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Active consideration: conceptualizing patient-provided support for spouse caregivers in the context of prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190673
Source
Qual Health Res. 2002 Apr;12(4):492-514
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Karen D Fergus
Ross E Gray
Margaret I Fitch
Manon Labrecque
Catherine Phillips
Author Affiliation
York University.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2002 Apr;12(4):492-514
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Female
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Ontario
Prostatectomy - nursing
Prostatic Neoplasms - nursing - psychology - surgery
Social Support
Abstract
In this study, the authors examine the under-investigated topic of patient-provided support for spouse caregivers. Thirty-four men with prostate cancer and their female partners were interviewed separately three times: before the man's radical prostatectomy, 8 to 10 weeks postsurgery, and 1 year postsurgery. The core category of active consideration encompassed 4 dimensions: easing spousal burden, keeping us up, maintaining connection, and considering spouse. Patient-provided support entails two overlapping tasks: minimizing the practical and emotional impact of the illness and tending to the caregiver's social-emotional needs. A theory expounding on the double bind of being both a patient and an agent in light of masculine socialization practices is articulated and brought to bear on the phenomenon of patient-provided support.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Nurs. 2003 Jan;6(1):3112546049
PubMed ID
11939250 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with cancer: experience of life and how it could be made easier.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178966
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2004 Jul-Aug;27(4):325-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hannele Hokkanen
Elina Eriksson
Outi Ahonen
Sanna Salantera
Author Affiliation
Helsinki Polytechnic Stadia, Tukholmankatu 10, 00290 Helsinki, Finland. hannele.hokkanen@stadia.fi
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2004 Jul-Aug;27(4):325-35
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health
Decision Making
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Goals
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Helping Behavior
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Morale
Needs Assessment
Negativism
Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Education as Topic
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Social Support
Abstract
This study is about what adolescents with cancer think about their life situation, the support they get, and the information they receive about their illness. The data for this qualitative and descriptive study were collected in 3 focus group interviews with 20 adolescents aged 13 to 18 years attending a cancer adjustment camp. Interpretation was based on the method of inductive content analysis. The adolescents' experiences of their current situation were analyzed into 5 categories: views on life here and now, negative experiences of self because of the illness, resources recognized in self, difficulties caused by the illness in relation to life around them, and resources identified in the world around. They made very little, if any, conscious effort to plan ahead for the future. The information received by the adolescents concerned their illness and its treatment here and now, various practical matters, as well as the future impacts of the illness and its treatments. Most of this information focused on the here and now, whereas the adolescents' information needs were mainly oriented to the future. As for the adolescents' chances to take part in making decisions about their care and life, the analysis yielded 6 categories: joint decision making, inadequate chances for decision making, independent decision making, illusion of decision making, reluctant to make decisions, and excluded from decision making. Finally, the adolescents' hopes for improvement were focused on staff activities, physical care facilities, chances to discuss and work through their experiences of the illness, and the support received from society.
PubMed ID
15292729 View in PubMed
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Advance care planning: re-visioning our ethical approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131678
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2011 Jun;43(2):18-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Carole A Robinson
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2011 Jun;43(2):18-37
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Care Planning
Canada
Ethics, Nursing
Freedom
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - nursing
Abstract
This qualitative study explored the applicability and usefulness of a promising advance care planning (ACP) intervention and examined the ACP process. Nine dyads (patients newly diagnosed with advanced lung cancer and a family member) participated in the ACP intervention, with evaluative interviews at 3 and 6 months after the intervention. All interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using constant comparison. The process was found not to be one of preparing a substitute decision-maker to speak for oneself and direct health care at a time when one is incapacitated; rather, the families engaged in a deeply relational process where meaning, values, and preferences were negotiated in conversation. ACP is theoretically rooted in a traditional notion of patient autonomy that is not aligned with the relational process that unfolded in this study. An approach that embraces relational autonomy is more congruent and provides a stronger foundation for meeting the needs of families.
