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Absorbing information about a child's incurable cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96768
Source
Oncology. 2010;78(3-4):259-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Patrizia Lannen
Joanne Wolfe
Jennifer Mack
Erik Onelov
Ullakarin Nyberg
Ulrika Kreicbergs
Author Affiliation
Phyllis F. Cantor Center, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Oncology. 2010;78(3-4):259-66
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Death
Bereavement
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality - psychology
Parents
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess parents' ability to absorb information that their child's cancer was incurable and to identify factors associated with parents' ability to absorb this information. PATIENTS AND METHODS: An anonymous mail-in questionnaire study was performed as a population-based investigation in Sweden between August and October of 2001. 449 parents who lost a child to cancer 4-9 years earlier (response rate 80%) completed the survey. 191 (43%) of the bereaved parents were fathers and 251 (56%) were mothers. RESULTS: Sixty percent of parents (n = 258) reported that they were able to absorb the information that their child's illness was incurable. Parents were better able to absorb this information when the information was given in an appropriate manner (RR 1.6; CI 1.3-2.0), when they shared their problems with others during the child's illness course (RR 1.4; CI 1.1-1.8) and when they had no history of depression (RR 1.3; CI 1.0-1.8). Parents who reported that they were able to absorb the information were more likely to have expressed their farewells to the child in their desired manner (RR 1.3; CI 1.0-1.5). CONCLUSIONS: Parents who received information that their child's illness was incurable in an appropriate manner are more likely to absorb that information. Whether or not parents are able to absorb the information that their child's cancer is incurable has implications in terms of preparation for the child's impending death.
PubMed ID
20523086 View in PubMed
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[A reply on mammographic screening. How long do we have to wait to see the affect on survival?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21050
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 14;96(15):1882-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-1999
Author
G. Sjönell
L. Ståhle
Author Affiliation
Aydelningen för klinisk farmakologi, Huddinge sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 14;96(15):1882-3
Date
Apr-14-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - psychology
Female
Humans
Mammography
Mass Screening
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
10319655 View in PubMed
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Associations between faith, distress and mental adjustment--a Danish survivorship study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118388
Source
Acta Oncol. 2013 Feb;52(2):364-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Christine Tind Johannessen-Henry
Isabelle Deltour
Pernille Envold Bidstrup
Susanne O Dalton
Christoffer Johansen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Survivorship, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. tind@cancer.dk
Source
Acta Oncol. 2013 Feb;52(2):364-71
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - physiology
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality - psychology - rehabilitation
Questionnaires
Religion
Religion and Psychology
Spirituality
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Survival Rate
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Several studies have suggested that religion and spirituality are important for overcoming psychological distress and adjusting mentally to cancer, but these studies did not differentiate between spiritual well-being and specific aspects of faith. We examined the extent to which spiritual well-being, the faith dimension of spiritual well-being and aspects of performed faith are associated with distress and mental adjustment among cancer patients.
In a cross-sectional design, 1043 survivors of various cancers filled in a questionnaire on spiritual well-being (FACIT-Sp-12), specific aspects of faith ('belief in a god', 'belief in a god with whom I can talk' and 'experiences of god or a higher power'), religious community and church attendance (DUREL), distress (POMS-SF), adjustment to cancer (Mini-MAC) and sociodemographic factors. Linear regression models were used to analyze the associations between exposure (spiritual well-being and specific faith aspects) and outcome (distress and adjustment to cancer) with adjustment for age, gender, cancer diagnosis and physical and social well-being.
Higher spiritual well-being was associated with less total distress (ß = -0.79, CI -0.92; -0.66) and increased adjustment to cancer (fighting spirit, anxious preoccupation, helplessness-hopelessness). Specific aspects of faith were associated with high confusion-bewilderment and tension-anxiety, but also lower score on vigor-activity, and with higher anxious-preoccupation, both higher and lower cognitive avoidance, but also more fighting spirit.
As hypothesized, spiritual well-being were associated with less distress and better mental adjustment. However, specific aspects of faith were both positively and negatively associated with distress and mental adjustment. The results illustrate the complexity of associations between spiritual well-being and specific aspects of faith with psychological function among cancer survivors.
PubMed ID
23215830 View in PubMed
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Bereavement stressors and psychosocial well-being of young adults following the loss of a parent - A cross-sectional survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295577
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2018 Aug; 35:33-38
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
Tina Lundberg
Ulla Forinder
Mariann Olsson
Carl Johan Fürst
Kristofer Årestedt
Anette Alvariza
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society/Division of Social Work, Karolinska Institutet, 141 83, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Health Care Sciences/Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Box 11189, 100 61, Stockholm, Sweden; Function Area in Social Work and Health, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: tina.lundberg@esh.se.
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2018 Aug; 35:33-38
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Children - psychology
Bereavement
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Grief
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Neoplasms - mortality - psychology
Parents
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The knowledge about young adults who have lost a parent to cancer is limited, and to reach a broader understanding about this group, this study used the Dual Process Model of Coping with Bereavement (Stroebe and Schut, 1999) as a theoretical framework. The purpose of this study was to describe loss- and restoration-oriented bereavement stressors and psychosocial wellbeing of young adults following the loss of a parent to cancer.
This survey used baseline data from a longitudinal study. Young adults, aged 16-28 years, who lost a parent to cancer more than two months earlier and agreed to participate in support groups held at three palliative care services in Sweden, responded to a comprehensive theory-based study-specific questionnaire.
Altogether, 77 young adults (64 women and 13 men) answered the questionnaire an average of five-to-eight months after the loss. Twenty percent (n?=?15) had not been aware of their parent's impending death at all or only knew a few hours before the death, and 65% (n?=?50) did not expect the death when it occurred. The young adults reported low self-esteem (n?=?58, 76%), mild to severe anxiety (n?=?55, 74%), mild to severe depression (n?=?23, 31%) and low life satisfaction.
