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1188 records – page 1 of 119.

19th Anglo-Danish-Dutch Diabetes Group meeting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47563
Source
Diabet Med. 2002 Mar;19(3):259
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Mar-2002
Author
E J P de Koning
T. Vilsboll
F. Dela
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Vascular Medicine, Diabetes and Endocrinology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
Source
Diabet Med. 2002 Mar;19(3):259
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Denmark
Diabetes mellitus
England
Humans
Netherlands
PubMed ID
11918629 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal symptoms and cancer in the abdomen: prospective cohort study in European primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303030
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2018 05; 68(670):e301-e310
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-2018
Author
Knut Holtedahl
Peter Hjertholm
Lars Borgquist
Gé A Donker
Frank Buntinx
David Weller
Tonje Braaten
Jörgen Månsson
Eva Lena Strandberg
Christine Campbell
Joke C Korevaar
Ranjan Parajuli
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2018 05; 68(670):e301-e310
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Abdominal Pain - etiology - pathology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Belgium - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - etiology - pathology
Hematuria - etiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Primary Health Care
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Scotland - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
Different abdominal symptoms may signal cancer, but their role is unclear.
To examine associations between abdominal symptoms and subsequent cancer diagnosed in the abdominal region.
Prospective cohort study comprising 493 GPs from surgeries in Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Scotland, Belgium, and the Netherlands.
Over a 10-day period, the GPs recorded consecutive consultations and noted: patients who presented with abdominal symptoms pre-specified on the registration form; additional data on non-specific symptoms; and features of the consultation. Eight months later, data on all cancer diagnoses among all study patients in the participating general practices were requested from the GPs.
Consultations with 61 802 patients were recorded and abdominal symptoms were documented in 6264 (10.1%) patients. Malignancy, both abdominal and non-abdominal, was subsequently diagnosed in 511 patients (0.8%). Among patients with a new cancer in the abdomen (n = 251), 175 (69.7%) were diagnosed within 180 days after consultation. In a multivariate model, the highest sex- and age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was for the single symptom of rectal bleeding (HR 19.1, 95% confidence interval = 8.7 to 41.7). Positive predictive values of >3% were found for macroscopic haematuria, rectal bleeding, and involuntary weight loss, with variations according to age and sex. The three symptoms relating to irregular bleeding had particularly high specificity in terms of colorectal, uterine, and bladder cancer.
A patient with undiagnosed cancer may present with symptoms or no symptoms. Irregular bleeding must always be explained. Abdominal pain occurs with all types of abdominal cancer and several symptoms may signal colorectal cancer. The findings are important as they influence how GPs think and act, and how they can contribute to an earlier diagnosis of cancer.
PubMed ID
29632003 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal symptoms and cancer in the abdomen: prospective cohort study in European primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303215
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2018 05; 68(670):e301-e310
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-2018
Author
Knut Holtedahl
Peter Hjertholm
Lars Borgquist
Gé A Donker
Frank Buntinx
David Weller
Tonje Braaten
Jörgen Månsson
Eva Lena Strandberg
Christine Campbell
Joke C Korevaar
Ranjan Parajuli
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2018 05; 68(670):e301-e310
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Abdominal Pain - etiology - pathology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Belgium - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - etiology - pathology
Hematuria - etiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Primary Health Care
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Scotland - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
Different abdominal symptoms may signal cancer, but their role is unclear.
To examine associations between abdominal symptoms and subsequent cancer diagnosed in the abdominal region.
Prospective cohort study comprising 493 GPs from surgeries in Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Scotland, Belgium, and the Netherlands.
Over a 10-day period, the GPs recorded consecutive consultations and noted: patients who presented with abdominal symptoms pre-specified on the registration form; additional data on non-specific symptoms; and features of the consultation. Eight months later, data on all cancer diagnoses among all study patients in the participating general practices were requested from the GPs.
Consultations with 61 802 patients were recorded and abdominal symptoms were documented in 6264 (10.1%) patients. Malignancy, both abdominal and non-abdominal, was subsequently diagnosed in 511 patients (0.8%). Among patients with a new cancer in the abdomen (n = 251), 175 (69.7%) were diagnosed within 180 days after consultation. In a multivariate model, the highest sex- and age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was for the single symptom of rectal bleeding (HR 19.1, 95% confidence interval = 8.7 to 41.7). Positive predictive values of >3% were found for macroscopic haematuria, rectal bleeding, and involuntary weight loss, with variations according to age and sex. The three symptoms relating to irregular bleeding had particularly high specificity in terms of colorectal, uterine, and bladder cancer.
