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21st century rural nursing: Navajo Traditional and Western medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187143
Source
Nurs Adm Q. 2002;26(5):47-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Barbara L O'Brien
Rosemary M Anslow
Wanda Begay
Sister Benvinda A Pereira
Mary Pat Sullivan
Author Affiliation
Magnetic Health Care Strategies, LLC, Middletown, New Jersey, USA.
Source
Nurs Adm Q. 2002;26(5):47-57
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arizona
Case Management - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Medicine, Traditional
New Mexico
Nurse practitioners
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
Past experiences enhance the future. Health care providers gaining expertise in creative thinking, traditional medicine, spirituality, and cultural sensitivity is an essential requirement for 21st century health care. We must stay mindful that poverty, isolation, and rural living may create new forms of social exclusion because of lack of communication and rapidly changing technology. Conversely, sensory overload resulting from a faster paced lifestyle and rapid enhancements in technology may cause increased tension and stress. This article reviews successes that may offer the reader ideas on coping with the provision of health care services in such a volatile changing environment, while honoring tradition and cultural competency.
PubMed ID
12515233 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-related deaths of American Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11799
Source
JAMA. 1992 Dec 16;268(23):3317-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-1992

American Indian/Alaska Native alcohol-related incarceration and treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77302
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(3):1-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Feldstein Sarah W
Venner Kamilla L
May Philip A
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1161, USA.
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(3):1-22
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - ethnology - rehabilitation
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Analysis of Variance
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
New Mexico
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Rehabilitation - methods
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
American Indian/Alaska Natives have high rates of alcohol-related arrests and are overrepresented in justice systems. To understand the relationship between alcohol dependence, treatment, and alcohol-related incarceration, this study queried American Indian/Alaska Natives currently in remission from alcohol dependence. Participants reported receiving 0 to 43 treatment experiences. Moreover, participants had a significantly greater number of alcohol-related incarcerations than all other treatments combined. These findings underline the importance of making alcohol treatment available within criminal justice settings.
PubMed ID
17602406 View in PubMed
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Source
Med Sci (Paris). 2016 Jan;32(1):117-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Bertrand Jordan
Source
Med Sci (Paris). 2016 Jan;32(1):117-9
Date
Jan-2016
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
DNA Repair
Genetics - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
New Mexico
Nobel Prize
Sweden
Turkey
Abstract
This year's Nobel Prize for chemistry recognizes the seminal contributions of three researchers who discovered the existence and the basic mechanisms of DNA repair: base excision repair, mismatch repair, and nucleotide excision repair. They have since been joined by many scientists elucidating diverse aspects of these complex mechanisms that now constitute a thriving research field with many applications, notably for understanding oncogenesis and devising more effective therapies.
PubMed ID
26850617 View in PubMed
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Assessing health-related quality of life in Northern Plains American Indians: prominence of physical activity as a health behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100501
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2010;17(1):25-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Dmitri Poltavski
Jeffrey Holm
Nancy Vogeltanz-Holm
Leander McDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of North DakotaGrand Forks, ND 58202-8380, USA. dpoltavski@medicine.nodak.edu
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2010;17(1):25-48
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.) - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology
Motor Activity - physiology
New Mexico - epidemiology - ethnology
North Dakota - epidemiology - ethnology
Quality of Life - psychology
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Rural Population
United States - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Associations of behavioral health risks and healthy behaviors with self-reported health-related quality of life measures were investigated in a Northern Plains American Indian sample. Participants were surveyed in person using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey. The results showed that regular physical activity was significantly associated with better self-reported overall health, fewer mentally unhealthy and activity limitation days in the past 30 days, and with a greater number of good health days.
PubMed ID
20683822 View in PubMed
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Barriers to healthcare as reported by rural and urban interprofessional providers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82500
Source
J Interprof Care. 2006 Mar;20(2):105-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Brems Christiane
Johnson Mark E
Warner Teddy D
Roberts Laura Weiss
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. cbrems@uaa.alaska.edu
Source
J Interprof Care. 2006 Mar;20(2):105-18
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Personnel
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
New Mexico
Rural Health Services - utilization
Urban Health Services - utilization
Abstract
The research literature is replete with reports of barriers to care perceived by rural patients seeking healthcare. Less often reported are barriers perceived by the rural healthcare providers themselves. The current study is an extensive survey of over 1,500 healthcare providers randomly selected from two US states with large rural populations, Alaska and New Mexico. Barriers consistently identified across rural and urban regions by all healthcare professionals were Patient Complexity, Resource Limitations, Service Access, Training Constraints, and Patient Avoidance of Care. Findings confirmed that rural areas, however, struggle more with healthcare barriers than urban and small urban areas, especially as related to Resource Limitations, Confidentiality Limitations, Overlapping Roles, Provider Travel, Service Access, and Training Constraints. Almost consistently, the smaller a provider's practice community, the greater the reports of barriers, with the most severe barriers reported in small rural communities.
