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1118 records – page 1 of 112.

A 3-year follow-up of sun behavior in patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106960
Source
JAMA Dermatol. 2014 Feb;150(2):163-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Luise Winkel Idorn
Pameli Datta
Jakob Heydenreich
Peter Alshede Philipsen
Hans Christian Wulf
Author Affiliation
Dermatological Research Department D92, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
JAMA Dermatol. 2014 Feb;150(2):163-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Melanoma - etiology - pathology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - etiology - pathology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Time Factors
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Abstract
IMPORTANCE UV radiation (UVR) exposure is the primary environmental risk factor for developing cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). OBJECTIVE To measure changes in sun behavior from the first until the third summer after the diagnosis of CMM using matched controls as a reference. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Three-year follow-up, observational, case-control study performed from May 7 to September 22, 2009, April 17 to September 15, 2010, and May 6 to July 31, 2011, at a university hospital in Denmark of 21 patients with CMM and 21 controls matched to patients by sex, age, occupation, and constitutive skin type participated in the study. Exposure to UVR was assessed the first and second summers (n=20) and the first and third summers (n=22) after diagnosis. Data from 40 participants were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Exposure to UVR was assessed by personal electronic UVR dosimeters that measured time-related UVR in standard erythema dose (SED) and corresponding sun diaries (mean, 74 days per participant each participation year). RESULTS Patients' daily UVR dose and UVR dose in connection with various behaviors increased during follow-up (quantified as an increase in daily UVR dose each year; all days: mean, 0.3 SED; 95% CI, 0.05-0.5 SED; days with body exposure: mean, 0.6 SED; 95% CI, 0.07-1.2 SED; holidays: mean, 1.2 SED; 95% CI, 0.3-2.1 SED; days abroad: 1.9 SED; 95% CI, 0.4-3.4 SED; and holidays with body exposure: mean, 2.3 SED; 95% CI, 1.1-3.4 SED). After the second year of follow-up, patients' UVR dose was higher than that of controls, who maintained a stable UVR dose. No difference was found between groups in the number of days with body exposure or the number of days using sunscreen in the second and third years of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our findings suggest that patients with CMM do not maintain a cautious sun behavior in connection with an increase in UVR exposure, especially on days with body exposure, when abroad, and on holidays.
PubMed ID
24080851 View in PubMed
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The 4th Copenhagen Workshop on Carcinoma in situ and Cancer of the Testis: concluding remarks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21725
Source
APMIS. 1998 Jan;106(1):259-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
D M de Kretser
I. Damjanov
Author Affiliation
Institute of Reproduction and Development, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
Source
APMIS. 1998 Jan;106(1):259-63
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Carcinoma in Situ - etiology - pathology - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Testicular Neoplasms - etiology - pathology - physiopathology
Tumor Markers, Biological
Abstract
The 4th Copenhagen Workshop "Carcinoma in situ Germ Cell and Testicular Cancer: Molecular and Endocrine Aspects" was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, May 18-21, 1997. This paper discusses the major themes that emerged during the workshop and summarises the most important contributions.
PubMed ID
9524588 View in PubMed
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23 years of the discovery of Helicobacter pylori: is the debate over?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16662
Source
Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob. 2005;4:17
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Niyaz Ahmed
Source
Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob. 2005;4:17
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Helicobacter Infections - complications
Helicobacter pylori - pathogenicity
Humans
Peptic Ulcer - etiology
Stomach - microbiology
Stomach Neoplasms - etiology
Abstract
The Gram negative curved bacillus H. pylori has become the prize bug of all times. Barry Marshall and Robin Warren the two discoverers of this organism have been awarded with this year's Nobel Prize. The Nobel committee at the Karolinska Institute of Sweden has selected this paradigm shift discovery of 1982 as the most impacting in medical sciences. This award has surprised many as the Nobel assembly has selected this 'Robert Koch styled medical detective work' for the prize as compared to many outstanding basic research stories on the waitlist. This editorial briefly touches the significant impact of H. pylori on gastroduodenal management and the path forward as the bug has become quite controversial in recent times.
PubMed ID
16262889 View in PubMed
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A 32-year longitudinal study of alcohol consumption in Swedish women: Reduced risk of myocardial infarction but increased risk of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275258
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):153-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Dominique Hange
Jóhann A Sigurdsson
Cecilia Björkelund
Valter Sundh
Calle Bengtsson
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):153-62
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Beer
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Ethanol - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - prevention & control
Neoplasms - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess associations between the intake of different types of alcoholic beverages and the 32-year incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and cancer, as well as mortality, in a middle-aged female population.