A patient with undiagnosed cancer may present with symptoms or no symptoms. Irregular bleeding must always be explained. Abdominal pain occurs with all types of abdominal cancer and several symptoms may signal colorectal cancer. The findings are important as they influence how GPs think and act, and how they can contribute to an earlier diagnosis of cancer.
PubMed ID
29632003 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aberrant expression of miR-218 and miR-204 in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis-convergence on axonal guidance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260948
Source
Epilepsia. 2014 Dec;55(12):2017-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Sanne S Kaalund
Morten T Venø
Mads Bak
Rikke S Møller
Henning Laursen
Flemming Madsen
Helle Broholm
Bjørn Quistorff
Peter Uldall
Niels Tommerup
Sakari Kauppinen
Anne Sabers
Kees Fluiter
Lisbeth B Møller
Anne Y Nossent
Asli Silahtaroglu
Jørgen Kjems
Eleonora Aronica
Zeynep Tümer
Source
Epilepsia. 2014 Dec;55(12):2017-27
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Embryo, Mammalian
Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe - complications - metabolism - pathology
Female
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Expression Regulation - physiology
Glutamate Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Hippocampus - metabolism
Humans
Male
MicroRNAs - metabolism
Middle Aged
Nerve Tissue Proteins - metabolism
Netherlands
Pyramidal Cells - metabolism - pathology
Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate - metabolism
Reproducibility of Results
Sclerosis - etiology - pathology
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Swine
Young Adult
Abstract
Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is one of the most common types of the intractable epilepsies and is most often associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is characterized by pronounced loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be dysregulated in epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases, and we hypothesized that miRNAs could be involved in the pathogenesis of MTLE and HS.
miRNA expression was quantified in hippocampal specimens from human patients using miRNA microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction RT-PCR, and by RNA-seq on fetal brain specimens from domestic pigs. In situ hybridization was used to show the spatial distribution of miRNAs in the human hippocampus. The potential effect of miRNAs on targets genes was investigated using the dual luciferase reporter gene assay.
miRNA expression profiling showed that 25 miRNAs were up-regulated and 5 were down-regulated in hippocampus biopsies of MTLE/HS patients compared to controls. We showed that miR-204 and miR-218 were significantly down-regulated in MTLE and HS, and both were expressed in neurons in all subfields of normal hippocampus. Moreover, miR-204 and miR-218 showed strong changes in expression during fetal development of the hippocampus in pigs, and we identified four target genes, involved in axonal guidance and synaptic plasticity, ROBO1, GRM1, SLC1A2, and GNAI2, as bona fide targets of miR-218. GRM1 was also shown to be a direct target of miR-204.
miR-204 and miR-218 are developmentally regulated in the hippocampus and may contribute to the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of MTLE and HS.
PubMed ID
25410734 View in PubMed
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Ablation trumps meds for atrial fibrillation treatment. Catheter ablation provides better long-term relief from atrial fibrillation than medication, but surgical ablation is best, a second study concludes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122994
Source
Duke Med Health News. 2012 Mar;18(3):1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012

Abortion, 1973: some recent world events in relation to pregnancy termination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66364
Source
Trans Aust Med Congr. 1974 Jun 1;1(5):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1974
Source
Trans Aust Med Congr. 1974 Jun 1;1(5):27-30
Date
Jun-1-1974
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Americas
Developed Countries
Europe
Europe, Eastern
Family Planning Services
France
Germany, East
Germany, West
Great Britain
Italy
Netherlands
North America
Norway
Scandinavia
Sweden
United States
Abstract
This selective report notes recent events relating to pregnancy termination in the U.S., France, England, Italy, East and West Germany, Norway, Sweden, and the Netherlands. Due to the Supreme Court decision in January 1973, abortion is now legal in the U.S. Although abortions is illegal in France, an estimated 400,000-1,000,000 clandestine abortions occur each year. Although abortions are legal in Britain, the ease with which they can be obtained varies regionally. As of March 1973, contraceptives are part of Britain's National Health Service. In Italy, a bill to legalize abortion has been introduced in Parliament, though there is little likelihood of its passing. In East Germany, abortion can be granted for medical or social reasons, while in West Germany, the governmental policies are more conservative, resulting in an abundance of illegal abortions performed by physicians. There is a trend toward easier abortion laws in Norway and Sweden. Little is happening in the Netherlands as far as liberalizing the abortion laws. Rather liberal grounds for pregnancy termination exist in China (though emphasis is on contraception), India, Russia, and Eastern Europe (with the exception of Romania). Abortion is frowned upon in Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East resulting in a large number of illegal abortions. It is concluded that there is liberalized abortion in communist bloc countries, there is trend toward liberalizing abortion in a large group of western countries, and tradition and religion are responsible for conservative abortion laws in a third group of countries.