PubMed ID
16608714 View in PubMed
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Breaking the cycle/mending the hoop: adverse childhood experiences among incarcerated American Indian/Alaska Native women in New Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86815
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2008 Mar;29(3):300-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
De Ravello Lori
Abeita Jessica
Brown Pam
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. lderavello@cdc.gov
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2008 Mar;29(3):300-15
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Domestic Violence - psychology
Family Characteristics
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Life Change Events
Middle Aged
New Mexico
Prisoners - psychology
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
Incarcerated American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women have multiple physical, social, and emotional concerns, many of which may stem from adverse childhood experiences (ACE). We interviewed 36 AI/AN women incarcerated in the New Mexico prison system to determine the relationship between ACE and adult outcomes. ACE assessment included physical neglect, dysfunctional family (e.g., household members who abused substances, were mentally ill or suicidal, or who were incarcerated), violence witnessed in the home, physical abuse, and sexual abuse. The most prevalent ACE was dysfunctional family (75%), followed by witnessing violence (72%), sexual abuse (53%), physical abuse (42%), and physical neglect (22%). ACE scores were positively associated with arrests for violent offenses, lifetime suicide attempt(s), and intimate partner violence.
PubMed ID
18350429 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular knowledge among urban American Indians and Alaska Natives: first steps in addressing cardiovascular health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129680
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2011;5(3):273-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Angela G Brega
Timothy Noe
Crystal Loudhawk-Hedgepeth
Dakotah M Jim
Bradley Morse
Kelly Moore
Spero M Manson
Author Affiliation
Center for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, Corolado School of Public Health, University of Corolado Denver, USA.
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2011;5(3):273-9
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - ethnology
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Colorado - epidemiology
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
New Mexico - epidemiology
Risk factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is common among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Given limited access to health care, urban AI/ANs may be at particular risk. Lack of available data, however, limits our understanding of cardiovascular health in this population.
We conducted a survey to characterize CVD-related knowledge, behavior, and risk of urban AI/ANs. Results related to knowledge are reported.
In collaboration with the Indian clinics in two urban communities, we surveyed 298 AI/ANs.
Respondents recognized approximately half of the symptoms of heart attack and stroke, and were significantly less likely to recognize each symptom than reported in national studies using the same items. General CVD knowledge (e.g., risks of high blood pressure) was stronger, although areas for improvement were noted.
Urban AI/ANs would benefit from efforts to enhance CVD knowledge. These preliminary data are providing the foundation for community-based efforts to address CVD risk among urban AI/ANs.
PubMed ID
22080775 View in PubMed
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Care in the country: a historical case study of long-term sustainability in 4 rural health centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149620
Source
Am J Public Health. 2009 Sep;99(9):1612-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
D Brad Wright
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA. bradwright@unc.edu
Source
Am J Public Health. 2009 Sep;99(9):1612-8
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
California
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Community Networks - organization & administration
Decision Making, Organizational
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Kentucky
Louisiana
New Mexico
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Personnel Loyalty
Physician's Role
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Rural health services - organization & administration
Tennessee
Abstract
From 1978 to 1983, researchers at the University of North Carolina conducted a National Evaluation of Rural Primary Care Programs. Thirty years later, many of the programs they studied have closed, but the challenges of providing rural health care have persisted. I explored the histories of 4 surviving rural primary care programs and identified factors that contributed to their sustainability. These included physician advocates, innovative practices, organizational flexibility, and community integration. As rural health programs look ahead, identifying future generations of physician advocates is a crucial next step in developing the rural primary care workforce. It is also important for these programs to find ways to cope with high rates of staff turnover.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19608960 View in PubMed
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Cesarean delivery in Native American women: are low rates explained by practices common to the Indian health service?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173143
Source
Birth. 2005 Sep;32(3):170-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Sheila F Mahoney
Lorraine Halinka Malcoe
Author Affiliation
Reproductive Biology and Medicine Branch of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, United States.
Source
Birth. 2005 Sep;32(3):170-8
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cesarean Section - utilization
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Hospitals, Rural
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Multivariate Analysis
New Mexico
Nurse Midwives
Obstetrics
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Risk factors
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
Studying populations with low cesarean delivery rates can identify strategies for reducing unnecessary cesareans in other patient populations. Native American women have among the lowest cesarean delivery rates of all United States populations, yet few studies have focused on Native Americans. The study purpose was to determine the rate and risk factors for cesarean delivery in a Native American population.
We used a case-control design nested within a cohort of Native American live births, > or = 35 weeks of gestation (n = 789), occurring at an Indian Health Service hospital during 1996-1999. Data were abstracted from the labor and delivery logbook, the hospital's primary source of birth certificate data. Univariate and multivariate analyses examined demographic, prenatal, obstetric, intrapartum, and fetal factors associated with cesarean versus vaginal delivery.
The total cesarean rate was 9.6 percent (95% CI 7.2-12.0). Nulliparity, a medical diagnosis, malpresentation, induction, labor length > 12.1 hours, arrested labor, fetal distress, meconium, and gestations
Notes
Comment In: Birth. 2006 Mar;33(1):86-716499538
PubMed ID
16128970 View in PubMed
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65 records – page 1 of 7.