Skip header and navigation

Refine By

24 records – page 1 of 3.

Arthur Roland Elvidge (1899-1985): contributions to the diagnosis of brain tumors and cerebrovascular disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206931
Source
J Neurosurg. 1998 Jan;88(1):162-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
M C Preul
W. Feindel
T F Dagi
J. Stratford
G. Bertrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Neurosurg. 1998 Jan;88(1):162-71
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Neoplasms - history - radiography - surgery
Canada
Cerebral Angiography - history - instrumentation
Cerebrovascular Disorders - history - radiography - surgery
History, 20th Century
Humans
Neurosurgery - education - history
Neurosurgical Procedures - history
Vascular Surgical Procedures - history
Abstract
The contributions of Arthur Elvidge (1899-1985), Wilder Penfield's first neurosurgical recruit, to the development of neurosurgery have been relatively neglected, although his work in brain tumors extended the previous work of Percival Bailey and Harvey Cushing. He published rigorous correlations of clinical and histological information and formulated a revised, modern nosology for neuroepithelial tumors, including a modern histological definition of glioblastoma multiforme. Well ahead of his time, he believed that glioblastoma was not strictly localized and was the first to comment that the tumor frequently showed "satellitosis." He was the first neurosurgeon in North America to use angiography as a radiographic aid in the diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease. Having studied with Egas Moniz, he was the first to detail the use of angiographic examinations specifically for demonstrating cerebrovascular disorders, believing that it would make possible routine surgery of the intracranial blood vessels. Seeking to visualize all phases of angiography, he was the impetus behind the design of one of the first semi-automatic film changers. Elvidge and Egas Moniz made the first observations on thrombosis of the carotid vessels independently of each other. Elvidge elucidated the significance of embolic stroke and commented on the ischemic sequelae of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Besides his contributions to neurosurgery, he codiscovered the mode of transmission of poliomyelitis. Elvidge's soft-spoken manner, his dry wit and candor, mastery of the understatement, love of exotic travel, and consummate dedication to neurosurgery made him a favorite of patients, neurosurgery residents, nurses, and other hospital staff. His accomplishments and example as teacher and physician have become part of neurosurgery's growing legacy.
PubMed ID
9420095 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Glob Health Action. 2016;9:32016
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016

Carotid endarterectomy results in the early years of practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193347
Source
Surg Neurol. 2001 Jul;56(1):46-9; discussion 49-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
I B Ross
R P Guzman
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Surg Neurol. 2001 Jul;56(1):46-9; discussion 49-51
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carotid Stenosis - mortality - surgery
Cause of Death
Clinical Competence
Curriculum - trends
Endarterectomy, Carotid - mortality
Female
Forecasting
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Neurosurgery - education
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Stroke - mortality
Abstract
Newly qualified surgeons, as well as their referring physicians, are understandably anxious when dangerous surgery is contemplated. Carotid endarterectomy (CEA), which requires a low morbidity/mortality rate to be successful, is especially problematic in this realm. There is a paucity of literature indicating the results that can be expected when a less-experienced surgeon is asked to perform this procedure. As the volume of CEA surgery is expected to decrease in the future with improvements in endovascular techniques, there will be fewer highly experienced CEA surgeons around.
We studied the first consecutive, prospectively recorded 100 CEAs performed by each of two newly qualified surgeons (200 total) between January 1993 and May 1998. Standard technique was used and all cases were done under general anesthesia. The only difference in technique was the more liberal use of shunting and protamine by one individual.
There were no significant differences in the patient demographics between the two surgeons. Seventy-five percent of the cases harbored symptomatic stenoses. An overall combined stroke/mortality rate of 5.5% was observed. The rate in those operated on for symptomatic stenosis (n = 150) was 6% while it was 4% for those with asymptomatic pathology. There were no significant differences in outcome between the two surgeons. The average stroke/mortality rate in the first 50 cases for each surgeon was 7%, as opposed to 4% for the second 50 cases.
These data indicate that less-experienced individuals can perform this procedure with good results.
Notes
Comment In: Surg Neurol. 2001 Jul;56(1):6611546583
PubMed ID
11546575 View in PubMed
Less detail

The crucial decade: modern neurosurgery's definitive development in Harvey Cushing's early research and practice, 1900 to 1910.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207070
Source
J Neurosurg. 1997 Dec;87(6):964-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
S H Greenblatt
Author Affiliation
Brown University Program in Neurosurgery, Memorial Hospital, Pawtucket, Rhode Island 02860, USA.
Source
J Neurosurg. 1997 Dec;87(6):964-71
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Neoplasms - history - surgery
Canada
History, 20th Century
Humans
Intracranial Pressure - physiology
Medical Laboratory Science - history
Neurosurgery - education - history
Referral and Consultation - history
Survival Rate
United States
Abstract
When Harvey Cushing announced his full-time commitment to neurological surgery in 1904, it was a discouraging and discouraged enterprise. Other surgeons' mortality rates for patients with brain tumors were 30 to 50%. By 1910 Cushing had operated on 180 tumors; he had a thriving practice, with a patient mortality rate of less than 13%. The three essential ingredients of his success were: 1) a new surgical conceptualization of intracranial pressure (ICP); 2) technical innovations for controlling ICP; and 3) establishment of a large referral base. In the years 1901 through 1905, the implications of his research on the "Cushing reflex" were quickly translated into surgical techniques for controlling ICP. In the period between 1906 and 1910, Cushing built up his referral practice by publishing widely, and especially by lecturing to medical audiences throughout the United States and Canada. His scientific work on ICP was essential to his clinical success, but without his professional and social ability to build a thriving practice, there would have been insufficient material for him to use to improve his approaches.
PubMed ID
9384414 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Decentralized neurotraumatology--broader and more purposeful education].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252085
Source
Lakartidningen. 1975 Jul 2;72(27):2827-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2-1975

