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4th annual telemedicine program review. Part 2: United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68966
Source
Telemed Today. 1997 Aug;5(4):30-8, 42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Source
Telemed Today. 1998 Apr-May;6(2):22-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Rosen
Author Affiliation
Impact Video Communication, San Francisco, CA, USA. erosen@impactvid.com
Source
Telemed Today. 1998 Apr-May;6(2):22-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Computer Communication Networks - instrumentation - trends
Dentistry
Home Care Services
Humans
Telemedicine - instrumentation - trends
Telephone - instrumentation - trends
Television - instrumentation
United States
PubMed ID
10181176 View in PubMed
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The ability of criminal law to produce gender equality: judicial discourses in the Swedish criminal legal system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98450
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Monica Burman
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Sweden. monica.burman@jus.umu.se
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Networks - organization & administration
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Sex Factors
Spouse Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Value of Life
Women's Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The main aim of the Swedish Women's Peace reform in 1998 was to enhance criminal legal protection for women exposed to violence in heterosexual relationships and to promote gender equality. However, these ambitions risk being contravened in a masculinist criminal legal system. One problem concerns how the victim is constructed in criminal legal cases. The author argues that moral balancing and discourses of responsibility and guilt in Swedish cases constrain the agency possible for women and suggest that a more comprehensive policy in Sweden must be developed to include violent men, their agency, and their responsibility for the violence.
PubMed ID
20053946 View in PubMed
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Ability OnLine: children in hospital now in touch with the world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214112
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Lefebvre
M. McClure
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Chronic Disease - psychology
Communication Aids for Disabled
Computer Communication Networks - utilization
Disabled Persons - psychology
Humans
Organizational Innovation
Peer Group
Self Concept
Social Facilitation
Social Support
Abstract
Health prevention seeks to avoid the onset of disease or symptoms by eliminating or at least minimizing environmental factors that increase the risk of illness. This article describes Ability OnLine, an innovative program designed to reduce the isolation young people can experience in a healthcare facility or when confined to their home. The electronic bulletin board is a friendly platform for disabled and chronically ill children to easily communicate with their peers and adult and teen mentors.
PubMed ID
10172531 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal patient navigators: Facilitating access to mainstream health services for aboriginal people

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96161
Source
Page 497 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
and advocated on behalf of their clients by forging relationships with complementary systems, like justice, child and family services, and education. The APN Program has successfully accomplished the goals outlined above by facilitating cultural requirements, networking with Aboriginal communities
  1 document  
Author
Day, L.
Vlahos, P.
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Coastal Health Authority
Source
Page 497 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aboriginal health practices and beliefs
Aboriginal Patient Navigator (APN) program
Continuity of care
Discharge planning
Health care delivery
Networking
Referral and advocacy
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 12. Primary Care, Service Delivery, Health Promotion and E-Health.
Documents
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Accelerating and Strengthening Native American Health Research Through a Collaborative NIH Initiative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309779
Source
Prev Sci. 2020 01; 21(Suppl 1):1-4
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Date
01-2020
Author
Aria Davis Crump
Kathy Etz
Judith A Arroyo
Nanci Hemberger
Shobha Srinivasan
Author Affiliation
National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. ac94h@nih.gov.
Source
Prev Sci. 2020 01; 21(Suppl 1):1-4
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Keywords
American Natives
Community Networks
Humans
Intersectoral Collaboration
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Research
United States
Abstract
This paper is intended to provide an overview of the considerations that informed the development of a National Institutes of Health funding opportunity to promote health and prevent disease in Native Americans, including American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian communities. NIH Institute staff thoughtfully considered epidemiologic research findings and feedback from constituents regarding the need for more published research overall and stronger prevention efforts to address persistent health concerns affecting many Native communities. This led to the publication of four funding announcements supported by multiple NIH Institutes and one NIH Office. Through the efforts of researchers, tribal leaders, community collaborators, and NIH leadership and staff, a growing body of knowledge regarding culturally informed approaches to supporting health in Native Americans is emerging. This article describes how staff who developed the funding opportunities envisioned a process to support high impact science through ensuring methodological rigor, responsiveness to prevention needs, and respect for community heritage, values, and history with non-Native peoples. In addition, this article highlights the growth of the researchers and collaborators within a community of scientists expanding the knowledge base further by sharing their research resources, instruments, and strategies for engaging in scientific inquiry that meets the needs of Native communities and those of funding organizations.
