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Child neuromuscular disease in southern Norway. Prevalence, age and distribution of diagnosis with special reference to "non-Duchenne muscular dystrophy".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38414
Source
Clin Genet. 1988 Sep;34(3):145-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1988
Author
S E Tangsrud
S. Halvorsen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Ullevaal Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Clin Genet. 1988 Sep;34(3):145-52
Date
Sep-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Muscular Dystrophies - epidemiology - genetics
Neuromuscular Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Norway
Spinal Muscular Atrophies of Childhood - etiology - genetics
Abstract
The prevalence of child neuromuscular disease in Southern Norway by January 1st, 1983, was studied by collecting data from all available sources. All children born 1. 1. 1965 or later were included in the study. The total group consisted of 110 patients from 17 different diagnostic categories. Total prevalence on this group was found to be 24.9 X 10(5). Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), with a prevalence of 10.89 X 10(5) constituted 29.2% of the total material. In the spinal muscle atrophy group (SMA), we found a significant increase in the number of boys affected, although an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance was found likely in all probands. Prevalence figures of child neuromuscular disease are hard to compare, as most studies deal with an adult population. The prevalences of common and well-known large categories of neuromuscular diseases in childhood are in agreement with previous studies. For less well known and mild diseases, our figures are low. This may be due in part to a later onset and in part to a health system not sensitive to parents' complaints.
PubMed ID
3263224 View in PubMed
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Chiropractic patients in Denmark: a short description of basic characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31595
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2002 Mar-Apr;25(3):162-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jan Hartvigsen
Line P Sorensen
Kristian Graesborg
Niels Grunnet-Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Odense, Denmark. j.hartvigsen@nikkb.dk
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2002 Mar-Apr;25(3):162-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Chiropractic - standards - statistics & numerical data
Chronic Disease
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - epidemiology - therapy
Neuromuscular Diseases - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The vast majority of information on chiropractic and chiropractic patients originates from English-speaking countries. Lately, however, reports describing chiropractic patients and practice in other European countries have emerged. OBJECTIVE: To describe basic characteristics of Danish chiropractic patients. DESIGN: Survey questionnaire. All chiropractic clinics in Denmark were asked to collect information on new patients during 1 randomly assigned week in 1999. SETTING: Private chiropractic practice and a nonprofit research institution. OUTCOME MEASURES: Age and sex, location and duration of chief complaint, pain intensity, limitation of activities of daily living from chief complaint, and mode of referral. RESULTS: Eighty-eight percent of all chiropractic clinics in Denmark participated in the study. Out of 2020 patients from the participating clinics, 1897 (94%) filled out a self-administered questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 42 years, and slightly more women than men returned the questionnaire. By far the most frequent area of complaint was pain related to the lower back (50%) followed by pain related to the neck (15%). The majority of patients had complaints in the subacute or chronic category (duration 1-6 months). Patients with sciatica had significantly higher pain scores and limitation in activities of daily living (ADL) than any other group, whereas patients with neck pain tended to score lower. Patients in the subacute category had the highest pain scores and limitation in ADL. For complaints lasting more than 6 months, limitation in ADL remained constant at a low level. Twenty-three percent of all patients were referred to the chiropractor, most frequently by a general medical practitioner. More than half of all patients had previously been treated for the same or similar problems, most frequently by a chiropractor. Fifty-one percent had also received chiropractic care for other types of problems. CONCLUSIONS: Most Danish chiropractic patients complain of pain related to the low back or neck of between 1 and 6 months' duration. This study confirms that chiropractic is fairly well integrated in the Danish primary health care system. There are differences between the chiropractic patient population in Denmark compared with that of Sweden and Holland.
PubMed ID
11986577 View in PubMed
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Clinical impact of persistent hyperCKemia in a Norwegian general population: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120797
Source
Neuromuscul Disord. 2013 Jan;23(1):29-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Hallvard Lilleng
Karin Abeler
Stein H Johnsen
Eva Stensland
Sissel Løseth
Sigurd Lindal
Tom Wilsgaard
Svein I Bekkelund
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology and Neurophysiology, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. hallvard.lilleng@unn.no
Source
Neuromuscul Disord. 2013 Jan;23(1):29-35
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Case-Control Studies
Creatine Kinase - blood
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Neuromuscular Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
In this case-control study we assessed the clinical impact of persistent hyperCKemia in a Norwegian general population. HyperCKemia was defined according to the NORIP- references (women 35-210 U/L, men
PubMed ID
22967790 View in PubMed
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[Clinico-epidemiological aspects of hereditary neuromuscular diseases in the Krasnodar territory].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227678
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1991;91(9):3-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
M E Krivopusk
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1991;91(9):3-5
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscular Atrophy - epidemiology - genetics
Muscular Dystrophies - epidemiology - genetics
Myasthenia Gravis - epidemiology - genetics
Neuromuscular Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
A study was made of the prevalence and clinical pleomorphism of neuromuscular diseases in the Krasnodar territory. The incidence of the diseases is 15.7 per 100,000 population (738 patients). Primary progressive myodystrophies are most prevalent (6.9 per 100,000 population). The humeroscapular and facial form (1.36 per 100,000 population) and Duchenne's form (1.15 per 100,000 population) occur less frequently. The remaining forms are an extreme rarity. Secondary amyotrophies occur more seldom (23.2%). Of these, there prevail Charcot-Marie amyotrophy (2.69 per 100,000 population). The myasthenia incidence constitutes 3.05 per 100,000 population. The myotonic syndromes were encountered in 12.3%. Of these, Thomsen's myotonia occurred most frequently (1.55 per 100,000 population).
