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1011 records – page 1 of 102.

Cognitive structure of writing disorders in Russian: what would Luria say?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123268
Source
Behav Neurol. 2012;25(3):223-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Elena Kozintseva
Anatoly Skvortsov
Anastasia Ulicheva
Anna Vlasova Zaykova
Author Affiliation
The National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Behav Neurol. 2012;25(3):223-32
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agraphia - physiopathology
Cognition Disorders - physiopathology
Humans
Neuropsychological Tests
Russia
Writing
Abstract
Acquired disorders of writing in the Russian language have been reported for more than a century. The study of these disorders reflects the history of Russian neuropsychology and is dominated by the syndrome approach most notably by the writings of Luria. Indeed, our understanding of acquired dysgraphia in Russian speakers is conceptualized according to the classical approach in Modern Russia. In this review, we describe the classical approach and compare it to the cognitive neuropsychological models of writing disorders that are developed to explain dysgraphia in English and in other Western European languages. We argue that the basic theoretical assumptions of the two approaches - cognitive and classical or syndrome approach - share similarities. It is therefore proposed that identification of acquired cases of dysgraphia in Russian could potentially benefit from taking the cognitive neuropsychological perspective. We also conclude that adopting elements of the syndrome approach would substantially enrich the understanding of acquired dysgraphia since these offer an insight into processes not described in the cognitive neuropsychological approach.
PubMed ID
22713406 View in PubMed
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Development and validation of a demographic correction system for neuropsychological measures used in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211350
Source
J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 1996 Aug;18(4):479-616
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
H. Tuokko
T S Woodward
Author Affiliation
Centre on Aging, University of Victoria, Canada.
Source
J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 1996 Aug;18(4):479-616
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - psychology
Canada
Female
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Reproducibility of Results
PubMed ID
8877629 View in PubMed
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[Functional state of the autonomous nervous system and school readiness in mono- and bilingual children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92214
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2008;54(3):74-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Tsiapets' H B
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2008;54(3):74-80
Date
2008
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Autonomic Nervous System - physiology
Child
Electrocardiography
Humans
Multilingualism
Neuropsychological Tests
Students - psychology
Abstract
Heart rate variability and school readiness by Kern-Jerasick test were determined in mono- and bilingual children. Bilinguals in the beginning of school year had better adaptational reserve than monolingual fellows. High school readiness correlates with higher adaptational reserve determined by PARS. CONCLUSION: Timely adequate preparation to school is necessary to provide easier adaptation and reduction of stress to physiological norm.
PubMed ID
18763583 View in PubMed
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Russian-American collaboration. Neurodevelopmental pediatric research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219142
Source
Va Med Q. 1994;121(2):86-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
T R Montgomery
Author Affiliation
Division of Developmental Disabilities, Children's Hospital of the King's Daughters, Norfolk, VA 23501-1971.
Source
Va Med Q. 1994;121(2):86-8
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Development
Humans
Infant
International Educational Exchange
Moscow
Neuropsychological Tests
Pediatrics
Research
Virginia
PubMed ID
8199214 View in PubMed
Less detail

Predicting the risk of dementia among Canadian seniors: a useable practice-friendly diagnostic algorithm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127222
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2013 Jan-Mar;27(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Xiangfei Meng
Carl D'Arcy
Debra Morgan
Darrell D Mousseau
Author Affiliation
Box 92 RUH, 103 Hospital Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0W8, Canada. xim443@mail.usask.ca
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2013 Jan-Mar;27(1):23-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Algorithms
Canada
Dementia - diagnosis
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk factors
Abstract
Research has not provided feasible models to identify dementia in primary care. We construct a broadly based diagnostic algorithm synthesizing information from known risk factors, such as poor cognition, sociodemographic factors, and health history. Data were from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA) Phase I. Dementia was diagnosed by clinical consensus. All subjects had a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score and a Modified MMSE (3MS) score. Multiple logistic regression was used to build our diagnostic algorithm, which was then tested for classification accuracy on the basis of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve for our diagnostic algorithm using 3MS as a binary variable was significantly greater than the 3MS alone (P
PubMed ID
22314248 View in PubMed
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Delirium episode as a sign of undetected dementia among community dwelling elderly subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194203
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2001 Jun;70(6):821
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001

