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1973 records – page 1 of 198.

15 years after Chernobyl: new evidence of thyroid cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19395
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-2001
Author
Y. Shibata
S. Yamashita
V B Masyakin
G D Panasyuk
S. Nagataki
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Date
Dec-8-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Population Surveillance
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident happened on April 26, 1986. We investigated the cause of the striking increase in frequency of thyroid cancer in children who lived within a 150 km radius of Chernobyl and who were born before and after the accident. No thyroid cancer was seen in 9472 children born in 1987-89, whereas one and 31 thyroid cancers were recorded in 2409 children born April 27, 1986, to Dec 31, 1986, and 9720 born Jan 1, 1983, to April 26, 1986, respectively. Short-lived radioactive fallout caused by the Chernobyl accident probably induced thyroid cancer in children living near Chernobyl.
PubMed ID
11747925 View in PubMed
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[15 years after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19138
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2002 Mar-Apr;42(2):228-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
L A Buldakov
A K Gus'kova
Author Affiliation
State Research Centre-Institute of Biophysics, Russian Ministry of Health, Moscow, 123182 Russia.
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2002 Mar-Apr;42(2):228-33
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
Health effects as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant occurred in 1986 are considered in the paper. Wrong prognosis of the health effects with respect to mortality and morbidity among the population exposed to low radiation doses is shown. Proven increase in thyroid cancer cases among people who were children aged from 0 to 18 at the time of the accident is shown. Linear relationship between thyroid cancer cases and dose to thyroid ranged from 0.2 to 4.0 Gy is considered. An additional absolute risk of thyroid cancer in children varies in the range 1.9-2.6 cases per 10(4) person-year Gy. During the fifteen years following the accident no cases of acute and chronic radiation sickness have been revealed because the population living in contaminated areas received low radiation doses. Also, exposures to low radiation doses did not result in excess of malignant tumors among population. In some cases the outcomes of acute radiation sickness were as follows: radiation damages to the skin, cancer cataracts, development of oncopathology.
PubMed ID
12004624 View in PubMed
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A 30-year analysis of cardiac neoplasms at autopsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173953
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):675-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Jagdish Butany
Shaun W Leong
Khenan Carmichael
Masashi Komeda
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Toronto General Hospital/University Health Network, Ontario. jagdish.butany@uhn.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):675-80
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Autopsy
Female
Heart Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Cardiac neoplasms are rare and the vast majority are metastatic in origin. Symptoms of cardiac neoplasms (primary or metastatic) usually appear late in the course of the disease and are often ignored because of the more severe effects of the primary malignant disorder or its therapy. Consequently, cardiac neoplasms, especially metastatic ones, are often not discovered until autopsy.
To assess the incidence of cardiac neoplasms at autopsy and to determine the sites of origins of metastatic cardiac neoplasms.
The pathology records from consecutive autopsies performed at the University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, from January 1973 to May 2004 were reviewed. They showed 266 cases of neoplasms involving the heart among 11,432 consecutive autopsies. These cases were then categorized based on their system of origin and further subclassified into specific primary site categories. As well, the type of cardiac tissue affected was noted in 193 cases (72.6%).
The 266 autopsy cases involving cardiac neoplasms represented 2.33% of the total number of autopsies. Among the 266 cases, two neoplasms were primaries, while 264 were metastatic in origin. Metastatic cardiac neoplasms most frequently metastasized from the respiratory system, followed (in order of decreasing frequency) by the hematopoietic, gastrointestinal, breast and genitourinary systems. A minority of metastatic cardiac neoplasms were found to have spread from other systems. Cardiac neoplasms most frequently involved the pericardium, followed (in order of decreasing frequency) by the myocardium, epicardium and endocardium.
There were 132 times more metastatic cardiac neoplasms than primary cardiac neoplasms found in the present study. The most common sites of metastatic origin were the lungs, bone marrow (leukemia/multiple myeloma), breasts and lymph nodes (lymphoma). Leukemias were more prevalent in the present study than in previous studies. The pericardium was the tissue that was most frequently affected by metastatic cardiac neoplasms.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2006 Jan;22(1):8016511961
PubMed ID
16003450 View in PubMed
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A 40-year history of overweight children in Stockholm: life-time overweight, morbidity, and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23563
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
L. DiPietro
H O Mossberg
A J Stunkard
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - etiology
Digestive System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We describe the 40-year weight history and adult morbidity and mortality in a cohort of 504 overweight children, aged 2 months to 16 years, who were admitted for investigation of their overweight to four children's hospitals in Stockholm between 1921 and 1947. Follow-up information was gathered by questionnaire at 10-year intervals, most recently in 1980-1983 (n = 458), on weight history (based on the body mass index (BMI = kg/m2)), as well as prevalence of cardiovascular disease (n = 143), diabetes (n = 39), and cancer (all types (n = 20)), reported during the 40 years of follow-up, and mortality from all causes (n = 55), determined from death certificate. The sample of overweight children remained overweight as adults; after age 55 years, the BMI began to decline for both genders. Female subjects were heavier than their male counterparts from postpuberty onward. Subjects who died by the 40-year follow-up and those reporting cardiovascular disease were significantly (P
PubMed ID
7812410 View in PubMed
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131I ablation treatment in young females after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80419
Source
J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1723-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Travis Curtis C
Stabin Michael G
Author Affiliation
Science Applications International Corporation, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Traviscc@icx.net
Source
J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1723-7
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Child
Female
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Thyroid Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Ukraine
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
The Chernobyl accident resulted in a number of cases of thyroid cancer in females under the age of 20 y. Many of these individuals were treated with surgical removal of the thyroid gland followed by 131I ablation of residual thyroid tissue. Epidemiologic evidence demonstrates that 131I treatment for thyroid cancer or hyperthyroidism in adult women confers negligible risk of breast cancer. However, comparable data for younger women do not exist. Studies of external radiation exposure indicate that, for radiation exposures of as low as 0.2-0.7 Gy, the risk of breast cancer is greater for infant and adolescent female breast tissues than for adult female breast tissues. METHODS: The effective half-time of 131I measured in athyrotic patients was used together with the OLINDA/EXM computer code to estimate doses to breast tissue in 10-y-old, 15-y-old, and young adult females from ablation treatment. RESULTS: The dose to pediatric and young adult female breast tissue associated with a 5.6-GBq (150 mCi) ablation treatment may range from 0.35 to 0.55 Gy, resulting in a lifetime risk of breast cancer ranging from 2-4 cases per 100 such individuals exposed and a lifetime risk of solid tumors ranging from 8 to 17 solid tumors per 100 such individuals exposed. Administration of multiple ablation treatments, as often occurs with metastases, could result in doses ranging from 0.7 to 1 Gy, with corresponding increases in the lifetime cancer risk. CONCLUSION: These estimates suggest the need for additional research and a possible need for surveillance of young Chernobyl thyroid cancer patients who received 131I ablation treatment.