PubMed ID
1664610 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of motor neuron disease in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241772
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1983 Jul;68(1):20-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983
Author
L. Forsgren
B G Almay
G. Holmgren
S. Wall
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1983 Jul;68(1):20-9
Date
Jul-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Neurons
Muscular Atrophy - epidemiology
Neuromuscular Diseases - epidemiology
Paralysis - epidemiology
Spinal Cord Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden
Abstract
All cases of motor neuron disease (MND), encompassing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), progressive bulbar paralysis (PBP) and progressive spinal muscular atrophy (PSMA), in northern Sweden, diagnosed between 1969-1980 have been analysed. 128 cases were found, corresponding to an average annual incidence rate of 1.67 per 100,000. The prevalence on December 31, 1980 was 4.8 per 100,000. Age-specific incidence rates were higher in the high age groups with a maximum at 60-64 years for males, at 70-74 years for females and at 65-69 years for the sexes combined. The median age at onset was 61 years. Clustering was not found in mining districts and overrepresentation of miners and stone treaters was not observed. Minor differences in incidence rates, as measured by the standardized morbidity ratio, SMR, were found between the inland, coastal and mountain areas. The median survival time after onset of disease was 32 months for ALS, 30 months for PBP and 70 months for PSMA. The combined survival rate for all MND cases was 28% after 5 years and 15% after 10 years. The male to female ratio was 1.1:1, and 4.7% were familial cases.
PubMed ID
6604389 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of neuromuscular diseases, including the postpolio sequelae, in a Swedish county.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36467
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1993;12(5):262-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
G. Ahlström
L G Gunnarsson
P. Leissner
P O Sjödén
Author Affiliation
Orebro College for the Health Professions, Sweden.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1993;12(5):262-9
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Motor Neuron Disease - epidemiology
Muscular Dystrophies - epidemiology
Myositis - epidemiology
Myotonia - epidemiology
Neuromuscular Diseases - epidemiology
Postpoliomyelitis Syndrome - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The epidemiology of neuromuscular diseases was studied in the county of Orebro, Sweden (study population 270,000). Several different sources of data were utilized, compared and validated. On the prevalence of day (January 1, 1988) 474 patients were identified. The rate per 100,000 population was 92 for the postpolio sequelae (PPS) and 84 for the other neuromuscular diseases (motor neuron disease 9, hereditary neuropathies 9, myoneural disorders 16, myotonic disorders 19, muscular dystrophies 20 and myositis 11). Of the patients with the PPS, 80% reported late-onset symptoms. On the basis of an expanded survey including all medical records in one health care district, the prevalence of the PPS was estimated to be 186/100,000 population.
PubMed ID
8309501 View in PubMed
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Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies in Swedish children. I. Prevalence and distribution by disability groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40140
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1983 May;72(3):379-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1983
Author
B. Hagberg
B. Westerberg
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1983 May;72(3):379-83
Date
May-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Male
Muscular Atrophy - epidemiology
Neuromuscular Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The prevalence of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) and their distribution according to the severity of the disability were studied in a population-based series of Swedish children 2-15 years old. The prevalence per 100 000 of total peroneal muscle atrophies was 21.6 and of all clinical HMSN 19.0 Among HMSN, de- and remyelinating types (HMSN I) constituted 8 per 100000 and neuronal-axonal types (HMSN II) 11. Eighteen of the 21 HMSN I cases and 26 of the 29 HMSN II were considered to represent an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Ten per cent of all children were severely, 70% moderately and 20% mildly disabled. All the severely affected children belonged to the HMSN I group and 9 of the 10 mildly affected to HMSN II.
PubMed ID
6576612 View in PubMed
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[Hereditary neuromuscular diseases in the Samara region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193053
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2001;101(9):49-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
V V Skupchenko
N P Novikova
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2001;101(9):49-53
Date
2001
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Aged
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Child, Preschool
Electromyography
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Neuromuscular Diseases - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The paper presents the results of clinical-genealogic and electromyographic examination of 1157 patients with hereditary neuromuscular diseases from 689 families. Based on the long-term genetic registry and application of the computer multi-dimensional mathematical analysis, the authors elaborated clinical-electromyographic criteria for different forms of hereditary neuromuscular diseases by taking into account their etiologic heterogeneity. There were also general regularities and specific features of motor disorders indifferent clinical forms and at different stages of the pathological process. The findings are used by the Samara Medical-Genetic Center in its work.
PubMed ID
11586705 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.