PubMed ID
21888004 View in PubMed
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An analysis of the nurse practitioner role in palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191868
Source
Can J Nurs Leadersh. 2001 Nov-Dec;14(4):13-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
D. Williams
S. Sidani
Author Affiliation
Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Nurs Leadersh. 2001 Nov-Dec;14(4):13-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care
Humans
Neoplasms - nursing
Nurse practitioners
Nurse's Role
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Palliative Care
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the nature and contribution of the nurse practitioner (NP) role in an oncology palliative clinic. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from the practice of one NP. Data were obtained on the performance of the NP role functions. the characteristics of the patients seen by the NP, the interventions delivered by the NP, and the outcomes of care. Descriptive and content analyses were used to analyze the data. The results indicate that the NP in an oncology palliative care clinic engages primarily in the clinical component of the role. The emphasis is on symptom management, patient and family education and counseling, coordination of care, and maintaining continuity of care. The method followed in this case study to examine the contribution of the NP role could be used by other NPs to demonstrate the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of their care.
PubMed ID
11803941 View in PubMed
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An assessment of the influence of clinical breast examination reports on the interpretation of mammograms in a breast screening program. Ontario Breast Screening Program Radiologists Research Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206003
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 1998 Mar;48(1):65-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
J A Knight
A R Libstug
V. Moravan
N F Boyd
Author Affiliation
Division of Preventive Oncology, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Canada. julia_knight@cancercare.ou.ca
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 1998 Mar;48(1):65-71
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - nursing - radiography
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Mammography
Mass Screening
Medical Records
Nurse Clinicians
Ontario
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
The population-based Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP) provides two-yearly screening by both nurse examiner clinical breast examination (CBE) and two-view mammography to women aged 50 to 69. CBE alone accounts for about 5% of cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether CBE information affects radiologists' interpretation of mammography. Interpretation was defined by 1) radiologists' referral rates for diagnostic evaluation and 2) radiologists' accuracy in distinguishing cancer from non-cancer on mammograms. Mammograms were obtained from women randomly selected from those screened in the OBSP between 1990 and 1992. Selection was stratified by whether or not the nurse examiner had independently referred for diagnostic evaluation. Additional women diagnosed with breast cancer were selected to increase the precision of the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Each participating OBSP radiologist read a set of mammograms twice, approximately three weeks apart. The first reading was based on mammograms alone. At the second reading, the CBE report was included on the reporting form. Among 620 women referred by the nurse, radiologist referral rate increased from 37.7% to 40.8% (p = 0.079) when CBE information was available. Among the 637 not referred by the nurse, radiologist referral rate decreased from 29.8% to 25.6% (p = 0.005). There was little effect on the sensitivity and specificity of radiologist referral and the areas under the two ROC curves (with and without CBE information) were not significantly different (p = 0.571). Although there was some effect of CBE information on radiologists' pattern of referral, there was no effect on accuracy of cancer detection.
PubMed ID
9541190 View in PubMed
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An exploration of the experience of compassion fatigue in clinical oncology nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133808
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2011;21(2):91-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Beth Perry
Greg Toffner
Trish Merrick
Janice Dalton
Author Affiliation
Centre for Nursing and Health Studies, Athabasca University, 8708-116 Ave., Edmonton, AB T5B 0M6. bethp@athabascau.ca
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2011;21(2):91-105
Date
2011
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control - psychology
Canada
Empathy
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Narration
Neoplasms - nursing
Risk factors
Abstract
Compassion fatigue (CF) is "debilitating weariness brought about by repetitive, empathic responses to the pain and suffering of others" (LaRowe, 2005, p. 21). The work performed by oncology nurses, and the experiences of the people they care for, place oncology nurses at high risk for CF (Pierce et al., 2007; Ferrell & Coyle, 2008). Thus oncology nurses were chosen as the study focus. This paper details a descriptive exploratory qualitative research study that investigated the experience of CF in Canadian clinical oncology registered nurses (RNs). A conceptual stress process model by Aneshensel, Pearlin, Mullan, Zarit, and Whitlatch (1995) that considers caregivers' stress in four domains provided the study framework (see Figure 1). Nineteen study participants were recruited through an advertisement in the Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal (CONJ). The advertisement directed potential participants to a university-based online website developed for this study. Participants completed a questionnaire and wrote a narrative describing an experience with CF and submitted these through the secure research website. Data were analyzed thematically. Five themes include: defining CF, causes of CF, factors that worsen CF, factors that lessen CF, and outcomes of CF. Participants had limited knowledge about CF, about lack of external support, and that insufficient time to provide high quality, care may precipitate CF. The gap between quality of care nurses wanted to provide and what they were able to do, compounded by coexisting physical and emotional stress, worsened CF. CF was lessened by colleague support, work-life balance, connecting with others, acknowledgement, and maturity and experience. Outcomes of CF included profound fatigue of mind and body, negative effects on personal relationships, and considering leaving the specialty. Recommendations that may enhance oncology nurse well-being are provided.
