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834 records – page 1 of 84.

Source
Health Rep. 1992;4(2):161-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
E M Illing
L A Gaudette
J. McLaughlin
M. McBride
Author Affiliation
Health Status Section, Canadian Centre for Health Information, Statistics Canada.
Source
Health Rep. 1992;4(2):161-74
Date
1992
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Survival Rate
Abstract
In Canada, it is estimated that in 1992 115,000 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed. This total excludes 47,200 estimated new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer. The number of new cases is increasing by about 3,000 per year due partly to the aging population, improved registration, earlier detection of cancer and real increases in the incidence of some types of cancer. It is estimated that there will be 58,300 cancer deaths in 1992. By 1992, prostate cancer will have overtaken lung cancer as the leading cancer among men in the four western provinces while lung cancer is expected to exceed breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer deaths among women in some provinces, notably British Columbia. In British Columbia, the relative survival rates for most cancers improved between the periods 1970 to 1974 and 1980 to 1984. However, stomach, lung and pancreatic cancers, which have low survival rates, showed little improvement. This article is based on 1992 estimates of cancer incidence and mortality, cancer trends in Canada and relative cancer survival rates in British Columbia, found in Canadian Cancer Statistics 1992. This publication was prepared at Statistics Canada through a collaborative effort involving the Canadian Cancer Society, Health and Welfare Canada and the provincial/territorial cancer registries.
PubMed ID
1421019 View in PubMed
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[Adenocarcinoma of the appendix in Iceland 1990-2009. A population based study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146374
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Oct;97(10):537-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Halla Vidarsdottir
Jón Gunnlaugur Jónasson
Pall Helgi Möller
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Oct;97(10):537-42
Date
Oct-2011
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - mortality - secondary - therapy
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Appendectomy
Appendiceal Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - pathology - therapy
Biopsy
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Colectomy
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Adenocarcinoma of the appendix is less than 0.5% of all gastrointestinal cancers. The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence, symptoms, pathology and treatment of appendiceal adenocarcinoma in a well defined cohort as well as the prognosis of the patients.
This is a retrospective study on all patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the appendix in Iceland from 1990-2009. Information on epidemiological factors, survival and treatment was collected. All histological material was reviewed. Overall survival was estimated with median follow up of 15 months (range, 0-158).
A total of 22 patients were diagnosed with appendiceal adenocarinoma in the study period (median age 63 yrs, range: 30-88, 50% males). Age-standardized incidence was 0.4/100,000/year. The most common symptom was abdominal pain (n=10). Eight patients had clinical signs of appendicitis. Most patients were diagnosed at operation or at pathological examination but one patient was diagnosed at autopsy. Five patients had an appendectomy and 11 a right hemicolectomy. One patient was not operated on and in three patients only a biopsy was taken. Twelve patients had chemotherapy and seven of them for metastatic disease. Eight patients had adenocarcinoma, seven mucinous adenocarcinoma, three signet ring adenocarcinoma, one mixed goblet cell carcinoid and mucinous adenocarcinoma,one mixed adenocarcinoma and signet ring adenocarcinoma and two a mucinous tumour of unknown malignant potential. In eight cases the tumor originated in adenoma. Most of the patients had a stage IV disease (n=13), three stage III, three stage II and three stage I. Operative mortality was 4.8% (n=1). Disease specific five year survival was 54% but overall five year survival was 44% respectively.
Adenocarcinoma of the appendix is a rare disease. No patients were diagnosed pre-operatively. Over half of the patients presented with stage IV disease.