Prospective study.
Gothenburg, Sweden, population about 430 000.
Representative sample of a general population of women (1462 in total) aged 38 to 60 years in 1968-1969, followed up to the ages of 70 to 92 years in 2000-2001.
Associations between alcohol intake and later risk of mortality and morbidity from myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and cancer, studied longitudinally.
During the follow-up period, 185 women developed myocardial infarction, 162 developed stroke, 160 women became diabetic, and 345 developed cancer. Women who drank beer had a 30% lower risk (hazards ratio (HR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-0.95) of developing myocardial infarcion and almost half the risk (HR 0.51 CI 0.33-0.80). A significant association between increased risk of death from cancer and high spirits consumption was also shown (hazards ratio [HR] 1.47, CI 1.06-2.05).
Women with moderate consumption of beer had a reduced risk of developing myocardial infarction. High spirits consumption was associated with increased risk of cancer mortality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26194171 View in PubMed
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The 1891-1920 birth cohort of Quebec chrysotile miners and millers: development from 1904 and mortality to 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210233
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):13-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
F D Liddell
A D McDonald
J C McDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University Montreal, Canada.
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):13-36
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Asbestosis - etiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - etiology - mortality
Mining - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper draws together the mortality experience for a cohort of some 11000 male Quebec Chrysotile miners and millers, reported at intervals since 1971 and now again updated. Of the 10918 men in the complete cohort, 1138 were lost to view, almost all never traced after employment of only a month or two before 1935; the other 9780 men were traced into 1992. Of these, 8009 (82%) are known to have died: 657 from lung cancer, 38 from mesotheliona, 1205 from other malignant disease, 108 from pneumoconiosis and 561 from other non-malignant respiratory diseases (excluding tuberculosis). After early fluctuations. SMRs (all causes) against Quebec rates have been reasonably steady since about 1945. For men first employed in Asbestos, mine or factory, they were very much what might have been expected for a blue collar population without any hazardous exposure. SMRs in the Thetford Mines area were almost 8% higher, but in line with anecdotal evidence concerning socio-economic status. At exposures below 300 (million particles per cubic foot) x years, (mpcf.y), equivalent to roughly 1000 (fibres/ml) x years-or, say, 10 years in the 1940s at 80 (fibres/ml)-findings were as follows. There were no discernible associations of degree of exposure and SMRs, whether for all causes of death or for all the specific cancer sites examined. The average SMRs were 1.07 (all causes), and 1.16, 0.93, 1.03 and 1.21, respectively, for gastric, other abdominal, laryngeal and lung cancer. Men whose exposures were less then 300 mpcf.y suffered almost one-half of the 146 deaths from pneumoconiosis or mesothelioma; the elimination of these two causes would have reduced these men's SMR (all causes) from 1.07 to approximately 1.06. Thus it is concluded from the viewpoint of mortality that exposure in this industry to less than 300 mpcf.y has been essentially innocuous, although there was a small risk or pneumoconiosis or mesothelioma. Higher exposures have, however, led to excesses, increasing with degree of exposure, of mortality from all causes, and from lung cancer and stomach cancer, but such exposures, of at least 300 mpcf.y, are several orders of magnitude more severe than any that have been seen for many years. The effects of cigarette smoking were much more deleterious than those of dust exposure, not only for lung cancer (the SMR for smokers of 20+ cigarettes a day being 4.6 times higher than that for non-smokers), but also for stomach cancer (2.0 times higher), laryngeal cancer (2.9 times higher), and-most importantly-for all causes (1.6 times higher).
