Skip header and navigation

Refine By

107 records – page 1 of 11.

1H MRS studies in the Finnish boron neutron capture therapy project: detection of 10B-carrier, L-p-boronophenylalanine-fructose.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172386
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2005 Nov;56(2):154-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
M. Timonen
L. Kankaanranta
N. Lundbom
J. Collan
A. Kangasmäki
M. Kortesniemi
A-M Häkkinen
A. Lönngren
S. Karjalainen
M. Rasilainen
J. Leinonen
T. Huitti
J. Jääskeläinen
M. Kouri
S. Savolainen
S. Heikkinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, POB 64, FIN-00014, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2005 Nov;56(2):154-9
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Boron - therapeutic use
Boron Compounds - analysis - blood
Boron Neutron Capture Therapy
Brain Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Carcinoma - pathology - radiotherapy
Female
Finland
Fructose - analogs & derivatives - analysis - blood
Glioblastoma - pathology - radiotherapy
Humans
Hydrogen
Isotopes - therapeutic use
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods
Male
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - pathology - radiotherapy
Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Phantoms, Imaging
Plasma
Radiopharmaceuticals - therapeutic use
Abstract
This article summarizes the current status of 1H MRS in detecting and quantifying a boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) boron carrier, L-p-boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) in vivo in the Finnish BNCT project. The applicability of 1H MRS to detect BPA-F is evaluated and discussed in a typical situation with a blood containing resection cavity within the gross tumour volume (GTV). 1H MRS is not an ideal method to study BPA concentration in GTV with blood in recent resection cavity. For an optimal identification of BPA signals in the in vivo 1H MR spectrum, both pre- and post-infusion 1H MRS should be performed. The post-infusion spectroscopy studies should be scheduled either prior to or, less optimally, immediately after the BNCT. The pre-BNCT MRS is necessary in order to utilise the MRS results in the actual dose planning.
PubMed ID
16233888 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adjuvant hypofractionated versus conventional whole breast radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer: long-term hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104800
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2014 Mar 15;88(4):786-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2014
Author
Elisa K Chan
Ryan Woods
Mary L McBride
Sean Virani
Alan Nichol
Caroline Speers
Elaine S Wai
Scott Tyldesley
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, Canada.
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2014 Mar 15;88(4):786-92
Date
Mar-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast - pathology
Breast Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy - surgery
British Columbia
Dose Fractionation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart - radiation effects
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mastectomy - utilization
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Organ Size
Organs at Risk - radiation effects
Radiation Injuries - complications
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant - adverse effects
Risk factors
Thoracic Wall
Abstract
The risk of cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (HF-WBI) compared with conventional whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (CF-WBI) in women with left-sided breast cancer remains a concern. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an increase in hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI.
Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women = 80 years of age with early-stage breast cancer were treated with postoperative radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor, and treatment factors. Hospital administrative records identified baseline cardiac risk factors and other comorbidities. Factors between radiation therapy groups were balanced using a propensity-score model. The first event of a hospital admission for cardiac causes after radiation therapy was determined from hospitalization records. Ten- and 15-year cumulative hospital-related cardiac morbidity after radiation therapy was estimated for left- and right-sided cases using a competing risk approach.
The median follow-up was 13.2 years. For left-sided cases, 485 women were treated with CF-WBI, and 2221 women were treated with HF-WBI. Mastectomy was more common in the HF-WBI group, whereas boost was more common in the CF-WBI group. The CF-WBI group had a higher prevalence of diabetes. The 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes (95% confidence interval) was not different between the 2 radiation therapy regimens after propensity-score adjustment: 21% (19-22) with HF-WBI and 21% (17-25) with CF-WBI (P=.93). For right-sided cases, the 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes was also similar between the radiation therapy groups (P=.76).
There is no difference in morbidity leading to hospitalization from cardiac causes among women with left-sided early-stage breast cancer treated with HF-WBI or CF-WBI at 15-year follow-up.
PubMed ID
24606848 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adjuvant radiation trials for high-risk breast cancer patients: adequacy of lymphadenectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20381
Source
Ann Surg Oncol. 2000 Jun;7(5):357-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
A W Silberman
G P Sarna
D. Palmer
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgical Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA. aws222@aol.com
Source
Ann Surg Oncol. 2000 Jun;7(5):357-60
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy - surgery
Clinical Trials
Female
Humans
Lymph Node Excision
Lymphatic Metastasis
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Neoplasm, Residual
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The recently published, widely publicized adjuvant radiation trials from Denmark and Canada concluded that the addition of postoperative radiotherapy (XRT) to modified radical mastectomy (MRM) and adjuvant chemotherapy reduces locoregional recurrences and prolongs survival in high-risk premenopausal patients with breast cancer. Our thesis is that adequate lymphadenectomies were not performed in either study. Consequently, the conclusion to these studies is not applicable to those patients who have undergone adequate surgery. METHODS: To better assess adequate lymph node yield from an MRM, a retrospective review was performed on 215 consecutive patients treated surgically for invasive breast cancer. Data from this review were compared with the surgical data from the above-mentioned radiotherapy trials. RESULTS: In a group of 131 patients who had MRM, the average number of nodes removed was 26 (median, 25), and 75.5% of the specimens had 20 or more lymph nodes. In 73 patients who underwent segmental mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection, both the average and the median number of lymph nodes removed were 24, and 68.9% had 20 or more nodes. These data compare to the Danish radiation trial in which a median of 7 lymph nodes were removed (with 76% of the patients having 9 or fewer lymph nodes in the specimen) and to the Canadian radiation trial in which a median of 11 lymph nodes were removed. In addition, in our breast cancer patients with positive nodes (84 of 204; 41.2%), 45.2.% (38 of 84) had more than three positive nodes compared with 29.8% in the Danish study and 35% in the Canadian study. CONCLUSIONS: Our surgical data are sufficiently different from those of the Danish and Canadian studies to indicate that, in those studies, incomplete lymph node dissections were performed and that residual disease was left behind in the axilla in some or all of the patients. The addition of XRT in the setting of residual axillary disease may compensate for an inadequate operation and yield an acceptable oncological result; however, these studies did not provide an adequate comparison with a well-performed MRM without XRT. In the absence of documented benefit, XRT should not be routinely added if a complete lymph node dissection has been performed.
PubMed ID
10864343 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A long waiting time for radiotherapy. Not acceptable for patients with neoplasms]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25470
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Aug 20;109(23):2324-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-1989
Author
O G Klausen
J. Olofsson
B. Rosengren
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Aug 20;109(23):2324-5
Date
Aug-20-1989
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
Ear Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
English Abstract
Humans
Nose Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Radiotherapeutical resources in Norway are inadequate, which was further verified in this retrospective study of 73 patients with cancer of head and neck. The average duration of symptoms before the first ear-nose-throat examination was 153 days, and it took about 10 days after the examination to get the diagnosis. An unacceptably long time (mean 30 days) elapsed between the decision on therapy until the radiotherapy was initiated. There is no doubt that radiotherapy departments in Norway need better resources.
PubMed ID
2772899 View in PubMed
Less detail