Formative evaluation of a World Wide Web-based Chiari malformation hypermedia program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209747
Source
J Biocommun. 1997;24(4):22-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
B. Hough
Author Affiliation
Nkaos, Inc., Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Biocommun. 1997;24(4):22-32
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arnold-Chiari Malformation
Color
Computer Communication Networks
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Consumer Satisfaction
Data Display
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Hypermedia
Internship and Residency
Neurosurgery - education
Ontario
Questionnaires
Software Design
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
The interface design of a Chiari malformation hypermedia document was tested with formative evaluation, a type of usability testing. The evaluation tested six common interactive design features essential for the design of user-friendly interfaces: image, size, label highlighting, text presentation (scrolling vs. hyperlinks), color (text, visual material, and background), and button behavior. Six neurosurgical residents answered a questionnaire focusing on these interactive design features during the development of the hypermedia document. Over a period of two months, the responses to the questions and suggestions made by the volunteers were used to improve the six interactive design features for the specific target audience of Toronto Hospital, Western Division neurosurgical residents.
PubMed ID
9494876 View in PubMed
Less detail

How many neurosurgeons do we want to educate in Europe annually? The Danish proposal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210006
Source
Acta Neurochir Suppl. 1997;69:40-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
F. Gjerris
F F Madsen
Author Affiliation
University Clinic of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Neurochir Suppl. 1997;69:40-2
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Forecasting
Health planning - trends
Health Planning Guidelines
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Internship and Residency - manpower
Medical Staff, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neurosurgery - education
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The neurosurgical population consists of professors, consultants, specialised senior registrars, and doctors in training (senior registrars, trainees and young doctors to be educated as neurosurgeons). Knowing number and size of the neurosurgical departments in each European country, the number of staff members, the politics of retirement (age, educational level) and the age of every neurosurgeon it is possible to calculate the exact number of trainees needed per year to maintain a state of balance in every single European country. With Denmark as a model we based our assessments partly on a simple calculation model of the exact annual number of neurosurgical trainees or senior registrars and partly used an actuary flow model for calculation. In Denmark with 5 neurosurgical departments, 5.2 mill. population and a retirement age of 70, we have an average of 1-2 newcomers per year and maintain a bulk of 10 senior registrars in education. Thus there will be a balance between intake of newcomers and retirement, of course with some unknown factors as unforeseen dismissal or resignation, death rate among neurosurgeons and transfer to private practice.
PubMed ID
9253438 View in PubMed
Less detail

The integration of pediatric neurosurgery into the Danish health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216487
Source
Childs Nerv Syst. 1995 Jan;11(1):61-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
J. Haase
F. Gjerris
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Aalborg Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Childs Nerv Syst. 1995 Jan;11(1):61-2
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Health Services - standards
Health Services Administration
Humans
Neurosurgery - education - trends
Pediatrics
PubMed ID
7712509 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lessons learned by personal failures in aneurysm surgery: what went wrong, and why?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95172
Source
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2009 Sep;151(9):1013-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Wester Knut
Author Affiliation
Section for Neurosurgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen, 5021, Bergen, Norway. knut.gustav.wester@helse-bergen.no
Source
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2009 Sep;151(9):1013-24
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carotid Artery, Internal - pathology - surgery
Cerebrovascular Disorders - etiology
Female
Humans
Iatrogenic Disease - epidemiology - prevention & control
Intracranial Aneurysm - pathology - radiography - surgery
Intraoperative Complications - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Middle Cerebral Artery - pathology - surgery
Neurosurgery - education
Neurosurgical Procedures - adverse effects - mortality
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Postoperative Hemorrhage - mortality - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - mortality - prevention & control
Teaching - standards
Treatment Failure
Vascular Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - mortality
Young Adult
Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyse the intraoperative complications of a single neurosurgeon, with emphasis on devastating intraoperative incidents, and how they possibly could have been avoided. METHODS: All the patients operated upon by the author between 1986 and 2002, i.e. 252 patients with 270 craniotomies for 294 aneurysms, were included. All intraoperative events that possibly could have influenced the clinical outcome were recorded prospectively. RESULTS: A total of 16 cases (6.3% of all the patients) with serious intraoperative incidents were identified. In 11 cases (3.6% of all aneurysms), an intraoperative rupture occurred that was judged to have had mild to severe consequences for the patient. In another four patients (1.6% of all patients), all with unruptured, large aneurysms (>15 mm) of the carotid or middle cerebral arteries, a major vessel occlusion occurred inadvertently. In one patient with a large, unruptured MCA aneurysm, a clip slipped after the closure of the wound, causing a fatal intracerebral haemorrhage. These events had a severe impact on the clinical outcome. In retrospect, most of these incidents could, and should have, been avoided. CONCLUSIONS: It is recommended to start the training of new aneurysm surgeons on patients with small, supratentorial, unruptured aneurysms, followed by ruptured aneurysms in all other supratentorial locations than the anterior communicating artery (ACOM), which is the supratentorial location that should be the last step in the training of independent aneurysm surgeons.
PubMed ID
19609480 View in PubMed
Less detail

24 records – page 1 of 3.