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Absence of serotype-specific surface antigen and altered teichoic acid glycosylation among epidemic-associated strains of Listeria monocytogenes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197060
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
E E Clark
I. Wesley
F. Fiedler
N. Promadej
S. Kathariou
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Antigens, Surface - analysis
Cheese - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Microbiology
Glycosylation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Mexico - epidemiology
New England - epidemiology
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Serotyping
Teichoic Acids - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Outbreaks of food-borne listeriosis have often involved strains of serotype 4b. Examination of multiple isolates from three different outbreaks revealed that ca. 11 to 29% of each epidemic population consisted of strains which were negative with the serotype-specific monoclonal antibody c74.22, lacked galactose from the teichoic acid of the cell wall, and were resistant to the serotype 4b-specific phage 2671.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11015420 View in PubMed
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The diabetic disadvantage: historical outcomes measures in diabetic patients undergoing cardiac surgery -- the pre-intravenous insulin era.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164375
Source
Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2006;18(4):281-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Jeremiah R Brown
Fred H Edwards
Gerald T O'Connor
Cathy S Ross
Anthony P Furnary
Author Affiliation
Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA. Jeremiah.R.Brown@Dartmouth.edu
Source
Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2006;18(4):281-8
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aortic Valve - surgery
Canada - epidemiology
Coronary Artery Bypass
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - surgery
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy - mortality
Heart Valve Diseases - mortality - surgery
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Infusions, Intravenous
Insulin - therapeutic use
Length of Stay
Longitudinal Studies
Mitral Valve - surgery
New England - epidemiology
Registries
Sternum - surgery
Stroke - etiology - mortality
Surgical Wound Infection - etiology - mortality
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Seven percent of the United States population is diabetic. However, diabetics are two to five times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease and therefore populate 30% of open heart procedures in this country. In addition, it has been well documented that diabetic cardiac surgery patients are further disadvantaged with worse outcomes following those procedures. This has been termed the "Diabetic Disadvantage." To benchmark these specific disadvantages, we evaluated the short- and long-term outcomes for diabetics and nondiabetics undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), CABG/valve, and aortic or mitral valve replacement surgery before the broader acceptance and use of intravenous insulin infusions in this patient population in 2001. All such patient records (n = 1,369,961) from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons national database operated on between 1990 and 2000 were assessed for short-term outcomes. Ten-year survival was evaluated among 36,835 patients from the Northern New England Cardiovascular Disease Study Group longitudinal registry. The diabetic population was found to have higher rates of 30-day mortality, deep sternal wound infection, stroke, and longer length of stay than the nondiabetic population. In addition, diabetic patients had approximately two-fold worse 10-year survival. All differences were statistically significant (P
PubMed ID
17395023 View in PubMed
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Effect of peripheral vascular disease on long-term mortality after coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210372
Source
J Insur Med. 1997;29(3):192-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
R J Pokorski
Author Affiliation
Cologne Life Reinsurance Company, Stamford, CT 06905, USA. pokorski@colognere.com
Source
J Insur Med. 1997;29(3):192-4
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - mortality - surgery
Humans
New England - epidemiology
Peripheral Vascular Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
The Northern New England Cardiovascular Disease Study Group examined the effect of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and lower extremity disease (LED) on long-term outcome following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). This article uses data provided by the authors to quantify the mortality implications of progressively more extensive atherosclerosis.
After successful CABG surgery, mortality ratios for patients with CHD + CVD (107%), CHD + LED (171%), and CHD + CVD + LED (195%), respectively, were 1.6 times, 2.5 times, and 2.8 times higher than mortality ratios for patients with CHD only (69%).
The extent of peripheral vascular disease predicted mortality experience even after successful myocardial revascularization.