An evidence-based estimate of the appropriate rate of utilization of radiotherapy for cancer of the cervix.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174435
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2005 Nov 1;63(3):812-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2005
Author
Nawaid Usmani
Farshad Foroudi
Jenny Du
Celine Zakos
Holly Campbell
Peter Bryson
William J Mackillop
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen's Cancer Research Institute, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2005 Nov 1;63(3):812-27
Date
Nov-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Gynecology
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Neoplasm Staging
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Radiation Oncology
Radiotherapy - utilization
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Abstract
Current estimates of the proportion of cancer patients who will require radiotherapy (RT) are based almost entirely on expert opinion. The objective of this study was to calculate the proportion of incident cases of cervical cancer that should receive RT by application of an evidence-based approach.
A systematic review of the literature was done to identify indications for RT for cervical cancer and to ascertain the level of evidence that supported each indication. A survey of Canadian gynecologic oncologists and radiation oncologists who treat cervical cancer was done to determine the level of acceptance of each indication among doctors who practice in the field. An epidemiologic approach was then used to estimate the incidence of each indication for RT in a typical North American population of patients with cervical cancer.
The systematic review of the literature identified 29 different indications for RT for cervical cancer. The majority of the 75 experts who responded to the mail survey stated that they "usually" or "always" recommended RT in all but one of the clinical situations that were identified as indications for RT on the basis of the systematic review. The analysis of epidemiologic data revealed that, in a typical North American population, 65.4% +/- 2.5% of cervical cancer cases will develop one or more indications for RT at some point in the course of the illness, 63.4% +/- 2.3% will develop indications for RT as part of their initial management, and 2.0% +/- 0.9% will develop indications for RT for progressive or recurrent disease. The effects of variations in case mix on the need for RT was examined by sensitivity analysis, which suggested that the maximum plausible range for the appropriate rate of utilization of RT was 54.3% to 67.9%. The proportion of cases that required RT was stage dependent: 10.6% +/- 1.2% in Stage IA, 74.9% +/- 1.3% in Stage IB, 100% in Stages II and III, and 97.2% +/- 1.1% in Stage IV.
This evidence-based estimate of the appropriate rate of use of RT for cervical cancer adds to the growing pool of knowledge about the need for RT that will ultimately provide a rational basis for long-term planning for RT programs and for auditing access to RT in the general population.
PubMed ID
15936156 View in PubMed
Less detail

