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270 records – page 1 of 27.

[Access of French-speaking elderly to nursing homes among minorities, a linguistic challenge for health and greater welfare].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129806
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Dec;30(4):603-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Eric Forgues
Michel Doucet
Josée Guignard Noël
Author Affiliation
Université de Moncton. eric.forgues@umoncton.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Dec;30(4):603-16
Date
Dec-2011
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Communication Barriers
Health Services Accessibility
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Language
Minority Groups
New Brunswick
Nursing Homes
Abstract
Access to long-term nursing homes by French-speaking seniors in minority situations is a very real problem. However, few studies have been conducted on this subject. We wanted to better understand this issue in New Brunswick while taking into account the language aspect. In this article, we will present the problem based on different issues encountered by Francophones in minority situations and by giving an overview of the studies conducted on French-speaking seniors in minority situations. We will then address the issue related to the rights of French-speaking senior to receive services in French in nursing homes by analyzing briefly the province's legal requirements. Furthermore, we will present the regulatory framework of nursing homes in New Brunswick. Finally, we will provide a geographic analysis of existing New Brunswick nursing homes while taking into account the language aspect, the levels of service and the distribution of French-speaking seniors within the territory.
PubMed ID
22067633 View in PubMed
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[Access to the early diagnosis of dementia in New Brunswick: perceptions of potential users of services depending on the language and the middle of life].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105864
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sarah Pakzad
Jalila Jbilou
Marie-Claire Paulin
Véronique Fontaine
Denise Donovan
Mathieu Bélanger
Paul-Émile Bourque
Author Affiliation
Université de Moncton. sarah.pakzad@umoncton.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S16-20
Date
2013
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Dementia - diagnosis
Early Diagnosis
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Language
Male
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
New Brunswick
Patient satisfaction
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
The early diagnosis of dementia (EDD) enables the identification of reversible causes of dementia and allows the timely implementation of secondary preventive and therapeutic interventions. This study explores New Brunswick seniors' perceptions of the accessibility and availability of EDD services as well as their satisfaction with them while taking into account their language of use and place of residence (urban or rural).
Self-administered survey exploring perceptions of EDD services in Francophone and Anglophone seniors from rural and urban areas of New Brunswick. Univariate and bivariate analyses were carried out.
Of the 157 participants aged 65 years and over who filled out the survey and whose data were analyzed, 84 identified as Francophone, 72 of whom lived in rural areas. Bivariate analyses showed that linguistic groups were comparable with regard to their perceptions of the availability, access to, and satisfaction with EDD services. However, when taking the geographic dimension into account, linguistic intergroup and intragroup disparities were observed, notably in the areas pertaining to the type of services available in the area.
These results suggest that seniors who live in rural areas of New Brunswick are a particularly vulnerable group with perceived limited access to EDD services in their area.
PubMed ID
24300314 View in PubMed
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Active living in communities: understanding the intention to take up physical activity as an everyday way of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216977
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Nov-Dec;85(6):418-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Collette
G. Godin
R. Bradet
N J Gionet
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Québec.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Nov-Dec;85(6):418-21
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Exercise - psychology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
New Brunswick
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify psychosocial factors influencing the intention to incorporate physical activity into daily routine. The subjects were 353 residents from New Brunswick aged 15 to 80 years. The intention to be active was explained by current physical activity habit (beta = 0.563, p
PubMed ID
7895218 View in PubMed
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Adenovirus serotype 14 infection, New Brunswick, Canada, 2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117859
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2013 Jan;19(1):119-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Gabriel Girouard
Richard Garceau
Louise Thibault
Youcef Oussedik
Nathalie Bastien
Yan Li
Author Affiliation
Centre hospitalier universitaire Dr-Georges-L.-Dumont, Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada. gabriel.girouard@vitalitenb.ca
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2013 Jan;19(1):119-22
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenovirus Infections, Human - diagnosis - pathology - virology
Adenoviruses, Human - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Aged
Fatal Outcome
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
New Brunswick
Phylogeny
RNA, Viral - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Serotyping
Abstract
We describe 3 culture-proven cases of adenovirus serotype 14 infection in New Brunswick, Canada, during the summer of 2011. Strains isolated from severely ill patients were closely related to strains of a genomic variant, adenovirus 14p1, circulating in the United States and Ireland. Physicians in Canada should be aware of this emerging adenovirus.
