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107 records – page 1 of 11.

Above-average intelligence and neuropsychological test score performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200784
Source
Int J Neurosci. 1999 Aug;99(1-4):221-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
A M Horton
Author Affiliation
Psych Associates, Towson, Maryland, USA. drmachorton@hotmail.com
Source
Int J Neurosci. 1999 Aug;99(1-4):221-31
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Intelligence
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Wechsler Scales - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Recent studies regarding the effects of above average intelligence and neuropsychological performance have been mixed with Dodrill (1977) suggesting that above-average performances on neuropsychological test scores should not be expected when intellectual abilities are above average and Tremont, Hoffman, Scott and Adams (in press) clearly suggesting better neuropsychological skills in the higher IQ group. This paper described a reanalysis of a previously presented Canadian data-set assembled by Pauker (1980) of three hundred and sixty-three persons (152 males, 211 females) who were administered the core tests of the Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Test Battery (HRNTB) and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). The results were that subjects with higher intelligence had better neuropsychological test score performances except for the Finger Tapping with the dominant hand test.
PubMed ID
10495218 View in PubMed
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Acceptability and concurrent validity of measures to predict older driver involvement in motor vehicle crashes: an Emergency Department pilot case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161383
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2007 Sep;39(5):1056-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Frank J Molnar
Shawn C Marshall
Malcolm Man-Son-Hing
Keith G Wilson
Anna M Byszewski
Ian Stiell
Author Affiliation
CanDRIVE(1): a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Institute of Aging funded New Emerging Team, Elisabeth-Bruyère Research Institute, 43 Bruyère Street, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 5C8. fmolnar@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2007 Sep;39(5):1056-63
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Automobile Driver Examination - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Head Movements
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Motor Skills
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Psychomotor Performance
Questionnaires
Reaction Time
Risk
Visual Fields
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Older drivers have one of the highest motor vehicle crash (MVC) rates per kilometer driven, largely due to the functional effects of the accumulation, and progression of age-associated medical conditions that eventually impact on fitness-to-drive. Consequently, physicians in many jurisdictions are legally mandated to report to licensing authorities patients who are judged to be medically at risk for MVCs. Unfortunately, physicians lack evidence-based tools to assess the fitness-to-drive of their older patients. This paper reports on a pilot study that examines the acceptability and association with MVC of components of a comprehensive clinical assessment battery.
To evaluate the acceptability to participants of components of a comprehensive assessment battery, and to explore potential predictors of MVC that can be employed in front-line clinical settings.
Case-control study of 10 older drivers presenting to a tertiary care hospital emergency department after involvement in an MVC and 20 age-matched controls.
The measures tested were generally found to be acceptable to participants. Positive associations (p
PubMed ID
17854579 View in PubMed
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The adaptation of an adult group screening test for dyslexia into Finland-Swedish: normative data for university students and the effects of language background on test performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84750
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Oct;48(5):419-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Lindgrén Signe-Anita
Laine Matti
Author Affiliation
Abo Akademi University, Turku, Finland. signe-anita.lindgren@abo.fi
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Oct;48(5):419-32
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Cultural Characteristics
Dyslexia - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Language
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Memory
Multilingualism
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Phonetics
ROC Curve
Self Disclosure
Students - psychology
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Vocabulary
Abstract
We present a Finland-Swedish adaptation of the Sweden-Swedish group screening test for dyslexia for adults and young adults DUVAN (Lundberg & Wolff, 2003) together with normative data from 143 Finland-Swedish university students. The test is based on the widely held phonological deficit hypothesis of dyslexia and consists of a self-report and five subtests tapping phonological working memory, phonological representation, phonological awareness, and orthographic skill. We describe the test adaptation procedure and show that the internal reliability of the new test version is comparable to the original one. Our results indicate that the language background (Swedish, Finnish, early simultaneous Swedish-Finnish bilingualism) should be taken into account when interpreting the results on the Finland-Swedish DUVAN test. We show that the FS-DUVAN differentiates a group of students with dyslexia diagnosis from normals, and that a low performance on the FS-DUVAN correlates with a positive self-report on familial dyslexia and with a history of special education in school. Finally, we analyze the sensitivity and specificity of the FS-DUVAN for dyslexia among university students.
PubMed ID
17877557 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-related dementia in the institutionalized elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216856
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1994 Dec;18(6):1330-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
P L Carlen
M P McAndrews
R T Weiss
M. Dongier
J M Hill
E. Menzano
K. Farcnik
J. Abarbanel
M R Eastwood
Author Affiliation
Neuropharmacology Program, Toronto Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1994 Dec;18(6):1330-4
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alzheimer Disease - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Dementia, Vascular - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Incidence
Institutionalization - statistics & numerical data
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Psychometrics
Psychoses, Alcoholic - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
This study examined the distribution of alcohol-related and other dementias in a sample of 130 cognitively impaired residents of long-term care facilities in a Northern Ontario community. Study procedures entailed standardized psychiatric, neurological, and neuropsychological evaluations. Diagnoses of dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) and vascular dementia were based on criteria of the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association. The diagnosis of alcohol-related dementia (ARD) was based on extensive review of medical history to assess before alcohol abuse and stabilization or improvement in cognitive functioning following institutionalization in conjunction with no other identifiable cause of dementia. ARD comprised 24% of this population compared with DAT (35%), vascular dementia (19%), and other causes (22%). The ARD group was, on average, 10 years younger than the other groups. It had nearly twice the average length of institutionalization and had milder cognitive impairment on both clinical ratings and neuropsychological tests. A diagnosis of ARD was present in the medical records for only 25% of patients in this group. These findings suggest that ARD may be more common than previously suspected in the distribution of dementias in long-term care facilities.
