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596 records – page 1 of 60.

3D modeling-based surgical planning in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery--preliminary results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90794
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2008 Sep;128(9):1011-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Raappana Antti
Koivukangas John
Pirilä Tapio
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. antti.raappana@oulu.fi
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2008 Sep;128(9):1011-8
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - pathology - radiography - surgery
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Endoscopy - methods
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Neurological
Pituitary Neoplasms - pathology - radiography - surgery
Prospective Studies
Surgery, Computer-Assisted - methods
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Young Adult
Abstract
CONCLUSION: The preoperative three-dimensional (3D) modeling of the pituitary adenoma together with pituitary gland, optic nerves, carotid arteries, and the sphenoid sinuses was adopted for routine use in our institution for all pituitary surgery patients. It gave the surgeon a more profound orientation to the individual surgical field compared with the use of conventional 2D images only. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the feasibility of 3D surgical planning for pituitary adenoma surgery using readily available resources. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of 40 consecutive patients with pituitary adenoma were used to construct 3D models to be used in preoperative planning and during the surgery. A freely available, open source program (3D Slicer) downloaded to a conventional personal computer (PC) was applied. RESULTS: The authors present a brief description of the 3D reconstruction-based surgical planning workflow. In addition to the preoperative planning the 3D model was used as a 'road map' during the operation. With the 3D model the surgeon was more confident when opening the sellar wall and when evacuating the tumor from areas in contact with vital structures than when using only conventional 2D images.
PubMed ID
19086197 View in PubMed
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A 6-year nationwide cohort study of glycaemic control in young people with type 1 diabetes. Risk markers for the development of retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Danish Study Group of Diabetes in Childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32420
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2000 Nov-Dec;14(6):295-300
Publication Type
Article
Author
B S Olsen
A. Sjølie
P. Hougaard
J. Johannesen
K. Borch-Johnsen
K. Marinelli
B. Thorsteinsson
S. Pramming
H B Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Glostrup University Hospital, DK-2600, Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2000 Nov-Dec;14(6):295-300
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy - physiopathology
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetic Neuropathies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetic Retinopathy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Neurologic Examination
Perception
Probability
Risk factors
Vibration
Abstract
The study aimed to identify risk markers (present at the start of the study in 1989) for the occurrence and progression of microvascular complications 6 years later (in 1995) in a Danish nationwide cohort of children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes (average age at entry 13.7 years). Probabilities for the development of elevated albumin excretion rate (AER), retinopathy, and increased vibration perception threshold (VPT) could then be estimated from a stepwise logistic regression model. A total of 339 patients (47% of the original cohort) were studied. Sex, age, diabetes duration, insulin regimen and dose, height, weight, HbA(1c), blood pressure, and AER were recorded. In addition, information on retinopathy, neuropathy (VPT), and anti-hypertensive treatment was obtained at the end of the study. HbA(1c) (normal range 4.3-5.8, mean 5.3%) and AER (upper normal limit or =20 microg min(-1)) was found in 12.8% of the patients in 1995, and risk markers for this were increased AER and high HbA(1c), in 1989 (both p6.5 V) was found in 62.5% of patients in 1995, for which the risk markers were male sex (p
PubMed ID
11120452 View in PubMed
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26th Meeting of the Scandinavian Neuropediatric Society. Bornholm, Denmark, 13-16 May 1998. Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32395
Source
Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 1998;2(2):A19-37
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
1998
Source
Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 1998;2(2):A19-37
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Child
Humans
Nervous System Diseases
Neurology
PubMed ID
10755850 View in PubMed
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100 years after Alzheimer: contemporary neurology practice assessment of referrals for dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153508
Source
Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2008 Dec-2009 Jan;23(6):516-27
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tiffany W Chow
Carin Binder
Steven Smyth
Sharon Cohen
Alain Robillard
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2008 Dec-2009 Jan;23(6):516-27
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Dementia - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Humans
Neurology - methods - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Primary Health Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The prevalence of dementia is placing an increased burden on specialists.
Canadian neurologists responded to a structured questionnaire to assess reasons for referral and services provided as well as to compare the neurologists' perceptions of their practice characteristics against cases seen over a 3-month period.
The audit confirmed the participants' perception that family practitioners are the main referral source (358/453, 79%). Sixty-two percent of patients had undergone clinical investigation for dementia prior to being seen by the neurologist; 39% (177/453) were on pharmacotherapy at the time of referral, 68% were initiated on pharmacotherapy by the neurologist. A fifth of the referrals did not meet clinical criteria for dementia, which may be directly related to the prevalence of prior workup that did not include mental status testing.
