offices out of school hours. Both capital and running expenses for primary care can be substantially reduced. Utilization figures for school-based dental services now reach 98 per cent of eligible children in New Zealand, where dental nurses do simple operative dentistry including cavity preparation and fillings. Australia, where a modified New Zealand plan has been expanding for about 12 years, is moving rapidly to attain similar utilization. In Sweden, 95 per cent of the school-age population is reported to receive school-managed dental service through a government program. In the United States, however, it is commonly reported that less than one-half the school-age population receives good periodic dental care.
PubMed ID
665884 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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An international study of the exposure of children to traffic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34249
Source
Inj Prev. 1997 Jun;3(2):89-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
I. Roberts
J. Carlin
C. Bennett
E. Bergstrom
B. Guyer
T. Nolan
R. Norton
I B Pless
R. Rao
M. Stevenson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Child Health, University of London, UK.
Source
Inj Prev. 1997 Jun;3(2):89-93
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia
Automobiles - statistics & numerical data
Bicycling - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Child
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Data Collection
Female
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
New Zealand
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sampling Studies
Sweden
Transportation - methods
United States
Walking - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine the extent of international differences in children's exposure to traffic as pedestrians or bicyclists. DESIGN: Children's travel patterns were surveyed using a parent-child administered questionnaire. Children were sampled via primary schools, using a probability cluster sampling design. SETTING: Six cities in five countries: Melbourne and Perth (Australia), Montreal (Canada), Auckland (New Zealand), Umeå (Sweden), and Baltimore (USA). SUBJECTS: Children aged 6 and 9 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Modes of travel on the school-home journey, total daily time spent walking, and the average daily number of roads crossed. MAIN FINDINGS: Responses were obtained from the parents of 13423 children. There are distinct patterns of children's travel in the six cities studied. Children's travel in the three Australasian cities, Melbourne, Perth and Auckland, is characterised by high car use, low levels of bicycling, and a steep decline in walking with increasing car ownership. In these cities, over a third of the children sampled spent less than five minutes walking per day. In Montreal, walking and public transport were the most common modes of travel. In Umeå, walking and bicycling predominated, with very low use of motorised transport. In comparison with children in the Australasian and North American cities, children in Umeå spend more time walking, with 87% of children walking for more than five minutes per day. CONCLUSIONS: There are large international differences in the extent to which children walk and cycle. These findings would suggest that differences in 'exposure to risk' may be an important contributor to international differences in pedestrian injury rates. There are also substantial differences in pedestrian exposure to risk by levels of car ownership-differences that may explain socioeconomic differentials in pedestrian injury rates.
PubMed ID
9213152 View in PubMed
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225 records – page 1 of 23.