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Adherence to guidelines for surveillance colonoscopy in patients with ulcerative colitis at a Canadian quaternary care hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148080
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2009 Sep;23(9):613-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Dan Kottachchi
Derek Yung
John K Marshall
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2009 Sep;23(9):613-7
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biopsy - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic - pathology
Colitis, Ulcerative - complications - diagnosis
Colon - pathology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Colonic Polyps - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Colonoscopy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastroenterology - standards
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intestinal Mucosa - pathology
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Precancerous Conditions - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) are at high risk of colonic dysplasia. Therefore, surveillance colonoscopy to detect early dysplasia has been endorsed by many professional organizations.
To determine whether gastroenterologists at Hamilton Health Sciences (Hamilton, Ontario) adhere to recommendations for UC surveillance issued by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology and to retrospectively assess the incidence and type of dysplasia found and the subsequent outcome of patients with dysplasia (ie, colorectal cancer [CRC], colectomy, dysplasia recurrence).
A retrospective chart review of all patients with UC undergoing colonoscopy screening at Hamilton Health Sciences from January 1980 to January 2005, was performed. Patients were classified by the extent of colonic disease: limited left-sided colitis (LSC), pancolitis and any disease extent with concurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis.
A total of 141 patients fulfilled eligibility criteria. They underwent 921 endoscopies, including 453 for surveillance, which were performed by 20 endoscopists. Overall, screening was performed on 90% of patients, and surveillance at the appropriate time in 74%. There was a statistically significant increase in the mean number of biopsies per colonoscopy after the guidelines were published (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
19816624 View in PubMed
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[Alarming increase of esophageal cancer. Is antireflux surgery an efficient prevention?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20012
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Dec 20;97(51-52):6016-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-2000

Alcohol intake and breast cancer risk: effect of exposure from 15 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11320
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1995 Dec;4(8):843-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
L. Holmberg
J A Baron
T. Byers
A. Wolk
E M Ohlander
M. Zack
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Uppsala University, University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1995 Dec;4(8):843-7
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Research regarding the relationship between alcohol intake and breast cancer risk has suggested an association between the two, although the data are inconsistent regarding dose effects and susceptible populations. To clarify these issues, we investigated the association of breast cancer risk with alcohol intake at various ages in a population-based case-control study nested within a screening cohort in Sweden. Subjects were women 40-75 years old who participated in a screening program in central Sweden. Information about personal characteristics, diet, and alcohol intake was obtained by a questionnaire sent out at the invitation to the screening interview and at a supplementary interview conducted among a sample of women who did and did not develop breast cancer. Alcohol intake did not affect breast cancer risk among women under 50 years old. However, among those over 50 years of age, ever-drinking conferred a relative risk of 1.8 (95% confidence interval = 1.2-2.6). Current and former drinkers had similar increases in risk. No particular latent period of alcohol effect was identified, but drinking later in life to have a bigger effect than did drinking earlier in life.
PubMed ID
8634655 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake and the risk of lung cancer: influence of type of alcoholic beverage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10727
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Mar 1;149(5):463-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1999
Author
E. Prescott
M. Grønbaek
U. Becker
T I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Institute of Preventive Medicine, H:S Kommunehospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Mar 1;149(5):463-70
Date
Mar-1-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Beer - adverse effects
Comparative Study
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Wine
Abstract
Alcohol consumption has been associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, but the antioxidants in wine may, in theory, provide protection. This association was studied in 28,160 men and women subjects from three prospective studies conducted in 1964-1992 in Copenhagen, Denmark. After adjustment for age, smoking, and education, a low to moderate alcohol intake (1-20 drinks per week) was not associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Men who consumed 21-41 and more than 41 drinks per week had relative risks of 1.23 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.88-1.74) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.06-2.33), respectively. The risk of lung cancer differed according to the type of alcohol consumed: After abstainers were excluded, drinkers of 1-13 and more than 13 glasses of wine per week had relative risks of 0.78 (95% CI 0.63-0.97) and 0.44 (95% CI 0.22-0.86), respectively, as compared with nondrinkers of wine (p for trend = 0.002). Corresponding relative risks for beer intake were 1.09 (95% CI 0.83-1.43) and 1.36 (95% CI 1.02-1.82), respectively (p for trend = 0.01); for spirits, they were 1.21 (95% CI 0.97-1.50) and 1.46 (95% CI 0.99-2.14), respectively (p for trend = 0.02). In women, the ability to detect associations with high alcohol intake and type of beverage was limited because of a limited range of alcohol intake. The authors concluded that in men, a high consumption of beer and spirits is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, whereas wine intake may protect against the development of lung cancer.
