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609 records – page 1 of 61.

The 1st step: a personal health-care planner from the Canadian Cancer Society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229611
Source
J Palliat Care. 1990;6(2):48-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
C. Jamieson
Source
J Palliat Care. 1990;6(2):48-50
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Neoplasms - psychology
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Voluntary Health Agencies
PubMed ID
2376807 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 10th Scientific Meeting of the European Society for Psychosocial Oncology (ESPO). Stockholm, Sweden, June 14-17, 1998. Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21463
Source
Psychooncology. 1998 May-Jun;7(3):149-96
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Source
Psychooncology. 1998 May-Jun;7(3):149-96
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Humans
Neoplasms - psychology
Social Support
PubMed ID
9741976 View in PubMed
Less detail

[15th year of the Reach to Recovery Program in Russia: analysis of activity and evaluation of effectiveness (exemplified by the St. Petersburg experience)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168964
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2005;51(5):612-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005

Abstracts of the 7th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology. August 25-28, 2004, Copenhagen, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17468
Source
Psychooncology. 2004 Aug;13(8 Suppl):S1-233
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Source
Psychooncology. 2004 Aug;13(8 Suppl):S1-233
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Humans
Neoplasms - psychology
PubMed ID
15452971 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of the Danish version of the 'distress thermometer'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137474
Source
Psychooncology. 2012 Apr;21(4):436-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Pernille Envold Bidstrup
Birgitte Goldschmidt Mertz
Susanne Oksbjerg Dalton
Isabelle Deltour
Niels Kroman
Henrik Kehlet
Nina Rottmann
Rune Gärtner
Alex J Mitchell
Christoffer Johansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Cancer Research, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. pernille@cancer.dk
Source
Psychooncology. 2012 Apr;21(4):436-43
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - diagnosis
Breast Neoplasms - psychology
Denmark
Depression - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Questionnaires
Sensitivity and specificity
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis
Abstract
Short screening instruments have been suggested to improve the detection of psychological symptoms. We examined the accuracy of the Danish version of the 'Distress Thermometer'.
Between October 2008 and October 2009, 426 women with newly diagnosed primary breast cancer who were operated at the Breast Surgery Clinic of the Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, were eligible for this study. Of these, 357 participated (84%) and 333 completed a questionnaire. The distress thermometer was evaluated against the 'hospital anxiety and depression scale' (HADS). We also examined the women's wish for referral for psychological support.
A cut-off score of 6 vs 7 (low: =6, high: =7) on the distress thermometer was optimal for confirming distress, with a sensitivity of 42%, a specificity of 93%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 78% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 73%. A cut-off score of 2 vs 3 was optimal for screening, with a sensitivity of 99%, a specificity of 36%, a PPV of 47% and a NPV of 99%. Of those who were distressed using the cut-off score of 2 vs 3 on the distress thermometer, 17% (n = 41) wished to be referred for psychological support and 57% (n = 140) potentially wanted a later referral.
The distress thermometer performed satisfactorily relative to the HADS in detecting distress in our study. A screening procedure in which application of the distress thermometer is a first step could be useful for identifying persons in need of support.
PubMed ID
21280139 View in PubMed
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Adventure therapy for adolescents with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179137
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2004 Sep;43(3):278-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Bonnie Stevens
Susan Kagan
Janet Yamada
Iris Epstein
Madelyn Beamer
Mario Bilodeau
Sylvain Baruchel
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2004 Sep;43(3):278-84
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Female
Humans
Male
Memory
Nature
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Quality of Life
Recreation
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe adolescents' with cancer experience in an adventure therapy program from a health related quality of life (HRQL) perspective. A qualitative descriptive research method was used. Eleven adolescents and five health professionals participated in a guided group adventure therapy expedition in a remote area of Canada. The expedition was videotaped and data were collected using an unstructured interview format with both adolescents and health professionals. Emerging themes were identified using a qualitative descriptive exploratory analysis. Four major themes and related sub-themes were generated. The major themes were: developing connections, togetherness, rebuilding self-esteem, and creating memories. Adventure therapy was viewed by the adolescents and health care professionals as a positive experience with multiple benefits. This preliminary research will contribute to an understanding of adolescents' experiences with cancer and provide a basis for future studies evaluating the impact of adventure therapy on HRQL.
PubMed ID
15266414 View in PubMed
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Aesthetic result after breast-conserving therapy is associated with quality of life several years after treatment. Swedish women evaluated with BCCT.core and BREAST-Q™.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289249
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2017 Aug; 164(3):679-687
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Cecilia Dahlbäck
Jenny Heiman Ullmark
Martin Rehn
Anita Ringberg
Jonas Manjer
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. cecilia.dahlback@med.lu.se.
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2017 Aug; 164(3):679-687
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - psychology - surgery
Female
Humans
Mastectomy, Segmental - methods
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Life - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A gold standard for evaluation of aesthetic outcome after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) is still lacking. The BCCT.core software has been developed to assess aesthetic result in a standardised way. We aimed to study how the result of BCCT.core after BCT is associated with quality of life, measured with the BREAST-Q™, a validated questionnaire.
Women eligible for BCT were consecutively recruited between February 1st 2008 and January 31st 2012 (n = 653). Photographs of 310 women, taken one year after BCT, were evaluated using the BCCT.core software. The postoperative BCT module of the BREAST-Q™ questionnaire was administered by mail and 348 questionnaires were returned (median 5.5 years after BCT). In all, 216 women had both BCCT.core results and completed BREAST-Q™ questionnaires available.
The results from the BCCT.core evaluation were: excellent n = 49 (15.8%); good n = 178 (57.4%); fair n = 73 (23.5%); poor n = 10 (3.2%). The median BREAST-Q™ score for satisfaction with breasts was 66 [interquartile range (IQR) 57-80] and for psychosocial well-being 82 (IQR 61-100). Poor/fair results on BCCT.core were associated with Q-scores below median for both satisfaction with breasts [odds ratio (OR) 3.4 (confidence interval (CI) 1.7-6.8)] as well as for psychosocial well-being [OR 2.2 (CI 1.1-4.2)].
A statistically significant association between BCCT.core results one year after BCT and quality of life ratings using BREAST-Q™ several years later is shown in this study. This implies that the BCCT.core may be valuable in BCT follow-up and used as a standardised instrument in the evaluation of aesthetic results.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28536951 View in PubMed
Less detail

