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The aetiology of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3952
Source
Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci. 2001 Apr;26(2):82-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
A L McDermott
S N Dutt
J C Watkinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham University, Birmingham, UK.
Source
Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci. 2001 Apr;26(2):82-92
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Africa - epidemiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asia - epidemiology
Carcinoma - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a disease with a remarkable racial and geographical distribution. In most parts of the world it is a rare condition and in only a handful of places does this low risk profile alter. These include the Southern Chinese, Eskimos and other Arctic natives, inhabitants of South-East Asia and also the populations of North Africa and Kuwait.
PubMed ID
11309046 View in PubMed
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Aetiology of thyroid cancer: an epidemiological overview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23695
Source
Thyroidology. 1994 Apr;6(1):11-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
G B Salabè
Author Affiliation
Istituto di Medicina Sperimentale del CNR, Roma, Italy.
Source
Thyroidology. 1994 Apr;6(1):11-9
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Carcinogens
Demography
Diet - adverse effects
Ethnic Groups
Goiter - complications
Hormones - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Radiation Injuries
Sex Factors
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Abstract
Thyroid cancer is a relatively rare cancer (5 new cases/y/10(5) inhabitants). An excess of thyroid carcinoma has been found in some but not in all goiter endemic areas. Follicular and anaplastic carcinomas have been found particularly frequent in regions of goitre endemia. A significant increase of thyroid carcinoma has also been found in iodine sufficient areas (Norway, Iceland, Hawaii). In several surveys a positive correlation has been found between parity and incidence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Natural goitrogens and chemotherapeutic agents have been proved to induce hyperplasia but their role in carcinogenesis of exposed populations is not yet definitely ascertained. Exposure to external radiation is carcinogenic for the thyroid both in human and in experimental animals. Patients treated for hyperthyroidism or thyroid cancer or given diagnostic doses of 131-I (0.5 Gy/test) indicate that under these conditions 131-I is not carcinogenic. Findings on population exposed to radioactive fallout showed an increased incidence of thyroid carcinomas compared to unexposed populations. After the Chernobyl accident (1986) particular attention was given to calculate the risk of thyroid cancer caused by the fallout of 131-I. Up to now a considerable increase of thyroid carcinoma has been reported in children of a region near Chernobyl (Belarus).
PubMed ID
7536443 View in PubMed
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Age at immigration and duration of stay in relation to risk for testicular cancer among Finnish immigrants in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18240
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2003 Aug 20;95(16):1238-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-2003
Author
Anders Ekbom
Lorenzo Richiardi
Olof Akre
Scott M Montgomery
Pär Sparén
Author Affiliation
Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Anders.Ekbom@medks.ki.se
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2003 Aug 20;95(16):1238-40
Date
Aug-20-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Dysgerminoma - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
Finland - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Seminoma - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Although the incidence of testicular cancer is increasing, substantial differences in incidence between countries and populations exist. These differences cannot be explained solely by genetic differences, but environmental exposures, particularly early exposures, have been implicated in the etiology of testicular cancer. To assess whether early exposures contribute to the incidence of testicular cancer, we identified 93 172 Finnish men who immigrated to Sweden between 1969 and 1996 and followed them for the occurrence of testicular cancer. The risk of testicular cancer was lower for Finnish immigrants to Sweden than for the Swedish general population (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 0.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.21 to 0.53). The reduced risk was associated with both seminomas and non-seminomas. Neither age at immigration nor duration of stay in Sweden had any impact on the reduced risk. Although the type of environmental exposures remains unknown, the results strongly indicate that early exposures are major determinants for testicular cancer.
PubMed ID
12928349 View in PubMed
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Agreement between birthplace and self-reported ethnicity in a population-based mammography service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154371
Source
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2008 Jul-Sep;9(3):511-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Chris D Bajdik
M C Barroetavena
S R Saroa
T Gregory Hislop
Author Affiliation
BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver BC, Canada. cbajdik@bccrc.ca
Source
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2008 Jul-Sep;9(3):511-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Early Detection of Cancer
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Mammography
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Self Disclosure
Abstract
Ethnicity is associated with genetic, environmental, lifestyle and social constructs. Difficult to define using a single variable, but strongly predictive of health outcomes and useful for planning healthcare services, it is often lacking in administrative databases, necessitating the use of a surrogate measure. A potential surrogate for ethnicity is birthplace. Our aim was to measure the agreement between birthplace and ethnicity among six major ethic groups as recorded at the population-based mammography service for British Columbia, Canada (BC).
We used records from the most-recent visits of women attending the Screening Mammography Program of British Columbia to cross-tabulate women's birthplaces and self-reported ethnicities, and separately considered results for the time periods 1990-1999 and 2000-2006. In general, we combined countries according to the system adopted by the United Nations, and defined ethnic groups that correspond to the nation groups. The analysis considered birthplaces and corresponding ethnicities for South Asia, East/Southeast Asia, North Europe, South Europe, East Europe, West Europe and all other nations combined. We used the kappa statistic to measure the concordance between self-reported ethnicity and birthplace.
