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181 records – page 1 of 19.

Ability of vaccine strain induced antibodies to neutralize field isolates of caliciviruses from Swedish cats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276779
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2015 Dec 12;57:86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-2015
Author
Jonas Johansson Wensman
Ayman Samman
Anna Lindhe
Jean-Christophe Thibault
Louise Treiberg Berndtsson
Margaret J Hosie
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2015 Dec 12;57:86
Date
Dec-12-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Antibodies, Viral - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Caliciviridae Infections - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Calicivirus, Feline - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Cat Diseases - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Cats - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Neutralization Tests - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Sweden - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Viral Vaccines - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Abstract
Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a common cause of upper respiratory tract disease in cats worldwide. Its characteristically high mutation rate leads to escape from the humoral immune response induced by natural infection and/or vaccination and consequently vaccines are not always effective against field isolates. Thus, there is a need to continuously investigate the ability of FCV vaccine strain-induced antibodies to neutralize field isolates.
Seventy-eight field isolates of FCV isolated during the years 2008-2012 from Swedish cats displaying clinical signs of upper respiratory tract disease were examined in this study. The field isolates were tested for cross-neutralization using a panel of eight anti-sera raised in four pairs of cats following infection with four vaccine strains (F9, 255, G1 and 431).
The anti-sera raised against F9 and 255 neutralised 20.5 and 11.5 %, and 47.4 and 64.1 % of field isolates tested, respectively. The anti-sera against the more recently introduced vaccine strains G1 and 431 neutralized 33.3 and 55.1 % (strain G1) or 69.2 and 89.7 % (strain 431) of the field isolates with titres =5. [corrected]. Dual vaccine strains displayed a higher cross-neutralization.
This study confirms previous observations that more recently introduced vaccine strains induce antibodies with a higher neutralizing capacity compared to vaccine strains that have been used extensively over a long period of time. This study also suggests that dual FCV vaccine strains might neutralize more field isolates compared to single vaccine strains. Vaccine strains should ideally be selected based on updated knowledge on the antigenic properties of field isolates in the local setting, and there is thus a need for continuously studying the evolution of FCV together with the neutralizing capacity of vaccine strain induced antibodies against field isolates at a national and/or regional level.
Notes
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Cites: Vaccine. 1997 Aug-Sep;15(12-13):1451-89302760
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Cites: J Feline Med Surg. 2008 Feb;10(1):32-4017720588
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Cites: Vet Rec. 2008 Sep 20;163(12):355-718806279
Cites: Pol J Vet Sci. 2008;11(4):359-6119227135
Cites: J Feline Med Surg. 2010 Feb;12(2):129-3719836282
Cites: Prev Vet Med. 2011 Sep 1;101(3-4):250-6421705099
Cites: J Virol. 2012 Oct;86(20):11356-6722855496
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Erratum In: Acta Vet Scand. 2016;58:1426888695
PubMed ID
26655039 View in PubMed
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Absence of indigenous specific West Nile virus antibodies in Tyrolean blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134646
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
S T Sonnleitner
J. Simeoni
E. Schmutzhard
M. Niedrig
F. Ploner
H. Schennach
M P Dierich
G. Walder
Author Affiliation
Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Fritz Pregl Straße 1-3/III, Innsbruck, Austria. sissyson@gmx.at
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Blood Donors
Child, Preschool
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Europe
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Neutralization Tests
West Nile Fever - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
West Nile virus - immunology
Abstract
In the last several years, West Nile virus (WNV) was proven to be present especially in the neighboring countries of Austria, such as Italy, Hungary, and the Czech Republic, as well as in eastern parts of Austria, where it was detected in migratory and domestic birds. In summer 2010, infections with WNV were reported from Romania and northern Greece with about 150 diseased and increasingly fatal cases. We tested the sera of 1,607 blood donors from North Tyrol (Austria) and South Tyrol (Italy) for antibodies against WNV by using IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initial results of the ELISA tests showed seroprevalence rates of 46.2% in North Tyrol and 0.5% in South Tyrol, which turned out to be false-positive cross-reactions with antibodies against tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) by adjacent neutralization assays. These results indicate that seropositivity against WNV requires confirmation by neutralization assays, as cross-reactivity with TBEV is frequent and because, currently, WNV is not endemic in the study area.