PubMed ID
21998147 View in PubMed
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Adjusting and comparing survival curves by means of an additive risk model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21578
Source
Lifetime Data Anal. 1998;4(2):149-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
P H Zahl
O O Aalen
Author Affiliation
Section of Medical Statistics, University of Oslo. perhz@biostat.washington.edu
Source
Lifetime Data Anal. 1998;4(2):149-68
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Survival curves may be adjusted for covariates using Aalen's additive risk model. Survival curves may be compared by taking the ratio of two adjusted survival curves; the ratio is denoted the generalized relative survival rate. Adjusting both survival curves for all but one of a common set of covariates gives the partial relative survival rate, which measures the covariate-specific contribution to the generalized relative survival rate. The generalized and partial relative survival rates have interpretations similar to the traditional relative survival rates frequently used in cancer epidemiology. In fact, the traditional relative survival rate can be generalized to a regression context using the additive risk model. This population-adjusted relative survival rate is an alternative and useful method for removing confounding effects of age, cohorts, and sex. The authors use a data set of malignant melanoma patients diagnosed from 1965 to 1974 in Norway. The 25-year survival of 1967 individuals is studied.
PubMed ID
9658773 View in PubMed
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Adult Overweight and Survival from Breast and Colorectal Cancer in Swedish Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310431
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2019 09; 28(9):1518-1524
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2019
Author
Melina Arnold
Hadrien Charvat
Heinz Freisling
Hwayoung Noh
Hans-Olov Adami
Isabelle Soerjomataram
Elisabete Weiderpass
Author Affiliation
Section of Cancer Surveillance, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), Lyon, France. arnoldm@iarc.fr.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2019 09; 28(9):1518-1524
Date
09-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Overweight
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
The impact of overweight duration and intensity during adulthood on the prognosis after a cancer diagnosis remains largely unknown. We investigated this association in Swedish women with breast and colorectal cancer.
A cohort of 47,051 women from the Swedish Lifestyle and Health Study was included, of whom 1,241 developed postmenopausal breast (mean age at diagnosis, 57.5 years) and 259 colorectal (mean age at diagnosis, 59.1 years) cancer. Trajectories of body mass index (BMI) between ages 20 and 50 years were estimated for the full cohort using a quadratic growth model and studied in relation to risk of death from any cause using multivariate Cox regression models among cancer survivors.
Compared with patients with cancer who were never overweight (BMI
PubMed ID
31201224 View in PubMed
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Age at first childbirth and breast cancer survival: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307416
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2020 Jan 06; 13(1):9
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-06-2020
Author
Johanna Aurin
Henrik Thorlacius
Salma Tunå Butt
Author Affiliation
Institution of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital Malmo, Lund University, 205 02, Malmö, Sweden. johannaeaurin@gmail.com.
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2020 Jan 06; 13(1):9
Date
Jan-06-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Parturition
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Late age at first childbirth is a well-established risk factor for breast cancer. Previous studies have, however, shown conflicting results to whether late age at first childbirth also influences the prognosis of breast cancer survival. The aim of this study was to examine age at first birth in relation to survival after breast cancer diagnosis.
We used information from the Malmö Diet and Cancer study. At baseline 17,035 women were included. All women were followed from the year they developed breast cancer until they either died or until the end of follow-up. All women were asked how many children they had given birth to and were then divided into different groups, =?20, >?20 to ?=?25, >?25 to ?=?30 and >?30. Nulliparous women form a separate group. Survival analyses were then performed using Cox proportional hazard survival analysis. Women in all age groups had a lower risk of breast cancer specific death as compared to the reference group?=?20, however non-significantly. Nulliparous women had a higher risk of breast cancer specific death as compared to the same reference group, however these results were not statistically significant. We could not see any negative effect of late first childbirth on breast cancer specific survival.