Bilingualism and performance on two widely used developmental neuropsychological test batteries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269568
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(4):e0125867
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Linda C Karlsson
Anna Soveri
Pekka Räsänen
Antti Kärnä
Sonia Delatte
Emma Lagerström
Lena Mård
Mikaela Steffansson
Minna Lehtonen
Matti Laine
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(4):e0125867
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cognition - physiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Intelligence Tests
Male
Multilingualism
Neuropsychological Tests
Sweden
Wechsler Scales
Abstract
The present study investigated the effect of bilingualism on the two widely used developmental neuropsychological test batteries Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) and A Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment, Second Edition (NEPSY-II) in children. The sample consisted of 100 Finland-Swedish children in two age groups. About half (n = 52) of the participants were early simultaneous bilinguals, and the other half (n = 48) were monolinguals. As no Finland-Swedish versions of the tests are available at the moment, both tests were translated and adapted to suit this population. The results revealed no difference in the performance between bilingual and monolingual children. This speaks against a cognitive advantage in bilingual children and indicates that development of separate norms for monolingual and bilingual children is not needed for clinical use.
Notes
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Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2012 Sep;101(9):946-5222591054
Cites: J Exp Child Psychol. 2013 Feb;114(2):187-20223059128
Cites: Cogn Psychol. 2013 Mar;66(2):232-5823370226
Cites: Psychon Bull Rev. 2014 Apr;21(2):520-524092496
Cites: Exp Psychol. 2014;61(3):234-5124217139
Cites: Psychol Sci. 2015 Jan;26(1):99-10725475825
PubMed ID
25922937 View in PubMed
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Self-reported symptoms and neuropsychological function among tunnel workers previously exposed to acrylamide and N-methylolacrylamide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141254
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2011 Mar;37(2):136-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Lars Ole Goffeng
Monica Alvestrand
Bente Ulvestad
Kjell Aage Sørensen
Vidar Skaug
Helge Kjuus
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology, National Institute of Occupational Health, PO Box 8149 Dep, NO-0033 Oslo, Norway. Lars.Goffeng@stami.no
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2011 Mar;37(2):136-46
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - toxicity
Acrylamides - toxicity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway
Occupational Exposure
Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine possible exposure-related symptoms and neuropsychological changes among tunnel workers previously exposed to grout containing acrylamide and N-methylolacrylamide.
In a cross sectional study, 44 male tunnel workers previously exposed to acrylamide and N-methylolacrylamide during grouting operations were exam-in-ed with neuropsychological tests, 2-10 years after last exposure. The control group consisted of 49 male tunnel workers with no history of acrylamide exposure. Questionnaires were used to assess retrospectively recalled symptoms during work and current symptoms at the time of the examination.
The prevalence of paresthesia in hands and legs, and leg cramps during work peri-ods were higher in the exposed than control group. Self-reported prevalence of skin irritation, peeling of skin on the hands, white-finger attacks, headache, and breathlessness was also higher among the exposed workers. The Q-16 questionnaire on current symptoms indicated higher symptom prevalence among the exposed of impaired memory and concentration, emotional change, sleep disturbances, tiredness, headache, and sensory or motor changes. In contrast, no association was found between neuropsychological test results and acrylamide exposure, adjusting for relevant confounders. However, selected motor symptoms were associated with the corresponding results on tests for motor function.
Despite higher prevalences of self-reported current symptoms among the acrylamide-exposed compared to the control group, we did not find an association between occupational acrylamide exposure and health out-comes as measured by the chosen neuropsychological tests. Observed associations between chemical exposure and self-reported symptoms should be interpreted with great caution.
PubMed ID
20740266 View in PubMed
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Even cognitively well-functioning adults are unaware of their olfactory dysfunction: Implications for ENT clinicians and researchers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265390
Source
Rhinology. 2015 Mar;53(1):89-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Eike Wehling
Astri J Lundervold
Thomas Espeset
Ivar Reinvang
Annika Bramerson
Steven Nordin
Source
Rhinology. 2015 Mar;53(1):89-94
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Awareness
Cognition - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway
Olfaction Disorders - physiopathology
Abstract
Past findings of an impact of cognitive impairment on awareness of olfactory dysfunction, and high prevalence of age-associated cognitive impairment motivated the present study of whether middle-aged and elderly adults are unaware of an olfactory dysfunction despite being carefully screened for cognitive impairment.
The sample included 203 Norwegian participants, aged 46-79 years, 134 women and 69 men, who underwent comprehensive neuropsychological assessment for screening of cognitive impairment. Subjective assessment of olfactory function ("How would you estimate your sense of smell?") was compared with outcome on objective assessment of olfactory function with the Scandinavian Odor Identification Test, which in the present study was shown to be valid for use on Norwegian populations.
We found that 79% of this cognitively healthy sample with objectively assessed olfactory dysfunction reported normal olfactory function (57% of functionally anosmics reported normal function). In contrast, only 9% with objectively assessed normal olfactory function reported olfactory dysfunction.
A large proportion of cognitively well-functioning middle-aged and elderly adults with an olfactory dysfunction are unaware of their dysfunction. The ENT physician who suspects that the sense of smell may be compromised should, in addition to an anamnesis, assess the patient`s olfactory function objectively.
PubMed ID
25756084 View in PubMed
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[Etiology of ADHD/hyperkinetic disorder--a review]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29508
Source
Laeknabladid. 2005 May;91(5):409-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Margrét Valdimarsdóttir
Agnes Huld Hrafnsdóttir
Páll Magnússon
Olafur O Guethmundsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psyciatry, Iceland University Hospital, Dalbraut 3, 104 Reykjavik, Iceland. margval@lsh.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2005 May;91(5):409-14
Date
May-2005
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - etiology
English Abstract
Humans
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Hyperkinetic disorder or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a developmental syndrome that affects approximately 7% of children and can sustain into adulthood. In this review current research on the etiology of the syndrome is reviewed.
PubMed ID
16131724 View in PubMed
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1011 records – page 1 of 102.