Except for the 'Other' category, the most-common birthplace was East/Southeast Asia and the most-common ethnicity was East/Southeast Asian. The agreement between birthplace and self-reported ethnicity was poor overall, as evidenced by kappa scores of 0.22 in both 1990-1999 and 2000-2006. There was substantial agreement between ethnicity and birthplace for South Asians, excellent agreement for East/Southeast Asians, but poor agreement for Europeans.
Birthplace can be used as a surrogate for ethnicity amongst people with South Asian and East/Southeast Asian ethnicity in BC.
PubMed ID
18990030 View in PubMed
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American Indian/Alaska Native cancer policy: systemic approaches to reducing cancer disparities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127262
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2012 Apr;27 Suppl 1:S18-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Donald Warne
Judith Kaur
David Perdue
Author Affiliation
North Dakota State University, NDSU Dept 2660, PO Box 6050, Fargo, ND 58108-6050, USA. donald.warne@ndsu.edu
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2012 Apr;27 Suppl 1:S18-23
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Promotion - methods
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Politics
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
Members of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribes have a unique political status in the United States in terms of citizenship, and that political status determines eligibility for certain unique healthcare services. The AI/AN population has a legal right to healthcare services based on treaties, court decisions, acts of Congress, Executive Orders, and other legal bases. Although the AI/AN population has a right to healthcare services, the Indian Health Service (the federal agency responsible for providing healthcare to AI/ANs) is severely underfunded, limiting access to services (including cancer care). In order to overcome distinct cancer health disparities, policy changes will be needed. This paper reviews the historical pattern of AI/AN healthcare and the challenges of the complex care needed from prevention through end-of-life care for cancer.
PubMed ID
22311689 View in PubMed
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The APC gene I1307K variant is rare in Norwegian patients with familial and sporadic colorectal or breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21545
Source
Cancer Res. 1998 Jul 15;58(14):2923-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1998
Author
R A Lothe
M. Hektoen
H. Johnsen
G I Meling
T I Andersen
T O Rognum
A. Lindblom
A L Børresen-Dale
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo. rlothe@radium.uio.no
Source
Cancer Res. 1998 Jul 15;58(14):2923-4
Date
Jul-15-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Female
Genes, APC - genetics
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Recently, a T-to-A transversion creating an 8-base mononucleotide tract in the APC gene, resulting in substitution of lysine for isoleucine at codon 1307 (I1307K), was found in a subset of Ashkenazi Jews. This sequence variant was most frequent in colorectal cancer patients with a positive family history of colorectal cancer. To determine whether the I1307K variant plays a role in colorectal or breast cancer predisposition in the Norwegian population, we have analyzed blood samples from 210 colorectal cancer patients and 183 breast cancer patients by PCR and direct sequencing. Thirty-seven of the colorectal cancer patients had a positive family history of cancer. Among the breast cancer patients, 24 had a family history of colorectal cancer and 75 a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Only one colorectal cancer patient who belonged to a Jewish family was found to carry the A variant. Our data show that the I1307K variant is rare in the Norwegian population and should not be viewed as a candidate for susceptibility testing for colorectal cancer.
PubMed ID
9679946 View in PubMed
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Associations between community income and cancer incidence in Canada and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197496
Source
Cancer. 2000 Aug 15;89(4):901-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2000
Author
W J Mackillop
J. Zhang-Salomons
C J Boyd
P A Groome
Author Affiliation
Radiation Oncology Research Unit, Kingston Regional Cancer Centre, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Cancer. 2000 Aug 15;89(4):901-12
Date
Aug-15-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups
Female
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Income
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Reference Standards
Risk factors
Social Class
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and the incidence of cancer have been reported previously in the U.S. Canada has more comprehensive health care and social programs than the U.S. The purpose of this study was to compare the strength of associations between SES and cancer incidence in Canada and the U.S.
The regions studied were the Canadian province of Ontario and the areas of the U.S. covered by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. The populations at risk were defined using the 1991 Canadian Census and the 1990 U.S. Census. The populations of Ontario and of the SEER areas of the U.S. were each divided into deciles on the basis of median household income. Population-based cancer registries were used to identify incident cases. Age-standardized incidence rates for all major groups of malignant diseases were calculated for each SES decile in Ontario and in the U.S. Income-associated incidence gradients observed in Ontario and the U.S. were compared.