PubMed ID
7695026 View in PubMed
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Altered prefrontal brain activity in persons at risk for Alzheimer's disease: an fMRI study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182811
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2003 Jun;15(2):121-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Eva Elgh
Anne Larsson
Sture Eriksson
Lars Nyberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. eva.elgh@germed.umu.se
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2003 Jun;15(2):121-33
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - physiopathology
Brain Mapping
Dominance, Cerebral - physiology
Female
Frontal Lobe - physiopathology
Gyrus Cinguli - physiopathology
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Mass Screening
Memory Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Occipital Lobe - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Prefrontal Cortex - physiopathology
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is critical for adequate treatment and care. Recently it has been shown that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be important in preclinical detection of AD. The purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in memory-related brain activation between persons with high versus low risk for AD. This was achieved by combining a validated neurocognitive screening battery (the 7-minutes test) with memory assessment and fMRI.
One hundred two healthy community-living persons with subjective memory complaints were recruited through advertisement and tested with the 7-minutes test. Based on their test performance they were classified as having either high (n = 8) or low risk (n = 94) for AD. Six high-risk individuals and six age-, sex-, and education-matched low-risk individuals were investigated with fMRI while engaged in episodic memory tasks.
The high-risk individuals performed worse than low-risk individuals on tests of episodic memory. Patterns of brain activity during episodic encoding and retrieval showed significant group differences (p
PubMed ID
14620071 View in PubMed
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Alzheimer disease-like clinical phenotype in a family with FTDP-17 caused by a MAPT R406W mutation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86943
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2008 Apr;15(4):377-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Lindquist S G
Holm I E
Schwartz M.
Law I.
Stokholm J.
Batbayli M.
Waldemar G.
Nielsen J E
Author Affiliation
Memory Disorders Research Group, The Neuroscience Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. granhojlindquist@gmail.com
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2008 Apr;15(4):377-85
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - complications - genetics - pathology - radionuclide imaging
Amyloid beta-Protein - metabolism
Arginine - genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17
Dementia - complications
Denmark
Deoxyglucose - metabolism
Family Health
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation - genetics
Neurofibrillary Tangles - metabolism
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Peptide Fragments - metabolism
Phenotype
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Tryptophan - genetics
tau Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
We report clinical, molecular, neuroimaging and neuropathological features of a Danish family with autosomal dominant inherited dementia, a clinical phenotype resembling Alzheimer's disease and a pathogenic mutation (R406W) in the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. Pre-symptomatic and affected family members underwent multidisciplinary (clinical, molecular, neuroimaging and neuropathological) examinations. Treatment with memantine in a family member with early symptoms, based on the clinical phenotype and the lack of specific treatment, appears to stabilize the disease course and increase the glucose metabolism in cortical and subcortical areas, as determined by serial [F(18)]FDG-PET scanning before and after initiation of treatment. Neuropathological examination of a second affected and mutation-positive family member showed moderate atrophy of the temporal lobes including the hippocampi. Microscopy revealed abundant numbers of tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles in all cortical areas and in some brainstem nuclei corresponding to a diagnosis of frontotemporal lobe degeneration on the basis of a MAPT mutation. The clinical and genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant inherited dementia must be taken into account in the genetic counselling and genetic testing of families with autosomal dominantly inherited dementia in general.
PubMed ID
18284428 View in PubMed
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Are negative mood states associated with cognitive function in newly diagnosed patients with epilepsy?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198958
Source
Epilepsia. 2000 Apr;41(4):421-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
V. Pulliainen
P. Kuikka
H. Kalska
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Central Hospital of Päijät-Häme, Lahti, Finland. veijo.pulliainen@phks.fi
Source
Epilepsia. 2000 Apr;41(4):421-5
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Epilepsy - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Personality Inventory
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychomotor Performance
Abstract
The association of self-reported subclinical depressive symptoms and negative mood states with cognitive functioning was evaluated in 51 consecutive newly diagnosed adult persons with epilepsy.
Emotional state was assessed with Profile of Mood States (POMS) and Brief Depression Scale (BDS) and was correlated with a battery of neuropsychological tests.
Patients with epilepsy reported more depressive symptoms in BDS than in controls. They also had more feeling of bewilderment and less vigor on POMS. Higher scores in BDS and in POMS inefficiency scale were associated with slower nondominant hand tapping, but emotional state did not correlate with cognitive measures within the epilepsy group.