PubMed ID
21661623 View in PubMed
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An exploration of the patient navigator role: perspectives of younger women with breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105501
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014 Jan 1;41(1):77-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2014
Author
Allison E Pedersen
Thomas F Hack
Susan E McClement
Jill Taylor-Brown
Author Affiliation
Winnipeg Regional Health Authority Palliative Care Program.
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014 Jan 1;41(1):77-88
Date
Jan-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Anxiety - etiology
Breast Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Oncology Nursing
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Navigation
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Role
Social Support
Social Work
Uncertainty
Young Adult
Abstract
To delineate the role of the oncology patient navigator, drawing from the experiences and descriptions of younger women with breast cancer.
Interpretive, descriptive, qualitative research design.
Participants' homes, researcher's home, and via telephone, all in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
12 women aged 50 years or younger who were diagnosed with breast cancer within the last three years.
Face-to-face semistructured interviews explored patient experiences with the cancer care system, including problems encountered, unmet needs, and opinions about the functions of the patient navigator role. The audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and data were broken down and inductively coded into four categories. Constant comparative techniques also were used during analysis.
The role of the oncology patient navigator included two facets: "Processual facets," with the subthemes assigned to me at diagnosis, managing the connection, mapping the process, practical support, and quarterbacking my entire journey; and "Personal qualities: The essentials," with the subthemes empathetic care tenor, knowing the cancer system, and understanding the medical side of breast cancer.
Despite the tremendous effort directed toward enhancing care for younger women undergoing treatment for breast cancer, gaps continue to exist. Younger women with breast cancer require a care approach providing ongoing dialogue, teaching, and emotional support from the point of diagnosis through treatment, including transitions of care within the oncology setting and back to their primary care practitioner.
Oncology nurse navigators are well positioned to provide patients with anticipatory guidance from diagnosis to the end of treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014 Jan 1;41(1):89-9124368242
PubMed ID
24368241 View in PubMed
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An international perspective of active euthanasia: attitudes of nurses in seven countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23962
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 1993 Aug;30(4):301-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
A J Davis
B. Davidson
M. Hirschfield
S. Lauri
J Y Lin
A. Norberg
L. Phillips
E. Pitman
C H Shen
R. Vander Laan
Author Affiliation
University of California, San Francisco.
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 1993 Aug;30(4):301-10
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Australia
Canada
China
Dementia - nursing
Ethics, Nursing
Euthanasia - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Euthanasia, Active
Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary
Finland
Humans
Internationality
Israel
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - nursing
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Nursing, Supervisory - statistics & numerical data
Religion
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
United States
Abstract
This exploratory study examines the ethical justification that cancer care and dementia care nurses gave for active voluntary euthanasia. A convenient sample of 319 nurses working in seven countries was interviewed using a structured interview guide. The great majority of the nurses could not ethically justify active voluntary euthanasia. Even if the law changed, only 96 of the total sample viewed active voluntary euthanasia as ethical. For those nurses who could ethically justify active voluntary euthanasia, the majority did so because of the patients' suffering.
PubMed ID
8375973 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1991 Oct 16;91(42):18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-16-1991

340 records – page 1 of 34.