PubMed ID
10067906 View in PubMed
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The Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217767
Source
Nutr Rev. 1994 Jul;52(7):242-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
J. Blumberg
G. Block
Author Affiliation
USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA.
Source
Nutr Rev. 1994 Jul;52(7):242-5
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Carotenoids - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Double-Blind Method
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Smoking - adverse effects
Vitamin E - therapeutic use
beta Carotene
Abstract
The U.S. National Cancer Institute and the Finnish National Public Institute jointly sponsored a large double-blind, placebo-controlled primary-prevention trial to examine the effects of vitamin E and beta-carotene supplementation on reducing the incidence of lung cancers in male smokers, ages 50-69 years. Supplementation did not result in a significant reduction in lung cancer, and a higher incidence of lung cancer was observed in the group receiving beta-carotene. These results should be examined within the context of the population studied before they are cited as definitive.
PubMed ID
8090376 View in PubMed
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Antihypertensive drug use and the risk of prostate cancer (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179065
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2004 Aug;15(6):535-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Linda Perron
Isabelle Bairati
François Harel
François Meyer
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche en cancérologie de l'Université Laval, Canada.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2004 Aug;15(6):535-41
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Humans
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Abstract
To verify if exposure to antihypertensive drugs was associated to prostate cancer (PC) risk.
We conducted a matched case-control study using record linkage between two population-based databases. We defined exposure as a binary variable and in terms of timing and cumulative duration of use. We controlled for detection bias and Aspirin use.
Among the 2221 cases and 11,105 controls, use of any antihypertensive agent was associated with an adjusted relative risk of PC of 0.98 (CI, 0.88-1.08). Of the different classes of antihypertensives, only beta-blockers (BBs) were associated with a reduction in PC risk (OR = 0.86, CI = 0.77-0.96). In those who cumulated or = 4 years of BB use, the risk was 0.89 (0.75-1.05), 0.91 (0.75-1.09), and 0.82 (0.69-0.96), respectively. Also, subjects with > or = 4 years of alpha-blocker (ABs) use had a non-significant 25% reduction in PC risk.
Our results suggest that BBs and long-term use of ABs may prevent PC whereas calcium channel blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors do not influence PC risk.
PubMed ID
15280632 View in PubMed
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Are smoking-associated cancers prevented or postponed in women using hormone replacement therapy?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18213
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Sep;102(3):565-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
H. Olsson
A. Bladström
C. Ingvar
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. hakan.olsson@onk.lu.se
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Sep;102(3):565-70
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Female
Hormone Replacement Therapy - adverse effects - methods
Humans
Incidence
Menopause
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Probability
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Smoking - adverse effects
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between hormone replacement therapy (HRT), smoking, and cancer incidence. METHODS: Baseline interviews were conducted from 1990 to 1992 in a population-based cohort of 29,508 Swedish women aged 25-65 years with no history of cancer. Cancer incidence in the cohort was assessed through December 31, 1999, with the Swedish Cancer Registry, the Population Census Registry, and the Cause of Death Registry. RESULTS: When follow-up ended, the cohort included 226,611 person-years. A total of 1145 malignancies were diagnosed (observed), and 1166.6 were expected (standardized incidence ratio 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93, 1.04). Women who had experienced a natural menopause and had ever used HRT had no increased incidence of cancer overall (standardized incidence ratio 1.03; 95% CI 0.88, 1.19). Long-term HRT users who smoked had a decreased incidence of smoking-related cancers, such as the oral cavity, pharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, esophagus, lung, cervix, and bladder (standardized incidence ratio 0.24; 95% CI 0.08, 0.76). The effect was seen regardless of the type of HRT (progestin versus non-progestin-containing preparations) used and number of cigarettes smoked. The protective role of HRT for colon cancer was evident among both smokers and nonsmokers. An increased incidence of endometrial cancer was seen only for nonsmokers who used HRT. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that HRT use protects women against smoking-associated cancers. This effect occurs regardless of the type of HRT and the amount of smoking.