PubMed ID
10176368 View in PubMed
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New hypothesis for cause of epidemic among native Americans, New England, 1616-1619.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145740
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2010 Feb;16(2):281-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
John S Marr
John T Cathey
Author Affiliation
Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia, USA. jsmarr4@earthlink.net
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2010 Feb;16(2):281-6
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Outbreaks - history
Disease Reservoirs - veterinary
History, 17th Century
Humans
Indians, North American - history
Leptospirosis - history - mortality - veterinary
New England - epidemiology
Rats
Zoonoses - history - transmission
Abstract
In the years before English settlers established the Plymouth colony (1616-1619), most Native Americans living on the southeastern coast of present-day Massachusetts died from a mysterious disease. Classic explanations have included yellow fever, smallpox, and plague. Chickenpox and trichinosis are among more recent proposals. We suggest an additional candidate: leptospirosis complicated by Weil syndrome. Rodent reservoirs from European ships infected indigenous reservoirs and contaminated land and fresh water. Local ecology and high-risk quotidian practices of the native population favored exposure and were not shared by Europeans. Reduction of the population may have been incremental, episodic, and continuous; local customs continuously exposed this population to hyperendemic leptospiral infection over months or years, and only a fraction survived. Previous proposals do not adequately account for signature signs (epistaxis, jaundice) and do not consider customs that may have been instrumental to the near annihilation of Native Americans, which facilitated successful colonization of the Massachusetts Bay area.
Notes
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Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 Mar;10(3):406-1215109405
Cites: Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2008 Feb;102(2):117-2217991499
PubMed ID
20113559 View in PubMed
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Postsurgical mortality in Manitoba and New England.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229087
Source
JAMA. 1990 May 9;263(18):2453-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-9-1990
Author
L L Roos
E S Fisher
S M Sharp
J P Newhouse
G. Anderson
T A Bubolz
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
JAMA. 1990 May 9;263(18):2453-8
Date
May-9-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Hospital Departments - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insurance, Health - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
New England - epidemiology
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Surgical Procedures, Operative - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate
Abstract
Per capita hospital expenditures in the United States exceed those in Canada, but little research has examined differences in outcomes. We used insurance databases to compare postsurgical mortality for 11 specific surgical procedures, both before and after adjustment for case mix, among residents of New England and Manitoba who were over 65 years of age. For low- and moderate-risk procedures, 30-day mortality rates were similar in both regions, but 6-month mortality rates were lower in Manitoba. For the two high-risk procedures, concurrent coronary bypass/valve replacement and hip fracture repair, both 30-day and 6-month mortality rates were lower in New England. Although no consistent pattern favoring New England for cardiovascular surgery was found, the increased mortality following hip fracture in Manitoba was found for all types of repair and all age groups. We conclude that for low- and moderate-risk procedures, the higher hospital expenditures in New England were not associated with lower perioperative mortality rates.
PubMed ID
2329632 View in PubMed
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Salmonella Oranienburg infections associated with fruit salad served in health-care facilities--northeastern United States and Canada, 2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160997
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007 Oct 5;56(39):1025-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-5-2007
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007 Oct 5;56(39):1025-8
Date
Oct-5-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Fruit - microbiology
Health facilities
Humans
New England - epidemiology
Salmonella - genetics - isolation & purification
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
During June-July 2006, a total of 41 culture-confirmed Salmonella serotype Oranienburg infections were diagnosed in persons in 10 northeastern U.S. states and one Canadian province. This report describes the epidemiologic, environmental, and laboratory investigations of this outbreak by federal, state, and local health agencies; the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. The results of the investigations determined that illness was associated with eating fruit salad in health-care facilities. Although the fruit salads were produced by one processing plant, the source of contamination was not determined. This outbreak highlights the importance of laboratory-based surveillance of Salmonella, including molecular subtyping, and timely communication of public health information.