Neurologists currently treat patients referred for dementia who may already have been adequately evaluated and treated by primary care providers.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2008 Dec-2009 Jan;23(6):513-519222144
PubMed ID
19106275 View in PubMed
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[100 years of Swedish neurology--milestone and future prospects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233336
Source
Lakartidningen. 1988 Mar 9;85(10):860-2, 864
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-9-1988

[Abnormal neurological findings at first admission in patients with schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorders. Results of computer tomography and measurement of regional cerebral blood flow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212653
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Feb 12;158(7):905-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-12-1996
Author
P J Rubin
E S Vorstrup
R P Hemmingsen
H S Andersen
B B Bendsen
N J Strømsø
J K Larsen
T G Bolwig
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk afdeling E, Bispebjerg Hospital, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Feb 12;158(7):905-10
Date
Feb-12-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology - radiography
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neurologic Examination
Patient Admission
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology - radiography
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - physiopathology - radiography
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Forty-five patients with schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder admitted to hospital for the first time had a neurological examination, including integrative sensory and complex motor acts, by a trained neurologist. The patients were studied by CT and regional cerebral blood flow as well. A control group of 24 healthy volunteers was included. The patients had significantly more neurological abnormalities (NA) than the healthy volunteers. Medication did not explain the discrepancy. The NA were associated with sulcal enlargement and smaller brains as visualized by CT but not with ventricular enlargement. There was no association between the regional flow values and NA.
PubMed ID
8638327 View in PubMed
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Abstracts for the 6th European Paediatric Neurology Society, EPNS Congress, 14-17 September 2005, Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29626
Source
Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2005;9(3-4):129-302
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2005
Source
Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2005;9(3-4):129-302
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Nervous System Diseases
Neurology
Pediatrics
PubMed ID
15993635 View in PubMed
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The academic half-day in Canadian neurology residency programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177008
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2004 Nov;31(4):511-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Colin Chalk
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Centre for Medical Education, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2004 Nov;31(4):511-3
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Adult
Canada
Education, Medical - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration
Neurology - education
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Teaching - methods
Abstract
The academic half-day (AHD) appears to have become widespread in Canadian neurology residency programs, but there is little published information about the structure, content, or impact of the AHD.
A written questionnaire was sent to the directors of all active Canadian adult and child neurology residency programs.
All 21 program directors responded. An AHD was operating in 15/15 adult and 5/6 child neurology programs. The AHD typically lasts three hours, and occurs weekly, 10 months per year. Most of the weekly sessions are lectures or seminars, usually led by clinicians, with about 90% resident attendance. Course-like features (required textbook, examinations) are present in many AHDs. There is a wide range of topics, from disease pathophysiology to practice management, with considerable variation between programs.
Almost all Canadian neurology programs now have an AHD. Academic half-days are broadly similar in content and format across the country, and residents now spend a substantial portion of their training attending the AHD. The impact of the AHD on how residency programs are organized, and on the learning, clinical work, and professional development of residents merits further study.
PubMed ID
15595258 View in PubMed
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Access to multiple sclerosis diagnosis for Canadian neurologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201931
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1999 May;26(2):115-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
P. O'Connor
L. Lee
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurology, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1999 May;26(2):115-8
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - utilization
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - diagnosis
Neurology - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
Access to multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis in Canada has never been assessed. This study was designed to examine the pattern of MS diagnosis in Canada, including neurologists' diagnostic approach and waiting times for investigations.
A mail survey was forwarded to every registered neurologist in Canada (n = 479) in late 1996. Questions included their diagnostic approach to MS including perceived waiting times for various investigations including MRI. Actual MRI waiting periods were separately obtained from booking clerks or neuroradiologists from every MRI unit in Canada.
153 responses were received. Neurological assessment is obtained, on average, 1 month after referral. MRI is routinely ordered by 92% of neurologists for suspected MS followed by evoked potentials (EP) (36%) and lumbar puncture (LP) (17%). The perceived waiting period for EP and LP is less than one month but 3 months for MRI. This is very similar to the actual waiting periods obtained from the MRI units surveyed (mean of 101 days). There is a trend for longer waiting periods as one moved east to west (Eastern provinces--mean of 62 days, Ontario--95 days, Quebec--102 days and 122 days in the Western provinces). Private MRI units have appeared in the Western provinces and have the shortest waiting periods (2 weeks maximum). The current MRI/million population ratio in Canada is 1.8, far below the ratios of other developed nations.
Canadian neurologists prefer MRI of the brain to confirm an MS diagnosis and desire greater access to it. Access to neurological assessment, EP and LP is probably adequate but the average wait for MRI of 3 months is relatively long. The perceived average waiting period for MRI is similar to the actual waiting times of 3 months, with the Western provinces of Canada having the longest waits. Canada continues to have one of the lowest MRI/population ratios in the developed world.
PubMed ID
10352870 View in PubMed
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596 records – page 1 of 60.