The incidence of most types of cancer was similar in Ontario and the U.S. In both countries, there were moderately strong, inverse associations between income level and the incidence of carcinomas of the cervix, the head and neck region, the lung, and the gastrointestinal tract. In both Ontario and the U.S., several of these diseases were twice as common in the bottom income decile than they were in the top decile. In contrast, carcinoma of the female breast and carcinoma of the prostate were more common among higher income communities in both countries, but the observed associations were weaker in Ontario.
Despite Canada's universal health insurance and more comprehensive social security system, the association between lower socioeconomic status and the incidence of many common cancers is just as strong in Ontario as it is in the U.S. The mechanisms responsible for these associations require further investigation.
PubMed ID
10951356 View in PubMed
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Associations between the MDM2 promoter P1 polymorphism del1518 (rs3730485) and incidence of cancer of the breast, lung, colon and prostate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287716
Source
Oncotarget. 2016 May 10;7(19):28637-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2016
Author
Liv B Gansmo
Lars Vatten
Pål Romundstad
Kristian Hveem
Bríd M Ryan
Curtis C Harris
Stian Knappskog
Per E Lønning
Source
Oncotarget. 2016 May 10;7(19):28637-46
Date
May-10-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - genetics
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
China - epidemiology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - ethnology - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Norway - epidemiology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions, Genetic - genetics
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2 - genetics
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The MDM2 promoter region contains several polymorphisms, some of which have been associated with MDM2 expression, cancer risk and age at cancer onset. del1518 (rs3730485) is an indel polymorphism residing in the MDM2 promoter P1 and is in almost complete linkage disequilibrium with the MDM2 promoter P2 polymorphism SNP309T>G (rs2279744). Cancer risk assessments of del1518 have previously been conducted in relatively small Chinese populations only. In this study we assessed the genotype distribution of del1518 among healthy Caucasians, African Americans and Chinese, and we estimated the Odds Ratios (OR) for incident cancer of the breast, colon, lung and prostate (n=7,081) as compared to controls (n=3,749) in a large Caucasian (Norwegian) cohort.We found the genotypes of the del1518 to vary significantly between healthy Caucasians, African-Americans and Chinese (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
27081698 View in PubMed
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A bibliometric analysis of cancer among American Indians & Alaska Natives, 1966-1993.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4085
Source
Alaska Med. 1995 Apr-Jun;37(2):59-62, 77
Publication Type
Article
Author
M C Mahoney
A M Michalek
Author Affiliation
Department of Educational Affairs, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 1995 Apr-Jun;37(2):59-62, 77
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Bibliometrics
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
MEDLINE
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
A bibliometric analysis was employed to objectively assess scientific studies published between 1966 and 1993 which have described cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Searches of the MEDLINE (1966-1993) and CANCERLIT data bases (1983-1994) were used to identify relevant publications. In addition to examining publication sources and quantitative temporal trends, further bibliometric analyses were completed by considering a subset of papers published between 1982 and 1992. A total of 128 studies of cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives were published between 1966 and 1993; 62 of these articles (48%) appeared between 1988 and 1993. Nine journals accounted for 53% of the total publications. The subset of 68 papers published between 1982 and 1992 were cited a total of 388 times in 136 different journals; the median number of citations was 2. Results demonstrate a limited number of published papers on cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives. It is hoped that this paper will increase the awareness of cancer as an important health problem among American Indian and Alaska Natives and thereby serve to stimulate additional cancer-related research activities involving these groups.
PubMed ID
7661328 View in PubMed
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BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Russian familial breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19347
Source
Hum Mutat. 2002 Feb;19(2):184
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Irina V Tereschenko
Victoria M Basham
Bruce A J Ponder
Paul D P Pharoah
Author Affiliation
Department of Prevention, Cancer Research Institute, Tomsk Scientific Centre, Tomsk, Russia. tivru@yahoo.com
Source
Hum Mutat. 2002 Feb;19(2):184
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Codon, Nonsense - genetics
DNA Mutational Analysis
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Founder Effect
Frameshift Mutation - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genes, BRCA1
Genes, BRCA2
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Heteroduplex Analysis
Humans
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
We have screened index cases from 25 Russian breast/ovarian cancer families for germ-line mutations in all coding exons of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, using multiplex heteroduplex analysis. In addition we tested 22 patients with breast cancer diagnosed before age 40 without family history and 6 patients with bilateral breast cancer. The frequency of families with germline mutations in BRCA was 16% (4/25). One BRCA1 mutation, 5382insC, was found in three families. The results of present study, and those of a separate study of 19 breast-ovarian cancer families, suggest that BRCA1 5382insC is a founder mutation in the Russian population. Three BRCA2 mutations were found in patients with breast cancer without family history: two in young patients and one in patients with bilateral breast cancer. Four novel BRCA2 mutations were identified: three frameshift (695insT, 1528del4, 9318del4) and one nonsense (S1099X).
PubMed ID
11793480 View in PubMed
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121 records – page 1 of 13.