PubMed ID
12333737 View in PubMed
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Abortion in adolescence: a four-country comparison.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63836
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2001 Mar-Apr;11(2):73-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Welsh
M. McCarthy
B. Cromer
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospitals, Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health, Columbus, OH, USA.
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2001 Mar-Apr;11(2):73-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Comparative Study
England
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Pregnancy
Sweden
United States
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to conduct a comparison, using qualitative analytic methodology, of perceptions concerning abortion among health care providers and administrators, along with politicians and anti-abortion activists (total n = 75) in Great Britain, Sweden, The Netherlands, and the United States. In none of these countries was there consensus about abortion prior to legalization, and, in all countries, public discussion continues to be present. In general, after legalization of abortion has no longer made it a volatile issue European countries have refocused their energy into providing family planning services, education, and more straightforward access to abortion compared with similar activities in the United States.
PubMed ID
11275509 View in PubMed
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Access Governance for Biobanks: The Case of the BioSHaRE-EU Cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279361
Source
Biopreserv Biobank. 2016 Jun;14(3):201-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Jane Kaye
Linda Briceño Moraia
Colin Mitchell
Jessica Bell
Jasper Adriaan Bovenberg
Anne-Marie Tassé
Bartha Maria Knoppers
Source
Biopreserv Biobank. 2016 Jun;14(3):201-6
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Biomedical Research - legislation & jurisprudence
Cooperative Behavior
Databases, Factual
European Union
Finland
Germany
Humans
Information Dissemination - legislation & jurisprudence
Interprofessional Relations
Netherlands
Norway
United Kingdom
Abstract
Currently, researchers have to apply separately to individual biobanks if they want to carry out studies that use samples and data from multiple biobanks. This article analyzes the access governance arrangements of the original five biobank members of the Biobank Standardisation and Harmonisation for Research Excellence in the European Union (BioSHaRE-EU) project in Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom to identify similarities and differences in policies and procedures, and consider the potential for internal policy "harmonization." Our analysis found differences in the range of researchers and organizations eligible to access biobanks; application processes; requirements for Research Ethics Committee approval; and terms of Material Transfer Agreements relating to ownership and commercialization. However, the main elements of access are the same across biobanks; access will be granted to bona fide researchers conducting research in the public interest, and all biobanks will consider the scientific merit of the proposed use and it's compatibility with the biobank's objectives. These findings suggest potential areas for harmonization across biobanks. This could be achieved through a single centralized application to a number of biobanks or a system of mutual recognition that places a presumption in favor of access to one biobank if already approved by another member of the same consortium. Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure-European Research Infrastructure Consortia (BBMRI-ERIC), a European consortium of biobanks and bioresources with its own ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) common service, could provide a platform by developing guidelines for harmonized internal processes.
PubMed ID
27183185 View in PubMed
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Accident Risk in the Production Sector of EU Countries-Cohort Studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311902
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 03 31; 18(7):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-31-2021
Author
Krzysztof Nowacki
Author Affiliation
Department of Production Engineering, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Katowice, Poland.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 03 31; 18(7):
Date
03-31-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accidents
Cohort Studies
European Union
France
Germany
Humans
Italy
Netherlands
Portugal
Spain
Sweden
United Kingdom
Abstract
(1) Background: accident rates prove the uneven development of the member countries in the area of work safety. Remedial actions and structural programmes should take into account, e.g., the level of work safety in all European Union (EU) countries. Aim: the identification of differences in the level of work safety in the production sector of EU countries, especially the so-called "old" and "new" EU countries. (2) Methods: for each country UE (in 2008-2018), the relative risk (RR) of an accident at work was determined and a comparative analysis was conducted. (3) Results: an increase in the RR of an accident at work was observed along with an increase in the GDP of a given country. It was found that the level of occupational safety in Sweden and the United Kingdom is higher than in other countries, and lower in Spain and Portugal. In the three largest economies of the EU, Germany, France, and Italy, the RR of the accident in the industrial sector in relation to the national data is one of the lowest in the entire EU, not exceeding 1.3. In The Netherlands, an increase of 1.7 RR of fatal accidents in the industrial sector was observed between 2008 and 2018. (4) Conclusions: RR in the manufacturing sector of the so-called "old" EU is higher than in the so-called "new" EU, which may result from the implementation of Industry 4.0 assumptions in the "old" EU. The presented results and conclusions may be useful in shaping the EU policy in the field of sustainable development of production sectors of individual member countries.
PubMed ID
33807270 View in PubMed
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1188 records – page 1 of 119.