Notes
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2001 Dec;17(12):1244-511751241
Cites: Arch Virol. 2006 Aug;151(8):1587-60216502282
Cites: Virol J. 2009;6:1119171030
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2009 May 15;199(10):1427-3419351259
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2009 May 15;199(10):1419-2619351260
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2009 May 15;199(10):1413-519351263
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2010 Jul 1;202(1):93-10320500088
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2010 Jul 15;202(2):214-2220533881
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2011;16(8). pii: 1980121371411
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2011 Aug;17(8):1402-821801616
PubMed ID
23260201 View in PubMed
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AIDS organization makes appeal for doctors' help through NBMS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232495
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Sep 1;139(5):415
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1988

Air pollution, aeroallergens and cardiorespiratory emergency department visits in Saint John, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196821
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 2000 Sep-Oct;10(5):461-77
Publication Type
Article
Author
D M Stieb
R C Beveridge
J R Brook
M. Smith-Doiron
R T Burnett
R E Dales
S. Beaulieu
S. Judek
A. Mamedov
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON. dave_stieb@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 2000 Sep-Oct;10(5):461-77
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Allergens - adverse effects - isolation & purification
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Humans
New Brunswick - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Seasons
Abstract
Existing studies of the association between air pollution, aeroallergens and emergency department (ED) visits have generally examined the effects of a few pollutants or aeroallergens on individual conditions such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this study, we considered a wide variety of respiratory and cardiac conditions and an extensive set of pollutants and aeroallergens, and utilized prospectively collected information on possible effect modifiers which would not normally be available from purely administrative data. The association between air pollution, aeroallergens and cardiorespiratory ED visits (n = 19,821) was examined for the period 1992 to 1996 using generalized additive models. ED visit, air pollution and aeroallergen time series were prefiltered using LOESS smoothers to minimize temporal confounding, and a parsimonious model was constructed to control for confounding by weather and day of week. Multipollutant and multi-aeroallergen models were constructed using stepwise procedures and sensitivity analyses were conducted by season, diagnosis, and selected individual characteristics or effect modifiers. In single-pollutant models, positive effects of all pollutants but NO2 and COH were observed on asthma visits, and positive effects on all respiratory diagnosis groups were observed for O3, SO2, PM10, PM2.5, and SO4(2-). Among cardiac conditions, only dysrhythmia visits were positively associated with all measures of particulate matter. In the final year-round multipollutant models, a 20.9% increase in cardiac ED visits was attributed to the combination of O3 (16.0%, 95% CI 2.8-30.9) and SO2 (4.9%, 95%CI 1.7-8.2) at the mean concentration of each pollutant. In the final multipollutant model for respiratory visits, O3 accounted for 3.9% of visits (95% CI 0.8-7.2), and SO2 for 3.7% (95% CI 1.5-6.0), whereas a weak, negative association was observed with NO2. In multi-aeroallergen models of warm season asthma ED visits, Ascomycetes, Alternaria and small round fungal spores accounted for 4.5% (95% CI 1.8-7.4), 4.7% (95% CI 1.0-8.6) and 3.0% (95% CI 0.8-5.1), respectively, of visits at their mean concentrations, and these effects were not sensitive to adjustment for air pollution effects. In conclusion, we observed a significant influence of the air pollution mix on cardiac and respiratory ED visits. Although in single-pollutant models, positive associations were noted between ED visits and some measures of particulate matter, in multipollutant models, pollutant gases, particularly ozone, exhibited more consistent effects. Aeroallergens were also significantly associated with warm season asthma ED visits.
PubMed ID
11051536 View in PubMed
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270 records – page 1 of 27.