'A life on hold': adolescents' experiences of stem cell transplantation in a long-term perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90988
Source
J Child Health Care. 2008 Dec;12(4):301-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Forinder Ulla
Posse Ebba
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Social Work, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. Ulla.Forinder@socarb.su.se
Source
J Child Health Care. 2008 Dec;12(4):301-13
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Cost of Illness
Female
Friends - psychology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - psychology
Psychotherapy
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Social Support
Stem Cell Transplantation - adverse effects - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Stem cell transplantation is one of the treatment methods for cancer in children and adolescents which has resulted in a positive outcome. Unfortunately this method of treatment brings with it a number of late effects such as short stature, cognitive effects and infertility. However, a majority of children and adolescents experience a good quality of life. By examining their medical records this study has gained a deeper understanding of the situation for the minority of young people who describe themselves as suffering severe mental distress which they relate to their illness and treatment. The population comprised seven adolescents who sought psychotherapeutic support several years after treatment. They describe how they are affected by the feeling of being different, the loss of contact with friends and their dependence on parents. The study points to the need for long-term psychosocial support for children and adolescents who have undergone stem cell transplantation.
PubMed ID
19052188 View in PubMed
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All-cause mortality among men whose cohabiting partner has been diagnosed with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118419
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Jan;24(1):96-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Naoki Nakaya
Kumi Saito-Nakaya
Pernille E Bidstrup
Susanne O Dalton
Kirsten Frederiksen
Hanne Würtzen
Marianne Steding-Jessen
Yosuke Uchitomi
Morten Frisch
Christoffer Johansen
Author Affiliation
Survivorship, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden, Copenhagen, Denmark. nakaya-thk@umin.ac.jp
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Jan;24(1):96-9
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - psychology
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Spouses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Previous studies suggest that spouses of cancer patients are at increased risk for several chronic diseases. We investigated mortality in relation to cancer morbidity in the stable female partner.
We established a national retrospective cohort study of 1,422,131 men who had lived continuously with the same partner for at least 5 years and used Cox regression analysis to assess the association between experiencing cancer in a cohabiting partner and all-cause mortality.
The risk for death was only slightly elevated among men whose partner had cancer than for men whose partner remained free of cancer (hazard ratio = 1.03; 95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.05).
Although a cancer diagnosis in a spouse might be associated with considerable distress, our study indicates that the risk for death differs only slightly between men living with a partner with cancer and those living with a partner without cancer.
PubMed ID
23211347 View in PubMed
Less detail

Altered self-perception in adult survivors treated for a CNS tumor in childhood or adolescence: population-based outcomes compared with the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268808
Source
Neuro Oncol. 2015 May;17(5):733-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Lina Hörnquist
Jenny Rickardsson
Birgitta Lannering
Göran Gustafsson
Krister K Boman
Source
Neuro Oncol. 2015 May;17(5):733-40
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Image - psychology
Central Nervous System Neoplasms - psychology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Quality of Life
Self Concept
Survivors - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Survivors of pediatric CNS tumors are at risk for persistent tumor/treatment-related morbidity, physical disability and social consequences that may alter self-perception, vital for self-identity, mental health and quality of survival. We studied the long-term impact of childhood CNS tumors and their treatment on the self-perception of adult survivors and compared outcomes with those of the general population.
The cohort included 697 Swedish survivors diagnosed with a primary CNS tumor during 1982-2001. Comparison data were randomly collected from a stratified general population sample. Survivors and general population individuals were compared as regards self-perception in 5 domains: body image, sports/physical activities, peers, work, and family, and with a global self-esteem index. Within the survivor group, determinants of impact on self-perception were identified.
The final analyzed sample included 528 survivors, 75.8% of the entire national cohort. The control sample consisted of 995, 41% of 2500 addressed. Survivors had significantly poorer self-perception outcomes in domains of peers, work, body image, and sports/physical activities, and in the global self-perception measure, compared with those of the general population (all P
Notes
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PubMed ID
25332406 View in PubMed
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609 records – page 1 of 61.