Skip header and navigation

Refine By

559 records – page 1 of 56.

The 10th International Conference on Brain Tumor Research and Therapy. Voss, Norway, September 6-9, 1993. Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24259
Source
J Neurooncol. 1993;15 Suppl:S1-32
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
1993
Source
J Neurooncol. 1993;15 Suppl:S1-32
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Animals
Brain Neoplasms - therapy
Humans
PubMed ID
7907361 View in PubMed
Less detail

10th International Conference on Long-Term Complications of Treatment of Children and Adolescents for Cancer, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada, June 6-7, 2008--State of the Art Series. Commentary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151706
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2009 Aug;53(2):248
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009

12th Conference of the European Society for Hyperthermic Oncology. Bergen, Norway, 26-29 June 1991. Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24831
Source
Strahlenther Onkol. 1991 Jun;167(6):325-57
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Source
Strahlenther Onkol. 1991 Jun;167(6):325-57
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Animals
Humans
Hyperthermia, Induced
Neoplasms - therapy
PubMed ID
1676857 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aconsulting clinic for head and neck tumours.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256284
Source
Manit Med Rev. 1971 May-Jun;51(3):16-7
Publication Type
Article

[A correction of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense by enterosorption with the use of polysorbates during the combined treatment of the III/IV stage ovarian cancer]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10804
Source
Klin Khir. 1998;(5):30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
O I Temchenko
I M Klishch
Source
Klin Khir. 1998;(5):30-1
Date
1998
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Antioxidants - metabolism
Combined Modality Therapy
English Abstract
Enterosorption - methods
Female
Humans
Lipid Peroxidation - drug effects
Neoplasm Staging
Ovarian Neoplasms - therapy
Polysorbates - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Surface-Active Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
In 62 patients with ovarial cancer of III-IV stage under the influence of enterosorption using polysorb the contents of primary and intermediate products of peroxidal oxidation of lipids have reduced and the antioxidant system indexes did not change.
PubMed ID
9787568 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2007 Aug;15(8):1003-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Joan Faily
Doreen Oneschuk
Author Affiliation
Edmonton Palliative Medicine Program, Regional Palliative Care Consult Team, Health Services Building, Grey Nuns Hospital, 1100 Youville Drive W, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Joan.Faily@capitalhealth.ca
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2007 Aug;15(8):1003-7
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Palliative Care
Abstract
Acupuncture involves the insertion of needles into designated acupuncture points to aid in the treatment of symptoms and to improve health.
A survey was conducted in a tertiary palliative care unit where 50 patients with advanced cancer were surveyed to determine their understanding of, use of, and interest in acupuncture.
Twenty-seven (54%) patients provided an accurate understanding of acupuncture. Although only 30% of patients had previously used acupuncture to treat noncancer medical conditions and only 10% had used it for cancer related symptoms, 80% of patients were interested in seeing an acupuncture practitioner on the care unit if one was made available.
Although few advanced cancer patients on a tertiary palliative care unit had previously received acupuncture, many had a general understanding of this complementary therapy, and expressed an interest in seeing an acupuncture practitioner.
PubMed ID
17636346 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute hospital admission for nursing home residents without cognitive impairment with a diagnosis of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277759
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2015 Mar;24(2):147-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
J. Drageset
G E Eide
C. Harrington
A H Ranhoff
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2015 Mar;24(2):147-54
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - therapy
Norway
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Studies of hospitalisation of cognitively intact nursing home (NH) residents with cancer are scarce. Knowledge about associations between socio-demographic, medical and social support variables and hospital admissions aids in preventing unnecessary admissions. This is part of a prospective study from 2004 to 2005 with follow-up to 2010 for admission rates. We studied whether residents with cancer have more admissions and whether socio-demographic and medical variables and social support subdimensions are associated with admission among cognitively intact NH residents with (n = 60) and without (n = 167) cancer aged =65 years scoring =0.5 on the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale and residing =6 months. We measured social support by face-to-face interview. We identified all respondents through NH medical records for hospital admission, linking their identification numbers to the hospital record system to register all admissions. We examined whether socio-demographic and medical variables (medical records) and social support subscales were associated with the time between inclusion and first admission. Residents with cancer had more admissions (25/60) than those without (53/167) (odds ratio 1.7). Social integration was correlated with admission (P = 0.04) regardless of cancer diagnosis. Residents with cancer had more hospital admissions than those without. Higher social integration gave more admissions independent of cancer diagnosis.
PubMed ID
24754568 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptation, dissemination, and evaluation of a cancer palliative care curriculum for the Indian health system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97306
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(1):15-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Cheryl Arenella
Bruce Finke
Timothy Domer
Judith S Kaur
Melanie P Merriman
Anita Ousley
Author Affiliation
National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 6116 Executive Blvd., Suite 410/Room 4104, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA. arenellac@mail.nih.gov
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(1):15-21
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
CD-ROM
Curriculum
Education, Professional - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Multimedia
Neoplasms - therapy
Palliative Care
Program Evaluation
United States
Abstract
In 2006, the Indian Health Service (IHS) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) collaborated to develop an interdisciplinary palliative training program for health professionals in the Indian health system. Their goal was to improve clinician knowledge and skills in palliative care, to train future trainers, and to increase access to palliative care for American Indians and Alaska Natives. The combined program of participant self-study utilizing a multimedia CD-ROM and train-the-trainer seminars followed the curriculum entitled Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology (EPEC-O) with American Indian and Alaska Native Cultural Considerations. Three seminars trained 89 interdisciplinary health providers from throughout the Indian health system. Evaluations demonstrated increased clinician self-reported knowledge and confidence to train and high satisfaction with training. Forty-two of 67 participants completed an anonymous post-conference Web questionnaire. Nearly half had conducted or definitively planned palliative education sessions, and 57 percent started new palliative services at their practice sites.
PubMed ID
20402180 View in PubMed
Less detail

Added value of health-related quality of life measurement in cancer clinical trials: the experience of the NCIC CTG.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144286
Source
Expert Rev Pharmacoecon Outcomes Res. 2010 Apr;10(2):119-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Heather-Jane Au
Jolie Ringash
Michael Brundage
Michael Palmer
Harriet Richardson
Ralph M Meyer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, AB T6G 1Z2, Canada. heather-jane.au@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Expert Rev Pharmacoecon Outcomes Res. 2010 Apr;10(2):119-28
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic - methods
Data Collection - methods
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Endpoint Determination
Health status
Humans
Neoplasms - therapy
Quality of Life
Abstract
Health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) data are often included in Phase III clinical trials. We evaluate and classify the value added to Phase III trials by HRQoL outcomes, through a review of the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group clinical trials experience within various cancer patient populations. HRQoL may add value in a variety of ways, including the provision of data that may contrast with or may support the primary study outcome; or that assess a unique perspective or subgroup, not addressed by the primary outcome. Thus, HRQoL data may change the study's interpretation. Even in situations where HRQoL measurement does not alter the clinical interpretation of a trial, important methodologic advances can be made. A classification of the added value of HRQoL information is provided, which may assist in choosing trials for which measurement of HRQoL outcomes will be beneficial.
PubMed ID
20384559 View in PubMed
Less detail

559 records – page 1 of 56.