PubMed ID
29143223 View in PubMed
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Accomplishment level and satisfaction with social participation of older adults: association with quality of life and best correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144806
Source
Qual Life Res. 2010 Jun;19(5):665-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Mélanie Levasseur
Johanne Desrosiers
Gale Whiteneck
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12ième avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, QC, J1H 5N4, Canada. Melanie.Levasseur@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Qual Life Res. 2010 Jun;19(5):665-75
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Analysis of Variance
Community Networks
Consumer Participation
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Motor Activity
Quality of Life - psychology
Quebec
Social Perception
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
This study aimed to (1) explore whether quality of life (QOL) is more associated with satisfaction with social participation (SP) than with level of accomplishment in SP and (2) examine respective correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP.
A cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample of 155 older adults (mean age=73.7; 60% women) having various levels of activity limitations. Accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP (dependent variables) were estimated with the social roles items of the assessment of life habits. Potential correlates were human functioning components.
Correlations between QOL and accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP did not differ (P=0.71). However, best correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP were different. Higher accomplishment level of SP was best explained by younger age, activity level perceived as stable, no recent stressing event, better well-being, higher activity level, and fewer obstacles in "Physical environment and accessibility" (R2=0.79). Greater satisfaction with SP was best explained by activity level perceived as stable, better self-perceived health, better well-being, higher activity level, and more facilitators in "Social support and attitudes" (R2=0.51).
With some exceptions, these best correlates may be positively modified and thus warrant special attention in rehabilitation interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20237957 View in PubMed
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Adaptive comanagement for building resilience in social-ecological systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50613
Source
Environ Manage. 2004 Jul;34(1):75-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Per Olsson
Carl Folke
Fikret Berkes
Author Affiliation
Department of Systems Ecology and Centre for Transdisciplinary Environmental Research, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. potto@system.ecology.su.se
Source
Environ Manage. 2004 Jul;34(1):75-90
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Networks
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecology
Ecosystem
Humans
Information Services
Knowledge
Organizational Culture
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Conditions
Sweden
Abstract
Ecosystems are complex adaptive systems that require flexible governance with the ability to respond to environmental feedback. We present, through examples from Sweden and Canada, the development of adaptive comanagement systems, showing how local groups self-organize, learn, and actively adapt to and shape change with social networks that connect institutions and organizations across levels and scales and that facilitate information flows. The development took place through a sequence of responses to environmental events that widened the scope of local management from a particular issue or resource to a broad set of issues related to ecosystem processes across scales and from individual actors, to group of actors to multiple-actor processes. The results suggest that the institutional and organizational landscapes should be approached as carefully as the ecological in order to clarify features that contribute to the resilience of social-ecological systems. These include the following: vision, leadership, and trust; enabling legislation that creates social space for ecosystem management; funds for responding to environmental change and for remedial action; capacity for monitoring and responding to environmental feedback; information flow through social networks; the combination of various sources of information and knowledge; and sense-making and arenas of collaborative learning for ecosystem management. We propose that the self-organizing process of adaptive comanagement development, facilitated by rules and incentives of higher levels, has the potential to expand desirable stability domains of a region and make social-ecological systems more robust to change.
PubMed ID
15383875 View in PubMed
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Additive survival least-squares support vector machines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98556
Source
Stat Med. 2010 Jan 30;29(2):296-308
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2010
Author
V. Van Belle
K. Pelckmans
J A K Suykens
S. Van Huffel
Author Affiliation
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, ESAT-SCD, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10 bus 2446, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium. vanya.vanbelle@esat.kuleuven.be
Source
Stat Med. 2010 Jan 30;29(2):296-308
Date
Jan-30-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Artificial Intelligence
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - drug therapy - metabolism
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Least-Squares Analysis
Neural Networks (Computer)
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Principal Component Analysis
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Recurrence
Risk
Survival Analysis
Abstract
This work studies a new survival modeling technique based on least-squares support vector machines. We propose the use of a least-squares support vector machine combining ranking and regression. The advantage of this kernel-based model is threefold: (i) the problem formulation is convex and can be solved conveniently by a linear system; (ii) non-linearity is introduced by using kernels, componentwise kernels in particular are useful to obtain interpretable results; and (iii) introduction of ranking constraints makes it possible to handle censored data. In an experimental setup, the model is used as a preprocessing step for the standard Cox proportional hazard regression by estimating the functional forms of the covariates. The proposed model was compared with different survival models from the literature on the clinical German Breast Cancer Study Group data and on the high-dimensional Norway/Stanford Breast Cancer Data set.
PubMed ID
20024943 View in PubMed
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625 records – page 1 of 63.