An oral cavity carcinoma nomogram to predict benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113828
Source
JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2013 Jun;139(6):554-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Samuel J Wang
Snehal G Patel
Jatin P Shah
David P Goldstein
Jonathan C Irish
Andre L Carvalho
Luiz P Kowalski
Jennifer L Lockhart
John M Holland
Neil D Gross
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Medicine, KPV4, Oregon Health&Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd, Portland, OR 97239-3098, USA. wangsa@ohsu.edu
Source
JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2013 Jun;139(6):554-9
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brazil - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - pathology - radiotherapy - surgery
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy - surgery
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Neoplasm Staging
New York - epidemiology
Nomograms
Ontario - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Survival Rate
Abstract
After surgical resection for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, adjuvant radiotherapy may be recommended for patients at higher risk for locoregional recurrence, but it can be difficult to predict whether a particular patient will benefit.
To construct a model to predict which patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma would benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy.
We constructed several types of survival models using a set of 979 patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Covariates were age, sex, tobacco use, stage, grade, margins, and subsite. The best performing model was externally validated on a set of 431 patients.
The model was based on a set of 979 patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, including 563 from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, and 416 from the Hospital AC Camargo, São Paulo, Brazil. The validation set consisted of 431 patients from Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
The primary outcome measure of interest was locoregional recurrence-free survival.
The lognormal model showed the best performance per the Akaike information criterion. An online nomogram was built from this model that estimates locoregional failure-free survival with and without postoperative radiotherapy.
A web-based nomogram can be used as a decision aid for adjuvant treatment decisions for patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.
PubMed ID
23680917 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of volume segmentation in radiotherapy of adolescents; a treatment planning study by the Swedish Workgroup for Paediatric Radiotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114806
Source
Acta Oncol. 2014 Jan;53(1):126-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Ingrid Kristensen
Måns Agrup
Per Bergström
Jacob Engellau
Hedda Haugen
Ulla Martinsson
Kristina Nilsson
Zahra Taheri-Kadkhoda
Jack Lindh
Per Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Oncology, Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 2014 Jan;53(1):126-33
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Chordoma - pathology - radiotherapy
Female
Hodgkin Disease - pathology - radiotherapy
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Male
Pediatrics
Prognosis
Prostatic Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Radiotherapy Dosage
Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted
Radiotherapy, Conformal
Rhabdomyosarcoma - pathology - radiotherapy
Skull Base Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Sweden
Wilms Tumor - pathology - radiotherapy
Abstract
The variability in target delineation for similar cases between centres treating paediatric and adolescent patients, and the apparent differences in interpretation of radiotherapy guidelines in the treatment protocols encouraged us to perform a dummy-run study as a part of our quality assurance work. The aim was to identify and quantify differences in the segmentation of target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) and to analyse the treatment plans and dose distributions.
Four patient cases were selected: Wilm's tumour, Hodgkin's disease, rhabdomyosarcoma of the prostate and chordoma of the skull base. The five participating centres received the same patient-related material. They introduced the cases in their treatment planning system, delineated target volumes and OARs and created treatment plans. Dose-volume histograms were retrieved for relevant structures and volumes and dose metrics were derived and compared, e.g. target volumes and their concordance, dose homogeneity index (HI), treated and irradiated volumes, remaining volume at risk and relevant Vx and Dx values.
We found significant differences in target segmentation in the majority of the cases. The planning target volumes (PTVs) varied two- to four-fold and conformity indices were in the range of 0.3-0.6. This resulted in large variations in dose distributions to OARs as well as in treated and irradiated volumes even though the treatment plans showed good conformity to the PTVs. Potential reasons for the differences in target delineation were analysed.
Considerations of the growing child and difficulties in interpretation of the radiotherapy information in the treatment protocols were identified as reasons for the variation. As a result, clarified translated detailed radiotherapy guidelines for paediatric/adolescent patients have been recognised as a way to reduce this variation.
PubMed ID
23577745 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes of Canadian radiation oncologists towards post-lumpectomy radiotherapy for elderly women with stage I hormone-responsive breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147593
Source
Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol). 2010 Mar;22(2):97-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
E. Warner
E. Chow
A. Fairchild
E. Franssen
L. Paszat
E. Szumacher
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol). 2010 Mar;22(2):97-106
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Breast Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy - surgery
Canada
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast - pathology - radiotherapy - surgery
Female
Humans
Male
Mastectomy, Segmental
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent - pathology - radiotherapy - surgery
Physician's Practice Patterns
Postoperative Period
Radiation Oncology
Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Post-lumpectomy breast radiation is the standard of care for all patient subgroups. However, elderly women with stage I breast cancer on adjuvant tamoxifen therapy have a 4% risk of local recurrence after lumpectomy without adjuvant breast radiation. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes of Canadian radiation oncologists who treat breast cancer with respect to their use of adjuvant post-lumpectomy radiotherapy, and their willingness to implement a decision aid for this patient population.
The questionnaire was mailed to 141 Canadian radiation oncologists who treat breast cancer. The respondents were asked to complete an online survey consisting of four parts: (1) demographic information; (2) factors determining post-lumpectomy radiation treatment decisions; (3) hypothetical case scenarios; (4) interest in using a decision aid in their practice.
Among the 61 (43%) physicians who completed the survey, there was substantial response variation. After contraindications to radiotherapy, patient overall health and patient preference had the greatest influence on their decision to offer radiotherapy to this patient subgroup. Margin status and use of hormonal therapy were given less importance. For each of the case scenarios, 60-83% of physicians (depending on the case scenario) would offer the patient a choice; far fewer (12-57%) would be comfortable not irradiating. Sixty-four per cent of respondents welcomed the concept of a decision aid for this population.
Although there is significant variation in practice patterns and attitudes among radiation oncologists regarding post-lumpectomy radiotherapy for elderly, low-risk breast cancer patients, the vast majority value patient choice and would be willing to use a decision aid designed for this population in their practice.
PubMed ID
19883996 View in PubMed
Less detail