PubMed ID
17914330 View in PubMed
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Short-term mortality after repair of hip fracture. Do Manitoba elderly do worse?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212332
Source
Med Care. 1996 Apr;34(4):310-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
L L Roos
R K Walld
P S Romano
S. Roberecki
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Med Care. 1996 Apr;34(4):310-26
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Female
Femoral Neck Fractures - mortality - surgery
Geriatric Assessment
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
New England - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Postoperative Period
Sex Factors
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
This article uses administrative data from Manitoba and New England to address the reasons underlying Manitoba's relatively high mortality in the 30 days after hip fracture repair. Both the Manitoba and New England data sets are population based, containing information on individuals 65 years of age or older in Manitoba (1979-1992; n = 10,007) and New England (1984-1985); n = 16,206). Various logistic regression models were estimated on pooled and separate data from Manitoba and New England; the models all showed similar predictive accuracy, having C statistics in the .71 to .74 range. Manitoba postsurgical 30-day mortality rates were greater than the 1984 to 1985 New England rate for each of the 14 years considered. In particular, New England residents with very short waits before hip fracture repair (0 or 1 day) had mortality rates both markedly lower than expected and significantly less than those of Manitobians with such short waits. Attention to the Manitoba hospitals with very poor 30-day survival and to the process surrounding selection of patients for early versus late surgery in Manitoba are clearly in order. The extent to which longer-term survival reflects 30-day survival also is discussed. Our findings highlight the utility of comparative data for understanding quality of care problems within a single region.
PubMed ID
8606556 View in PubMed
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SNAP-II and SNAPPE-II: Simplified newborn illness severity and mortality risk scores.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196143
Source
J Pediatr. 2001 Jan;138(1):92-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
D K Richardson
J D Corcoran
G J Escobar
S K Lee
Author Affiliation
Joint Program in Neonatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Source
J Pediatr. 2001 Jan;138(1):92-100
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Apgar score
Birth weight
Calibration
California - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Discriminant Analysis
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Logistic Models
New England - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
ROC Curve
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Illness severity scores for newborns are complex and restricted by birth weight and have dated validations and calibrations. We developed and validated simplified neonatal illness severity and mortality risk scores. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality.
Thirty neonatal intensive care units in Canada, California, and New England collected data on all admissions during the mid 1990s; patients moribund at birth or discharged to normal newborn care in
PubMed ID
11148519 View in PubMed
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Tay-Sachs disease in persons of French-Canadian heritage in northern New England.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215146
Source
Am J Med Genet. 1995 May 8;56(4):409-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-1995
Author
G E Palomaki
J. Williams
J E Haddow
M R Natowicz
Author Affiliation
Foundation for Blood Research, Scarborough, Maine 04070-0190, USA.
Source
Am J Med Genet. 1995 May 8;56(4):409-12
Date
May-8-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Gene Frequency
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
New England - epidemiology
Quebec - ethnology
Tay-Sachs Disease - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Abstract
This study sought to determine whether persons of French-Canadian heritage in northern New England are at high risk for the lethal infantile form of Tay-Sachs disease. In order to accomplish this, death records and laboratory diagnostic records were surveyed to ascertain Tay-Sachs deaths in a cohort of 372,000 live births between 1977-1986. The proportion of the total population with French-Canadian or Jewish heritage was determined from census and birth records, and the ethnic background of Tay-Sachs cases was determined from the corresponding birth records. In 1,860 births, both parents were of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. One of those children was diagnosed with Tay-Sachs disease. In 41,000 births, both parents were of French-Canadian heritage, and in an additional 93,000 births, one parent was of French-Canadian heritage. No cases of Tay-Sachs disease were identified in the offspring of those individuals. Approximately 14 cases (95% confidence interval 8-20) would be expected, if the gene frequency approximated that reported for individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. Based on the results of this study, routine testing for Tay-Sachs disease heterozygosity is not indicated for persons of French-Canadian heritage in northern New England. This conclusion may not necessarily be valid for persons of French-Canadian heritage residing in other states. Further studies of Tay-Sachs disease mutations and prevalence among persons of French-Canadian heritage will be important to determine possible regional variations in gene frequencies.
PubMed ID
7604851 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.