PubMed ID
21556676 View in PubMed
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Absence of SV40 antibodies or DNA fragments in prediagnostic mesothelioma serum samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78696
Source
Int J Cancer. 2007 Jun 1;120(11):2459-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2007
Author
Kjaerheim Kristina
Røe Oluf Dimitri
Waterboer Tim
Sehr Peter
Rizk Raeda
Dai Hong Yan
Sandeck Helmut
Larsson Erik
Andersen Aage
Boffetta Paolo
Pawlita Michael
Author Affiliation
The Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. kk@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Int J Cancer. 2007 Jun 1;120(11):2459-65
Date
Jun-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Viral - blood
DNA, Neoplasm - blood
Female
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - blood - diagnosis - genetics - immunology
Neutralization Tests
Simian virus 40 - immunology
Abstract
The rhesus monkey virus Simian Virus 40 (SV40) is a member of the polyomavirus family. It was introduced inadvertently to human populations through contaminated polio vaccine during the years 1956-1963, can induce experimental tumors in animals and transform human cells in culture. SV40 DNA has been identified in mesothelioma and other human tumors in some but not all studies. We tested prediagnostic sera from 49 mesothelioma cases and 147 matched controls for antibodies against the viral capsid protein VP1 and the large T antigen of SV40 and of the closely related human polyomaviruses BK and JC, and for SV40 DNA. Cases and controls were identified among donors to the Janus Serum Bank, which was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. Antibodies were analyzed by recently developed multiplex serology based on recombinantly expressed fusions of glutathione-S transferase with viral proteins as antigens combined with fluorescent bead technology. BKV and JCV specific antibodies cross- reactive with SV40 were preabsorbed with the respective VP1 proteins. Sera showing SV40 reactivity after preabsorption with BKV and JCV VP1 were further analyzed in SV40 neutralization assays. SV40 DNA was analyzed by SV40 specific polymerase chain reactions. The odds ratio for being a case when tested positive for SV40 VP1 in the antibody capture assay was 1.5 (95% CI 0.6-3.7) and 2.0 (95% CI 0.6-7.0) when only strongly reactive sera where counted as positive. Although some sera could neutralize SV40, preabsorption with BKV and JCV VP1 showed for all such sera that this neutralizing activity was due to cross-reacting antibodies and did not represent truly SV40-specific antibodies. No viral DNA was found in the sera. No significant association between SV40 antibody response in prediagnostic sera and risk of mesothelioma was seen.
PubMed ID
17315193 View in PubMed
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[Acute enterovirus uveitis in infants]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29564
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2005 May-Jun;50(3):36-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
V A Lashkevich
G A Koroleva
A N Lukashev
E V Denisova
L A Katargina
I P Khoroshilova-Maslova
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2005 May-Jun;50(3):36-45
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Antigens, Viral - immunology
Cataract - etiology
Cross Reactions
Disease Models, Animal
Disease Outbreaks
Echovirus Infections - blood - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
English Abstract
Enterovirus B, Human - genetics - immunology
Epidemiology, Molecular
Eye - virology
Glaucoma - etiology
Humans
Infant
Iris - pathology
Neutralization Tests
Phylogeny
Primates
Pupil Disorders
RNA, Viral - genetics
Russia - epidemiology
Uveitis - blood - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vision Disorders - etiology
Abstract
Enterovirus uveitis (EU) is a new infant eye disease that was first detected and identified in Russia in 1980-1981. Three subtypes of human echoviruses (EV19K, EV11A, and EV11/B) caused 5 nosocomial outbreaks of EU in different Siberian cities and towns in 1980-1989, by affecting more than 750 children mainly below one year of age. Sporadic and focal EU cases (more than 200) were also retrospectively diagnosed in other regions of Russia and in different countries of the former Soviet Union. There were following clinical manifestations: common symptoms of the infection; acute uveitis (rapid focal iridic destruction, pupillary deformities, formation of membranes in the anterior chamber of the eye); and in 15-30% of cases severe complications, cataract, glaucoma, vision impairments. Uveitis strains EV19 and EV11 caused significant uveitis in primates after inoculation into the anterior chamber of the eye, as well as sepsis-like fatal disease with liver necrosis after venous infection. The uveitis strains are phylogenetically and pathogenetically close for primates to strains EV19 and EV11 isolated from young children with sepsis-like disease. The contents of this review have been published in the Reviews in Medical Virology, 2004, vol. 14, p. 241-254.
