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1168 records – page 1 of 117.

A 30-year analysis of cardiac neoplasms at autopsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173953
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):675-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Jagdish Butany
Shaun W Leong
Khenan Carmichael
Masashi Komeda
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Toronto General Hospital/University Health Network, Ontario. jagdish.butany@uhn.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):675-80
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Autopsy
Female
Heart Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Cardiac neoplasms are rare and the vast majority are metastatic in origin. Symptoms of cardiac neoplasms (primary or metastatic) usually appear late in the course of the disease and are often ignored because of the more severe effects of the primary malignant disorder or its therapy. Consequently, cardiac neoplasms, especially metastatic ones, are often not discovered until autopsy.
To assess the incidence of cardiac neoplasms at autopsy and to determine the sites of origins of metastatic cardiac neoplasms.
The pathology records from consecutive autopsies performed at the University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, from January 1973 to May 2004 were reviewed. They showed 266 cases of neoplasms involving the heart among 11,432 consecutive autopsies. These cases were then categorized based on their system of origin and further subclassified into specific primary site categories. As well, the type of cardiac tissue affected was noted in 193 cases (72.6%).
The 266 autopsy cases involving cardiac neoplasms represented 2.33% of the total number of autopsies. Among the 266 cases, two neoplasms were primaries, while 264 were metastatic in origin. Metastatic cardiac neoplasms most frequently metastasized from the respiratory system, followed (in order of decreasing frequency) by the hematopoietic, gastrointestinal, breast and genitourinary systems. A minority of metastatic cardiac neoplasms were found to have spread from other systems. Cardiac neoplasms most frequently involved the pericardium, followed (in order of decreasing frequency) by the myocardium, epicardium and endocardium.
There were 132 times more metastatic cardiac neoplasms than primary cardiac neoplasms found in the present study. The most common sites of metastatic origin were the lungs, bone marrow (leukemia/multiple myeloma), breasts and lymph nodes (lymphoma). Leukemias were more prevalent in the present study than in previous studies. The pericardium was the tissue that was most frequently affected by metastatic cardiac neoplasms.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2006 Jan;22(1):8016511961
PubMed ID
16003450 View in PubMed
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A 40-year history of overweight children in Stockholm: life-time overweight, morbidity, and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23563
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
L. DiPietro
H O Mossberg
A J Stunkard
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - etiology
Digestive System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We describe the 40-year weight history and adult morbidity and mortality in a cohort of 504 overweight children, aged 2 months to 16 years, who were admitted for investigation of their overweight to four children's hospitals in Stockholm between 1921 and 1947. Follow-up information was gathered by questionnaire at 10-year intervals, most recently in 1980-1983 (n = 458), on weight history (based on the body mass index (BMI = kg/m2)), as well as prevalence of cardiovascular disease (n = 143), diabetes (n = 39), and cancer (all types (n = 20)), reported during the 40 years of follow-up, and mortality from all causes (n = 55), determined from death certificate. The sample of overweight children remained overweight as adults; after age 55 years, the BMI began to decline for both genders. Female subjects were heavier than their male counterparts from postpuberty onward. Subjects who died by the 40-year follow-up and those reporting cardiovascular disease were significantly (P
PubMed ID
7812410 View in PubMed
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ABO and Rh blood groups in relation to ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer risk among the population of South-East Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118032
Source
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2012;13(10):5091-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Arseniy E Yuzhalin
Anton G Kutikhin
Author Affiliation
Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases under Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Kemerovo, Russian Federation.
Source
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2012;13(10):5091-6
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - adverse effects
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Prognosis
Rh-Hr Blood-Group System - adverse effects
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
There is a large amount of evidence that the ABO blood group system may play a role in disease etiology. A relationship between ABO and Rhesus blood groups and cancer risk has been demonstrated in a number of studies. However, in relation to gynecological malignancies, these findings are inconsistent and contradictory.
To perform a case-control study for analysis of the distribution of ABO and Rh blood antigens among women from South-East Siberia who suffered from ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer, and to assess the potential role of these antigens in carcinogenesis.
A total of 1,163 cases with ovarian cancer (n=551), endometrial cancer (n=440) and cervical cancer (n=172) were involved in the study. The control group was formed from 22,581 female blood donors. Blood groups were determined through patients medical records and blood donor records. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The blood group O was defined as the referent group, as it has the greatest frequency in the populations of Southern Siberia. P values less than 0.05 were regarded as statistically significant.
We found that carriage of non-O blood types increased the risk of ovarian cancer by 40-60%, and the magnitude of this relationship was strongest in women with the AB (IV) blood group. Carriage of the A (II) blood group strongly correlated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer in premenopausal, but not in postmenopausal women. No statistically significant correlations were obtained for endometrial cancer and cervical cancer. Additionally, we did not observe a relationship between Rhesus factor and cancer risk.