Self-reported symptoms of depression and negative mood states were not extensively or significantly associated with cognitive function, and they do not explain the cognitive impairments observed in cognition in newly diagnosed patients with epilepsy.
PubMed ID
10756407 View in PubMed
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Assessment practices of clinical neuropsychologists in the United States and Canada: a survey of INS, NAN, and APA Division 40 members.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176840
Source
Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 2005 Jan;20(1):33-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Laura A Rabin
William B Barr
Leslie A Burton
Author Affiliation
Dartmouth Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, One Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA.
Source
Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 2005 Jan;20(1):33-65
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain Damage, Chronic - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada
Child
Data Collection
Humans
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Neuropsychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Societies, Scientific
United States
Wechsler Scales - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The present study surveyed assessment practices and test usage patterns among clinical neuropsychologists. Respondents were 747 North American, doctorate-level psychologists (40% usable response rate) affiliated with Division 40 of the American Psychological Association (APA), the National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN), or the International Neuropsychological Society (INS). Respondents first provided basic demographic and practice-related information and reported their most frequently utilized instruments. Overall, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales and Wechsler Memory Scales were most frequently used, followed by the Trail Making Test, California Verbal Learning Test, and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children. Respondents also reviewed a vignette about a traumatic brain injury patient, and then reported the instruments they would use to assess this patient's specific cognitive symptomatology, general cognitive ability, and capacity to return to work. Particular attention was paid to the areas of memory, attention, and executive functioning. The current study represents the largest and most comprehensive test usage survey conducted to date within the field of clinical neuropsychology. Survey results update and greatly expand knowledge about neuropsychologists' assessment practices. Following a review of findings, results are compared to those obtained in prior surveys and implications for the field of neuropsychology are discussed.
PubMed ID
15620813 View in PubMed
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The association between depressive and cognitive symptoms in amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157844
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2008 Aug;20(4):710-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Carol Hudon
Sylvie Belleville
Serge Gauthier
Author Affiliation
Ecole de Psychologie, Université Laval, Québec, Canada. carol.hudon@psy.ulaval.ca
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2008 Aug;20(4):710-23
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Amnesia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attention
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Inhibition (Psychology)
Male
Mass Screening
Memory, Short-Term
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Problem Solving
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Reproducibility of Results
Retention (Psychology)
Verbal Learning
Abstract
Depressive symptoms are frequently observed in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, little is known regarding the cognitive characteristics of this important subgroup.
We examined executive functions (controlled inhibition) and verbal episodic memory in 33 healthy older adults (control group), 18 older adults with amnestic MCI plus subclinical depressive symptoms (a-MCI/D+ group), and 26 older adults with amnestic MCI but no depressive symptoms (a-MCI group).
Compared to the a-MCI and control groups, patients with a-MCI/D+ showed poor controlled inhibition. Moreover, in verbal episodic memory these patients recalled fewer words than control participants on immediate free, delayed free, and delayed total (free plus cued) recall. Performance on immediate recall suggested a self-retrieval deficit, but delayed performance also revealed the existence of an encoding impairment. In the a-MCI group, participants exhibited normal performance on the executive task, but pervasive memory impairment; the memory deficit concerned free and total recall on both immediate and delayed tasks, suggesting the existence of encoding and self-retrieval disturbances.
This study reveals differences between the pattern of cognitive impairment for a-MCI/D+ and a-MCI subgroups particularly at the level of executive capacities. In terms of memory functioning, the differences between the subgroups were more subtle; more studies are needed in order to better characterize the memory impairment of a-MCI/D+ and a-MCI patients.
PubMed ID
18397547 View in PubMed
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Association between satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations after stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285730
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2017 Sep;24(5):339-348
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Aileen Bergström
Susanne Guidetti
Kerstin Tham
Gunilla Eriksson
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2017 Sep;24(5):339-348
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Occupational therapy
Personal Satisfaction
Social Participation
Stroke rehabilitation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Within occupational therapy, it is assumed that individuals are satisfied when participating in everyday occupations that they want to do. However, there is little empirical evidence to show this.
The aim of this study is to explore and describe the relation between satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations in a Swedish cohort, 5 years post stroke.
Sixty-nine persons responded to the Occupational Gaps Questionnaire (OGQ). The questionnaire measures subjective restrictions in participation, i.e. the discrepancy between doing and wanting to do 30 different occupations in everyday life, and satisfaction per activity. Results were analysed with McNemar/chi-square.
Seventy percent of the persons perceived participation restrictions. Individuals that did not perceive restrictions in their participation had a significantly higher level of satisfaction (p?=?.002) compared to those that had restrictions. Participants that performed activities that they wanted to do report between 79 and 100% satisfaction per activity.
In this cohort, there was a significant association between satisfaction and participating in everyday occupations one wants to do, showing that satisfaction is an important aspect of participation and substantiates a basic assumption within occupational therapy. The complexity of measuring satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations is discussed.
PubMed ID
27774829 View in PubMed
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107 records – page 1 of 11.