PubMed ID
16078433 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of severe pneumonia due to respiratory syncytial virus in isolated arctic populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1773
Source
American Journal of Epidemiology. 1975 Mar; 101(3):231-237.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
R E Morrell
M I Marks
R. Champlin
L. Spence
Author Affiliation
McGill University
Source
American Journal of Epidemiology. 1975 Mar; 101(3):231-237.
Date
1975
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Cape Dorset
Igloolik
Hall Lake
Frobisher Bay
Epidemics
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Arctic Regions
Canada
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Microscopy, Electron
Neutralization Tests
Orthomyxoviridae Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Pneumonia, Viral - diagnosis - epidemiology
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses - immunology - isolation & purification
Abstract
A rapidly developing outbreak of pneumonia in young infants was documented in two isolated Artic populations in May 1972. These were studied virologically, serologically and clinically. In addition to the two stricken communities, one apparently unaffected with serious clinical illness and a fourth, in which are located the major hospital and airport in the eastern Arctic, were also studied. One hundred and twenty-four patients were studied serologically and 81 respiratory and other specimens were obtained for virus isolation from 40 of these patients. Clinical records were kept of the outbreak in each area and a detailed questionnaire was filled out for 140 children and their families. Respiratory syncytial irus (RSV) was cultured from eight ill children. Electron microscopy provided the first evidence of RSV infection. A seroconversion rate of approximately 50% was seen in both affected communities as well as in the clinically unaffected one. The epidemic in the first two communities was characterized by severe pneumonia and frequent hospitalization but no cases of bronchiolitis were seen. No evidence for other causes of this outbreak could be obtained by testing for antibodies to influenza A and B, parainfluenza 1, 2 and 3, adenovirus and herpes simplex viruses. Unusual features of this epidemic of RSV infection include the high attack rate, severe morbidity, illness manifest almost exclusively as pneumonia rather than bronchiolitis and the difference between the expression of disease in different communities. Historical data and clinical observations were inadequate to explain these unusual features.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1982.
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Antibodies to arboviruses in an Alaskan population at occupational risk of infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232234
Source
Can J Microbiol. 1988 Nov;34(11):1213-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988
Author
S K Stansfield
C H Calisher
A R Hunt
W G Winkler
Author Affiliation
Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333.
Source
Can J Microbiol. 1988 Nov;34(11):1213-6
Date
Nov-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Arbovirus Infections - epidemiology
Arboviruses - isolation & purification
Complement Fixation Tests
Humans
Neutralization Tests
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Risk factors
Abstract
A total of 435 United States Geological Survey and United States Forest Service workers in Alaska were studied for serologic evidence of past infections with four arboviruses known or suspected to be human pathogens. Of the personnel tested, 36 (8.3%) had the neutralizing antibody to Jamestown Canyon but not snowshoe hare virus, 6 (1.4%) had the antibody to snowshoe hare but not Jamestown Canyon virus, 53 (12.2%) had the antibody to both viruses, 17 (3.9%) had the antibody to Northway virus, and 15 (3.4%) had the antibody to Klamath virus. The indices most significantly correlated with presence of the Jamestown Canyon and snowshoe hare antibodies were the amount of fieldwork (p less than 0.001 for both antibodies) and the duration of employment by the agencies (p less than 0.0001 for Jamestown Canyon and 0.004 for snowshoe hare). The antibody to the four arboviruses also correlated strongly with a history of travel in certain remote or wilderness areas in Alaska (p values ranged from less than 0.001 to 0.086).
PubMed ID
3208197 View in PubMed
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181 records – page 1 of 19.