We suggest that carriage of non-O blood groups may elevate risk of ovarian cancer and can play a role in its development.
PubMed ID
23244116 View in PubMed
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Acromegaly and cancer risk: a cohort study in Sweden and Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18975
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Jun;13(5):395-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
D. Baris
G. Gridley
E. Ron
E. Weiderpass
L. Mellemkjaer
A. Ekbom
J H Olsen
J A Baron
J F Fraumeni
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7240, USA. barisd@mail.nih.gov
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Jun;13(5):395-400
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acromegaly - complications
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Growth Substances - blood
Humans
Incidence
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Several studies have suggested that patients with acromegaly have an increased risk of benign and malignant neoplasms, especially of the colon. To further investigate this relationship we evaluated cancer risk in population-based cohorts of acromegaly patients in Sweden and Denmark. METHODS: Nationwide registry-based cohorts of patients hospitalized for acromegaly (Denmark 1977-1993; Sweden 1965-1993) were linked to tumor registry data for up to 15-28 years of follow-up, respectively. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to estimate cancer risk among 1634 patients with acromegaly. RESULTS: The patterns of cancer risk in Sweden and Denmark were similar. After excluding the first year of follow-up, 177 patients with acromegaly had a diagnosis of cancer compared with an expected number of 116.5 (SIR = 1.5. 95% CI = 1.3-1.8). Increased risks were found for digestive system cancers (SIR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.62.7), notably of the small intestine (SIR = 6.0, 95% CI = 1.2-17.4), colon (SIR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.6-3.8), and rectum (SIR = 2.5, 95% CI= 1.3-4.2). Risks were also elevated for cancers of the brain (SIR = 2.7, 95% CI= 1.2-5.0). thyroid (SIR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.8-10.9), kidney (SIR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.6-5.5), and bone (SIR= 13.8, 95% CI= 1.7-50.0). CONCLUSIONS: The increased risk for several cancer sites among acromegaly patients may be due to the elevated proliferative and anti-apoptotic activity associated with increased circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Pituitary irradiation given to some patients may have contributed to the excess risks of brain tumors and thyroid cancer. Our findings indicate the need for close medical surveillance of patients with acromegaly, and further studies of the IGF-I system in the etiology of various cancers.
PubMed ID
12146843 View in PubMed
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Active and passive smoking and risk of renal cell carcinoma in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175756
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2005 Mar;41(5):770-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Jinfu Hu
Anne-Marie Ugnat
Author Affiliation
Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, 120 Colonnade Road 6702A, AL: 6702A, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9. jinfu_hu@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2005 Mar;41(5):770-8
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study aimed to assess the role of active and passive smoking in the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Mailed questionnaires were completed by 1279 incident RCC cases and 5370 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in eight Canadian provinces. Data were collected on socio-economic status, smoking habits, diet and passive smoking status, as well as residential and occupational history. The study found an increased risk of RCC associated with active smoking. Elevated risk of RCC was also observed with passive smoking; compared with those never exposed to either passive or active smoking, men and women with 43 or more years of passive residential and/or occupational exposure had respective adjusted Odds Ratios (ORs) of 3.9 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.4-10.6) and 1.8 (95% CI 1.0-3.3) (P=0.001 and P=0.09, respectively). Both active and passive smoking might play a role in the aetiology of RCC.
PubMed ID
15763654 View in PubMed
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Adenocarcinoma of the Oesophagus and Oesophagogastric Junction: Analysis of Incidence and Risk Factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279760
Source
Anticancer Res. 2016 May;36(5):2323-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Tuomo Rantanen
Niku Oksala
Juhani Sand
Source
Anticancer Res. 2016 May;36(5):2323-9
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Barrett Esophagus - epidemiology
Cholecystectomy - statistics & numerical data
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Esophagogastric Junction - pathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Fundoplication - statistics & numerical data
Gastroesophageal Reflux - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Neoplasm Staging
Neoplasms, Second Primary - epidemiology
Precancerous Conditions - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Conflicting data exist on the changes in the incidence of oesophageal (EAC) and oesophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma (EGJAC). In addition, risk factors of the disease are only partly known. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of EAC and EGJAC in Finland as well as risk factors of these cancers.
The complete number of new EAC and EGJAC cases between January 1980 and December 2007 in Finland was provided by the Finnish Cancer Registry. All treated EAC and EGJAC patients in the Pirkanmaa Hospital District between January 1980 and December 2007 were included in the study.
The incidence of EAC increased significantly in Finland. Barrett's oesophagus (BE) was associated with the risk of EAC and cholecystectomy with the risk of EGJAC.