Notes
Comment In: J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1563-417015887
Erratum In: J Nucl Med. 2007 Jan;48(1):7
PubMed ID
17015910 View in PubMed
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ABO and Rh blood groups in relation to ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer risk among the population of South-East Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118032
Source
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2012;13(10):5091-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Arseniy E Yuzhalin
Anton G Kutikhin
Author Affiliation
Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases under Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Kemerovo, Russian Federation.
Source
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2012;13(10):5091-6
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - adverse effects
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Prognosis
Rh-Hr Blood-Group System - adverse effects
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
There is a large amount of evidence that the ABO blood group system may play a role in disease etiology. A relationship between ABO and Rhesus blood groups and cancer risk has been demonstrated in a number of studies. However, in relation to gynecological malignancies, these findings are inconsistent and contradictory.
To perform a case-control study for analysis of the distribution of ABO and Rh blood antigens among women from South-East Siberia who suffered from ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer, and to assess the potential role of these antigens in carcinogenesis.
A total of 1,163 cases with ovarian cancer (n=551), endometrial cancer (n=440) and cervical cancer (n=172) were involved in the study. The control group was formed from 22,581 female blood donors. Blood groups were determined through patients medical records and blood donor records. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The blood group O was defined as the referent group, as it has the greatest frequency in the populations of Southern Siberia. P values less than 0.05 were regarded as statistically significant.
We found that carriage of non-O blood types increased the risk of ovarian cancer by 40-60%, and the magnitude of this relationship was strongest in women with the AB (IV) blood group. Carriage of the A (II) blood group strongly correlated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer in premenopausal, but not in postmenopausal women. No statistically significant correlations were obtained for endometrial cancer and cervical cancer. Additionally, we did not observe a relationship between Rhesus factor and cancer risk.
We suggest that carriage of non-O blood groups may elevate risk of ovarian cancer and can play a role in its development.
PubMed ID
23244116 View in PubMed
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Abortion, breast cancer, and epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22237
Source
N Engl J Med. 1997 Jan 9;336(2):127-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-1997

Abortions and breast cancer: record-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18717
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Feb 20;103(5):676-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-2003
Author
Gunnar Erlandsson
Scott M Montgomery
Sven Cnattingius
Anders Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Gunnar.Erlandsson@mep.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Feb 20;103(5):676-9
Date
Feb-20-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - adverse effects
Abortion, Spontaneous
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Medical Records
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
It has been suggested that abortions leave the breast epithelium in a proliferative state with an increased susceptibility to carcinogenesis. Results from previous studies of induced or spontaneous abortions and risk of subsequent breast cancer are contradictory, probably due to methodological considerations. We investigated the relationship between abortions and subsequent breast cancer risk in a case-control study using prospectively recorded exposure information. The study population comprised women recorded in the population-based Swedish Medical Birth Register between 1973-91. Cases were defined by linkage of the birth register to the Swedish Cancer Register and controls were randomly selected from the birth register. From the subjects' antenatal care records we abstracted prospectively collected information on induced and spontaneous abortions, as well as a number of potential confounding factors. Relative risk of breast cancer was estimated by odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). A reduced risk of breast cancer was observed for women with a history of at least 1 compared to no abortions (adjusted OR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.72-0.99). The adjusted OR decreases step-wise with number of abortions to 0.59 (95% CI = 0.34-1.03) for 3 or more compared to no abortions. The patterns are similar for induced and spontaneous abortions. In conclusion, neither a history of induced nor spontaneous abortions is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Our data suggest a protective effect of pregnancies regardless of outcome.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2004 May 10;109(6):945-6; author reply 947-815027130
PubMed ID
12494478 View in PubMed
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[A certain increase of skin cancer among pilots].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184428
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2003
Author
Niklas Hammar
Harald Eliasch
Anette Linnersjö
Bo-Göran Dammström
Maritha Johansson
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Enheten för epidemiologi, Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. niklas.hammar@imm.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Date
Jun-26-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - manpower
Aircraft
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2278-912872371
PubMed ID
12872376 View in PubMed
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1973 records – page 1 of 198.