Notes
Comment In: Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):3-129072948
Comment In: Ann Occup Hyg. 2001 Jun;45(4):329-35; author reply 336-811414250
PubMed ID
9072947 View in PubMed
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Abnormal Papanicolaou smear. A population-based study of risk factors in Greenlandic and Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25362
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(1):79-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
S K Kjaer
P. Poll
H. Jensen
G. Engholm
B J Haugaard
C. Teisen
R B Christensen
K A Möller
B F Vestergaard
E M de Villiers
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(1):79-86
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Contraception Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Greenland
Herpes Genitalis - complications
Humans
Papillomavirus
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior
Smoking
Tumor Virus Infections - complications
Uterine Cervical Dysplasia - diagnosis - etiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - etiology
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
Possible risk factors for abnormal Papanicolaou smear were investigated in a population-based cross-sectional study. From Nuuk (Greenland) and Nykøbing Falster (Denmark), random samples of 800 women aged 20-39 years were drawn. Totals of 586 and 661 women were included in Greenland and Denmark, respectively. All women went through a personal interview, and had a gynecologic examination including a PAP smear and cervical swab for HPV analysis. A blood sample was taken for analysis of HSV type specific antibodies. Multiple sexual partners was the most important risk factor for abnormal cervical cytology (OR = 4.2). An infectious etiology was also indirectly supported by a relatively protective effect of barrier contraceptive methods (OR = 0.6). The simultaneous finding of HPV 16/18 as a significant risk factor (OR = 2.4) cannot be taken uncritically as support for a causal effect of this HPV type, since such a relationship between cytological changes of the cervix and HPV infection could also emerge if the positive PAP smear was not just a measure of intra-epithelial neoplasia but also an expression of the infection itself on the cervix.
PubMed ID
2161172 View in PubMed
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Absence of association between reproductive variables and the risk of breast cancer in young women in Sweden and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25167
Source
Br J Cancer. 1990 Jul;62(1):122-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1990
Author
H O Adami
R. Bergström
E. Lund
O. Meirik
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1990 Jul;62(1):122-6
Date
Jul-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous
Age Factors
Breast Feeding
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Menstrual Cycle
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Parity
Pregnancy
Reproduction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
A population-based case-control study was conducted in Sweden and Norway to analyse possible associations between breast cancer occurring before the age of 45 and several different characteristics of the women's reproductive life. A total of 422 (89.2%) of all eligible patients, and 527 (80.6%) of all eligible controls were interviewed. In univariate analyses, different characteristics of child-bearing (parity, age at first birth, years between last birth and diagnosis, duration of breast-feeding, and number of induced and spontaneous abortions), measures of the fertile or ovulating period (age at menarche, years between menarche and first pregnancy, and estimates of the menstruation span) and symptoms of anovulatory cycles or infertility were all seemingly unrelated to, or at most weakly associated with breast cancer. Adjustment for possible confounding factors in multivariate analyses resulted in largely unaltered risk estimates with odds ratios close to unity and without any significant trends when the exposure variables were studied in categorised or in continuous form. We conclude that reproductive factors did not explain the occurrence of breast cancer before the age of 45 in this population.
PubMed ID
2390471 View in PubMed
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Absence of RAS and p53 mutations in thyroid carcinomas of children after Chernobyl in contrast to adult thyroid tumours.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21720
Source
Br J Cancer. 1998 Mar;77(6):952-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
B. Suchy
V. Waldmann
S. Klugbauer
H M Rabes
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pathology, University of Munich, Germany.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1998 Mar;77(6):952-5
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adult
Age Factors
Base Sequence
Byelarus
Child
Exons
Gene Rearrangement
Genes, Regulator
Genes, p53
Genes, ras
Humans
Mutagenesis
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Neoplasms - etiology - genetics
Ukraine
Abstract
Thyroid carcinomas of an additional series of 34 children exposed to radioactive fall-out after the Chernobyl reactor accident were analysed for mutations in the H-, K- and N-RAS and the p53 gene. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization, single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and direct sequencing did not disclose mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61 of RAS genes nor mutations in exons 5, 7 and 8 of p53. Considering the recently reported high prevalence of RET rearrangements of the PTC3 type in childhood tumours after Chernobyl (Klugbauer et al, 1995, Oncogene 11: 2459-2467), it follows that RET rearrangements are the most relevant molecular aberration in these radiation-induced tumours. RAS or p53 mutations do not play a role in childhood thyroid carcinogenesis after Chernobyl.
PubMed ID
9528840 View in PubMed
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[Abstract of the Environmental and Health Administration's Report from Frederica: relationship between air pollution and lung cancer not proven]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27458
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1979 Feb 14;79(7):17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-1979
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1979 Feb 14;79(7):17
Date
Feb-14-1979
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Denmark
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology
PubMed ID
254454 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A consensus statement for the prevention of melanoma. Changes in sunbathing habits are most important. Tanning salons are too popular among young people].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216688
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Dec 14;91(50):4778-82
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-14-1994

1118 records – page 1 of 112.