A significant increase in EAC was found in Finland over the course of nearly 30 years, indicating that the increase in EAC in Finland is existent in the long term. BE was associated with the risk of EAC and cholecystectomy with the risk of EGJAC.
PubMed ID
27127139 View in PubMed
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Adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix: the presence of human papillomavirus and the method of detection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18218
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Oct;82(10):960-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Sonia Andersson
Barbro Larson
Anders Hjerpe
Claes Silfverswärd
Jan Sällström
Erik Wilander
Eva Rylander
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Science, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. sonia.andersson@telia.com
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Oct;82(10):960-5
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Adult
Age Factors
Contraceptives, Oral
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Papillomavirus, Human - isolation & purification
Papovaviridae Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Tumor Virus Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Vaginal Smears - standards
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Effective screening programs have contributed to a decrease in the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinomas but have had a limited sensitivity in the detection of adenocarcinoma precursor lesions. The aim of our study was to analyze cervical adenocarcinoma in greater detail: symptoms preceding the detection, the method of detection and the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) with respect to age at diagnosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Clinical data were abstracted from the medical records of 82 women with pure invasive cervical adenocarcinomas. As diagnostic tools we used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and/or direct DNA sequencing for HPV detection. RESULTS: Age at diagnosis predicting factors were HPV status, positive lymph nodes, histology and stage. HPV-negativity, lymph node metastases, advanced stage and poor differentiation were all associated with a high diagnostic age. In the multivariate analysis only HPV status was shown to have an independent impact on age at diagnosis, while stage showed only borderline significance. Twenty-three percent of the cancers were detected by screening and the remaining were due to different symptoms. Among the women considered, 93% had a normal Papanicolaou (Pap) smear 3 years before diagnosis and 60% within 1 year. There was no significant correlation between smoking, oral contraceptives and HPV-positivity. CONCLUSIONS: The absence of HPV was significantly associated with a high age at diagnosis. Pap screening had a limited effect in detecting adenocarcinoma at an early stage.
PubMed ID
12956848 View in PubMed
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Adherence to guidelines for surveillance colonoscopy in patients with ulcerative colitis at a Canadian quaternary care hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148080
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2009 Sep;23(9):613-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Dan Kottachchi
Derek Yung
John K Marshall
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2009 Sep;23(9):613-7
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biopsy - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic - pathology
Colitis, Ulcerative - complications - diagnosis
Colon - pathology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Colonic Polyps - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Colonoscopy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastroenterology - standards
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intestinal Mucosa - pathology
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Precancerous Conditions - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) are at high risk of colonic dysplasia. Therefore, surveillance colonoscopy to detect early dysplasia has been endorsed by many professional organizations.
To determine whether gastroenterologists at Hamilton Health Sciences (Hamilton, Ontario) adhere to recommendations for UC surveillance issued by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology and to retrospectively assess the incidence and type of dysplasia found and the subsequent outcome of patients with dysplasia (ie, colorectal cancer [CRC], colectomy, dysplasia recurrence).
A retrospective chart review of all patients with UC undergoing colonoscopy screening at Hamilton Health Sciences from January 1980 to January 2005, was performed. Patients were classified by the extent of colonic disease: limited left-sided colitis (LSC), pancolitis and any disease extent with concurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis.
A total of 141 patients fulfilled eligibility criteria. They underwent 921 endoscopies, including 453 for surveillance, which were performed by 20 endoscopists. Overall, screening was performed on 90% of patients, and surveillance at the appropriate time in 74%. There was a statistically significant increase in the mean number of biopsies per colonoscopy after the guidelines were published (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
19816624 View in PubMed
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Adult height and risk of breast cancer: a possible effect of early nutrition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19525
Source
Br J Cancer. 2001 Sep 28;85(7):959-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-2001
Author
T I Nilsen
L J Vatten
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, University Medical Centre, N-7489 Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2001 Sep 28;85(7):959-61
Date
Sep-28-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body Height
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child Welfare
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
The relationship of breast cancer to early reproductive development and height suggests that fetal and childhood nutrition may be important in its aetiology. Caloric restriction sufficient to reduce adult height may reduce breast cancer risk. During World War II (WWII) there was a marked reduction in average caloric intake in Norway that resulted in greater nutritional diversity. We hypothesized that a positive association between height and risk of breast cancer would be stronger among women who were born during this period than among women born before or after the war. A total of 25 204 Norwegian women were followed up for approximately 11 years, and 215 incident cases of breast cancer were registered. We found the strongest positive association between height and breast cancer among women born during WWII: women in the tallest tertile (>167 cm) had a relative risk of 2.5 (95% confidence interval = 1.2-5.5) compared with the shortest (
PubMed ID
11592765 View in PubMed
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1168 records – page 1 of 117.