PubMed ID
31907014 View in PubMed
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[Age-specific incidence of lung cancer in Sweden. Trends during the period 1959-1966]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28377
Source
Lakartidningen. 1971 Sep 15;68(38):4229-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1971

Aging population means more cancer cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197733
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Jul 11;163(1):77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-11-2000

Alcohol abstainers: a low-risk group for cancer--a cohort study of Norwegian teetotalers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11755
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1993 Mar-Apr;2(2):93-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Kjaerheim
A. Andersen
A. Helseth
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1993 Mar-Apr;2(2):93-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Temperance
Abstract
Groups with assumed health-protective life-styles have been studied for several decades, in search of causes for cancer. We have analyzed cancer incidence, total mortality, and cause-specific mortality in Norwegian teetotalers to assess the possible health gains from an alcohol-abstaining life-style. A cohort of 5332 members of the International Organization of Good Templars was followed for 10 years from 1980. The cancer incidence and the cause-specific mortality of the cohort has been compared to that of the total Norwegian population. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for all cancer sites was 74 [95% confidence interval (CI), 64-80] for men and 72 (95% CI, 61-84) for women. For possible alcohol-associated cancers, such as cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, liver, and larynx, the SIR was 43 (95% CI, 17-88) for both sexes combined. For lung cancer the SIR was 57 (95% CI, 37-90) for men and 10 (95% CI, 0-57) for women. When all alcohol- and tobacco-associated cancers were excluded, the SIR for both sexes combined was 79 (95% CI, 69-87). The standardized mortality ratio for total mortality was 81 (95% CI, 65-74). This significant decrease in total mortality was caused by reduced risks for all major causes of death. The study indicates that members of the Norwegian chapter of the International Organization of Good Templars are a low-risk group not only regarding alcohol- and tobacco-associated cancers, but also regarding all other cancers.
PubMed ID
8467252 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2003 Nov-Dec;(6):12-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu E Razvodovskii
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2003 Nov-Dec;(6):12-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Trends observed in Belarus during 1970-1999 and related with mortality of different-type cancer, e.g. breast cancer in women, cancer of the mouth, pharynx, esophagus and stomach, were analyzed versus trends related with the per-capita consumption of various beverages by using the time-series analysis. The results reveal a positive and statistically significant effect of the per-capita vodka consumption on the cancer mortality rate. According to the analysis, a 1% increase in the per-capita vodka consumption entails a 0.58% growth in the breast cancer mortality rate and a 0.66% growth in the esophagus cancer mortality rate. The case study is another solid proof to the fact that a substantial share of breast cancers and of esophageal cancers are brought about by strong beverages.
PubMed ID
14708187 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake, drinking patterns, and prostate cancer risk and mortality: a 30-year prospective cohort study of Finnish twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283880
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2016 Sep;27(9):1049-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
BA Dickerman
SC Markt
M. Koskenvuo
E. Pukkala
LA Mucci
J. Kaprio
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2016 Sep;27(9):1049-58
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Prospective Studies
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Risk
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Alcohol intake may be associated with cancer risk, but epidemiologic evidence for prostate cancer is inconsistent. We aimed to prospectively investigate the association between midlife alcohol intake and drinking patterns with future prostate cancer risk and mortality in a population-based cohort of Finnish twins.
Data were drawn from the Older Finnish Twin Cohort and included 11,372 twins followed from 1981 to 2012. Alcohol consumption was assessed by questionnaires administered at two time points over follow-up. Over the study period, 601 incident cases of prostate cancer and 110 deaths from prostate cancer occurred. Cox regression was used to evaluate associations between weekly alcohol intake and binge drinking patterns with prostate cancer risk and prostate cancer-specific mortality. Within-pair co-twin analyses were performed to control for potential confounding by shared genetic and early environmental factors.
Compared to light drinkers (=3 drinks/week; non-abstainers), heavy drinkers (>14 drinks/week) were at a 1.46-fold higher risk (HR 1.46; 95 % CI 1.12, 1.91) of prostate cancer, adjusting for important confounders. Among current drinkers, binge drinkers were at a significantly increased risk of prostate cancer (HR 1.28; 95 % CI 1.06, 1.55) compared to non-binge drinkers. Abstainers were at a 1.90-fold higher risk (HR 1.90; 95 % CI 1.04, 3.47) of prostate cancer-specific mortality compared to light drinkers, but no other significant associations for mortality were found. Co-twin analyses suggested that alcohol consumption may be associated with prostate cancer risk independent of early environmental and genetic factors.
Heavy regular alcohol consumption and binge drinking patterns may be associated with increased prostate cancer risk, while abstinence may be associated with increased risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality compared to light alcohol consumption.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27351919 View in PubMed
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834 records – page 1 of 84.