Basis for physician recommendations for adjuvant radioiodine therapy in early-stage thyroid carcinoma: principal findings of the Canadian-American thyroid cancer survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158552
Source
Endocr Pract. 2008 Mar;14(2):175-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Anna M Sawka
David P Goldstein
Lehana Thabane
James D Brierley
Richard W Tsang
Lorne Rotstein
Shamila Kamalanathan
Boyu Zhao
Amiram Gafni
Sharon Straus
Shereen Ezzat
Author Affiliation
Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Endocr Pract. 2008 Mar;14(2):175-84
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Carcinoma, Papillary - pathology - radiotherapy
Decision Making
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - therapeutic use
Neoplasm Staging
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Thyroid Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
United States
Abstract
To explore physician recommendations regarding radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) as adjuvant treatment in early-stage well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma (WDTC), their rationale for administration of RRA, and their willingness to involve patients' opinions in decision making about the use of RRA.
We surveyed a representative sample of specialty physicians in Canada and the United States and asked survey participants whether they would recommend adjuvant RRA after thyroidectomy for a 1.6-cm papillary thyroid carcinoma (Likert scale of agreement responses from 1 to 7; strong agreement >or=6). Factor analysis was performed to explore the rationale for recommendations. We asked whether physicians accepted the role of patients' preferences in decision making about administration of RRA, and backward conditional logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of strong acceptance.
The effective response rate for the survey was 56.3% (486 of 864), with 62.8% (295 of 470 respondents) strongly recommending RRA. Strong RRA recommendations were founded in opinions that RRA (1) decreases WDTC-related mortality and recurrence and (2) facilitates WDTC follow-up at low risk of adverse effects. Approximately a third of the survey respondents (152 of 474) strongly agreed with incorporation of patients' preferences in decision making regarding the use of RRA. Physicians without firm convictions about the efficacy of RRA in decreasing disease-related outcomes and those practicing in the United States were most likely to indicate strong support for incorporating patients' preferences in decision making about RRA.
The recommendations of physicians regarding use of adjuvant RRA are founded in beliefs in intervention efficacy and follow-up practices. Physicians in medical practice in the United States and those without strong convictions about RRA efficacy are most likely to incorporate patients' views in individualizing decisions about RRA therapy.
PubMed ID
18308655 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breast conserving surgery for invasive breast cancer: risk factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22180
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 1997 Mar;43(1):73-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
K. Dalberg
A. Mattsson
L E Rutqvist
U. Johansson
L. Riddez
K. Sandelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 1997 Mar;43(1):73-86
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy - surgery
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Humans
Mastectomy
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology - pathology
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To identify risk factors associated with an increased risk for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence following breast-conserving surgery, a cohort of 759 women with T1-T2 tumors were studied. The majority of the patients (88%) had received postoperative radiation therapy to the breast. Median follow-up time was 10 (range: 6-17) years. There was a 1-1.5% yearly increase in ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences. For women or = 50 ys, 9%. Node positive women had a cumulative breast recurrence rate of 25% versus 10% for node negative women. Ten years postoperatively, irradiated patients had a cumulative recurrence rate of 11% versus 26% when no irradiation was given. The beneficial effect of radiotherapy was substantial during the first four postoperative years. The relative risk for an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence during this period was 4.5 times higher than for non-irradiated patients. However, the protective effect of radiotherapy decreased with time. After ten years the relative risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was the same among irradiated and non-irradiated patients although the number of events during this period was low. Univariate analysis showed that seven factors were significantly associated with an increased risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence, namely age or = 50 were a low risk-group for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence, with a cumulative risk at 10 years of 9% without radiation therapy and 5% with breast irradiation.
PubMed ID
9065601 View in PubMed
Less detail

107 records – page 1 of 11.