PubMed ID
12962944 View in PubMed
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Ashes to ashes: the significance of preventing lung cancer through primary prevention and health promotion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197004
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2000;10(2):69-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000

Association between alcohol and lung cancer in the alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene cancer prevention study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201116
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Jun;10(3):219-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
K. Woodson
D. Albanes
J A Tangrea
M. Rautalahti
J. Virtamo
P R Taylor
Author Affiliation
Cancer Prevention Studies Branch, Division of Clinical Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892-7058, USA.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Jun;10(3):219-26
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Smoking - adverse effects
Vitamin E - therapeutic use
beta Carotene - therapeutic use
Abstract
We evaluated the association between alcohol intake and lung cancer in a trial-based cohort in Finland, the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC Study).
During an average of 7.7 years of follow-up, 1059 lung cancer cases were diagnosed among the 27,111 male smokers with complete alcohol and dietary information. The relationship between alcohol and lung cancer was assessed in multivariate Cox regression models that adjusted for age, smoking, body mass index and intervention group.
Nondrinkers, 11% of the study population, were at increased lung cancer risk compared to drinkers (RR = 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0-1.4), possibly due to the inclusion of ex-drinkers who had stopped drinking for health reasons. Among drinkers only, we observed no association between lung cancer and total ethanol or specific beverage (beer, wine, spirits) intake. We found no significant effect modification by level of smoking, dietary micronutrients or trial intervention group; however, for men in the highest quartile of alcohol intake, we observed a slight increase in risk for lighter smokers (30 cigarettes/day).
We concluded that alcohol consumption was not a risk factor for lung cancer among male cigarette smokers, and its effect was not significantly modified by other factors, notably smoking history.
PubMed ID
10454067 View in PubMed
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Association between frequent use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171565
Source
BMC Cancer. 2005;5:159
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Elham Rahme
Joumana Ghosn
Kaberi Dasgupta
Raghu Rajan
Marie Hudson
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Centre Research Institute, Montreal, Canada. elham.rahme@mcgill.ca
Source
BMC Cancer. 2005;5:159
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Anticarcinogenic Agents - therapeutic use
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Cyclooxygenase 2 - biosynthesis
Databases, Factual
Female
Humans
Insurance, Health
Mammography
Models, Statistical
Odds Ratio
Postmenopause
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Eighty percent of all breast cancers and almost 90% of breast cancer deaths occur among post-menopausal women. We used a nested case control design to examine the association between nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and breast cancer occurrence among women over 65 years of age. The cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 enzyme is expressed more in breast cancers than in normal breast tissue. COX-2 inhibition may have a role in breast cancer prevention.
In the Canadian province of Quebec, physician services are covered through a governmental insurance plan. Medication costs are covered for those > or = 65 years of age and a publicly funded screening program for breast cancer targets all women 50 years of age or older. We obtained encrypted data from these insurance databases on all women > or = 65 years of age who filled a prescription for COX-2 inhibitors, non-selective NSAIDs (ns-NSAIDs), aspirin, or acetaminophen between January 1998 and December 2002. Cases were defined as those women who have undergone mammography between April 2001 and June 2002 and had a diagnosis of breast cancer within six months following mammography. Controls included those who have undergone mammography between April 2001 and June 2002 without a diagnosis of any cancer during the six months following mammography. The exposure of interest, frequent NSAID use, was defined as use of ns-NSAIDs and/or COX-2 inhibitors for > or = 90 days during the year prior to mammography. Frequent use served as a convenient proxy for long term chronic use.
We identified 1,090 cases and 44,990 controls. Cases were older and more likely to have breast cancer risk factors. Logistic regression models adjusting for potential confounders showed that frequent use of ns-NSAIDs and/or COX-2 inhibitors was associated with a lower risk of breast cancer (OR: 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.64-0.89). Results were similar for COX-2 inhibitors (0.81, 0.68-0.97) and ns-NSAIDs (0.65, 0.43-0.99), when assessed separately. Frequent use of aspirin at doses > 100 mg/day in the year prior to mammography was also associated with a lower risk of breast cancer (0.75, 0.64-0.89). However, use of aspirin at doses 100 mg frequently may have a lower risk of breast cancer.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16343343 View in PubMed
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119 records – page 1 of 12.