Young adults reported overall poor psychosocial wellbeing following bereavement. The unexpectedness and unawareness of the parent's imminent death, i.e., loss-oriented bereavement stressors, might influence psychosocial wellbeing. Despite these reports, restoration-oriented stressors, such as support from family and friends, helped them to cope with the loss.
PubMed ID
30057081 View in PubMed
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Biological, physical, mental and social dimensions of breast cancer: information based on routine case notes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222227
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1993;29A(15):2152-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
K. Holli
M. Hakama
Author Affiliation
Oncology Clinic, Tampere University Hospital, Kangasala, Finland.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1993;29A(15):2152-5
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Abstract
551 patients were diagnosed with breast cancer in Tampere University Hospital district, Finland between 1977 and 1980. The number of follow-up visits during the first 5 years was 8248. The biological, physical, mental and social dimensions of breast cancer were measured by death, recurrence of disease, Karnofsky score, physical or mental symptoms, and sick leave. The prevalence rates of an event and the incidence rates of the appearance or disappearance of an event were used to determine the indicators for these different dimensions of breast cancer. The study was based on hospital case notes. Data on death, recurrence, sick leave and Karnofsky score were well recorded, but physical or mental symptoms were recorded infrequently. There was a 4-fold difference between the highest and lowest prevalence for the different dimensions, but the trends were similar by follow-up time. The variation was also large for the incidence rates but the trends differed with length of follow-up time. The biological, physical, mental and social consequences of breast cancer differ in magnitude and have different trends over time, indicating that breast cancer is a different disease depending on the dimension and on the indicator under consideration.
PubMed ID
8297655 View in PubMed
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The breath of life - womens' experiences of breathing adapted radiation therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119009
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2013 Jun;17(3):354-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
A. Holst-Hansson
K. Sjövall
E. Idvall
I. Bolmsjö
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Society, Malmö University, S-205 06 Malmö, Sweden. Annette.Holst.Hansson@mah.se
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2013 Jun;17(3):354-9
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - psychology - radiotherapy - surgery
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Life Change Events
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Qualitative Research
Radiotherapy - methods - psychology
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant - psychology
Respiration
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Women's health
Abstract
To describe and analyze how women with breast cancer experience breathing adapted radiation therapy (BART) and to explore how women manage daily radiation therapy.
Individual interviews were conducted with 20 women treated with BART for breast cancer concerning their perception of radiation therapy. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.
'The breath of life' was the overall theme, as the women experienced the breathing as a way in which to influence their treatment and thus their survival. 'Participating in one's treatment, for good or ill', was the main category with four subcategories, 'Knowing one has done something good', 'Getting an extra bonus - healthwise', 'The experience of being in control' and 'Being in a high-technology environment'. The breathing technique became the strategy by which they could manage their treatment and gave them a sense of participation which led to a feeling of being in control. The women also felt that breathing benefited their health both mentally and physically. The high-technology environment was experienced as both hopeful and frightening.
Survival or increasing the chances of survival, are of ultimate importance for a woman with breast cancer. BART requires commitment from the women, which was perceived as offering them an opportunity to participate in their own treatment, for their survival. Increasing the women's possibilities to participate in their treatment benefits their health and welfare during an otherwise turbulent time and allow the rehabilitation process to start during treatment.
PubMed ID
23149274 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality among elderly patients with brief psychotic disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190326
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2002 May;17(5):488-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002

Cancer survival in parents who lost a child: a nationwide study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9717
Source
Br J Cancer. 2003 Jun 2;88(11):1698-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2-2003
Author
J. Li
C. Johansen
J. Olsen
Author Affiliation
The Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Aarhus, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, Denmark. jl@soci.au.dk
Source
Br J Cancer. 2003 Jun 2;88(11):1698-701
Date
Jun-2-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bereavement
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality - psychology
Parents - psychology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - mortality
Survival Rate
Abstract
Psychological stress has been suggested to shorten cancer survival, but few studies have examined the effect of parental bereavement, and the results have been inconsistent. We identified all 21 062 parents who lost a child in Denmark from 1980 to 1996 and among them, 1630 parents with subsequent incident cancer formed the exposed cohort. We recruited 6237 incident cancer patients from a group of 293 745 randomly selected unexposed parents matched on family structure at the same time as the bereaved parents. All incident cancers in the two cohorts were followed to the end of 1997, or until they died. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to evaluate the hazard ratio (HR) of dying in exposed parents with cancer. The overall HR of dying from an incident cancer in exposed parents was 1.23 (95% confidence interval 1.03-1.47) compared to parents with cancer who did not lose a child. The HRs were nearly identical to those in the unexposed parents for site-specific cancers like lung cancer, breast cancer, and other groups of cancers like cancers in all digestive organs, smoking-related cancers, alcohol-related cancers, hormone-related cancers, virus/immune-related cancers, and lymphatic/haematopoietic cancers. Death of a child is not a strong prognostic factor for cancer survival among parents diagnosed with cancer after the bereavement. However, a small impairment in overall cancer survival cannot be ruled out.
PubMed ID
12771983 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Aug 26;130(16):1598
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-2010
Author
Eivind Meland
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisinske fag Universitetet i Bergen, Kalfarveien 31, 5018 Bergen, Norway.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Aug 26;130(16):1598
Date
Aug-26-2010
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colonoscopy - adverse effects
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality - psychology
False Positive Reactions
Humans
Mass Screening - adverse effects - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
PubMed ID
20805854 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Colorectal cancer screening--at last discussed!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100218
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Oct 21;130(20):2012
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-21-2010

48 records – page 1 of 5.